Lisa Lynne ft. Aryeh Frankfurter – “Interlace IV”.

Hi people! 🙂

Some time ago, I’ve shared with you a piece from this duo called

“Interlace II”,

and I thought I’d share another of the Interlaces today, from the same album. I don’t know if it’s somehow imperative to listen to this whole album in the right order, since some tracks on it are numbered and whether it’s not intended to just listen to single pieces from it, I know that some albums work this way that listening one random piece or the album in a shuffle mode makes a lot less sense than when you listen to it the way it’s made to be listened to, but in this case I’ve both listened to the entire album in its order and all the pieces separately many times and I don’t see such a necessity, personally. So here’s “Interlace IV”, just because it was playing in my brain earlier today.

Bendith – “Dan Glo” (Locked).

Hey guys! 🙂

For today, I chose a beautiful song, another one from the self-titled album by Bendith – the Welsh folk music project which is a collaboration between the band Plu (Gwilym Bowen Rhys and his two older sisters – Elan and Marged) – and Carwyn Ellis from the indie pop band Colorama. In this particular piece, we can hear Carwyn and Marged’s vocals.

I like the slightly dark feel of this song. I love reading reviews of albums that I particularly love – and this one definitely belongs in this category – to see how my reception of them is similar/different to the reviewer’s and perhaps sometimes gain some more insight along the way. And I remember reading in one review, I believe it was written by Helen Gregory from Folk Radio UK but I’m not perfectly sure, that this piece feels very cinematic. I think this is the absolutely perfect word to describe it!

Maire Brennan – “Nuair a Bhí Óg” (When We Were Young).

Hey guys! 🙂

After some Enya’s music, time for a song from her older sister – Maire, or Moya, who is most known for being a vocalist and harpist with Clannad but is also a solo artist which you may know already from my blog where I’ve shared some of her music before. – Here is the translation of this song:

 

We ran up in respect of the mountains

I have lost many days

Leaping over water stones

Playing with us outdoors |

Thinking of Tír na nÓg ‘s stories

When we were young

The sun shining through the tops of the trees

When we were young

Listening to the radio with fresh music | When we were young

the wind blowing through my family ‘s place

When we were young

Below stay a white beach in Summer

We laughed with fun and games

Fishing with a rod we did

Dance and music at the end of the day

Enya – “Sumiregusa” (Wild Violet).

Hi people! 🙂

Because I’ve been listening to Enya a lot again (typically Enya time for me is around winter, when I feel like listening to more of her music) I feel like sharing a lot of her music with you and today is yet another song from her.

Enya is known for singing in many languages, not just her native Irish Gaelic and English, and Loxian created by Roma Ryan. The song I want to share with you is in Japanese. According to Roma Ryan, it was inspired by hokku by the Japanese poet Basho, who in turn was inspired by a wild violet. This song was used by Panasonic in Japan for advertising Vera Television.

I had a time as a teen when this song was my go-to piece of music whenever I felt overwhelmed, especially in a sensory way, and I still find it helpful.

What I think is very funny about this song is that there’s no mention of violet, at least in the English translation of it. Instead, we have a wild iris. I don’t know if this is a translation issue, or maybe they’re both the same in Japanese, or something else like that. The line which is supposed to mean “A wild iris” is “Ayameghusa” in Japanese, so maybe it’s a completely different thing… It’s quite confusing, at least if you don’t know Japanese. But it’s weird how the whole thing is about a wild violet, which is even credited as the initial source of inspiration for Basho, yet there’s apparently no mention of it in the actual song. 😀

 

The poignancy of things

A purple flower

The blossoms of spring

And the light snow of winter

How they fall

The beauty of nature

A green leaf and

Autumn colors

The voice of the wind

The song of birds

A sad sea

A joyful sea

Mountains

Pebbles

A wild iris

Declan Galbraith – “Danny Boy”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I’d like to share with you a piece from another of my faza people – Declan Galbraith, these days also known as Child of Mind. – This song, however, was sung by him long before the Child of Mind project, as it’s from his very first, self-titled album from 2002, which he recorded at the age of 10. Some songs on it are original material, but mostly they’re covers of either pop classics or, as in this case, quite well-known Celtic folk songs. Declan definitely has a special relationship with Celtic music, even if it’s less apparent in his later music. This is because he is of both Irish and Scottish descent, and his grandfather – affectionately called Poppy Ben by Declan – with whom he had a very close relationship because he was looked after by his grandparents a lot as a child; played several instruments in a Celtic music bands, and would often take Declan along on rehearsals and concerts.

“Danny Boy” was written at the beginning of 20th century by an English lawyer and lyricist, Frederic Weatherly. He was introduced to the song “Londonderry Air” by his sister, and set this new song of his to its melody. It is not known how exactly this song should be interpreted and what the author had in mind writing it, but what comes to mind for many people is that it’s from the perspective of a parent, whose son is leaving home for war or an uprising, which makes sense to me.

Enya – “I Could Never Say Goodbye”.

Hi guys! 🙂

Yes, another Enya’s song, and another about goodbyes! I couldn’t possibly say which one I like more. This one, as it’s easy to figure out, is about loss of a loved one. According to what Enya has said about this song it’s mostly about a loss due to death. I think she captured the essence of what it feels like very well in this song.

Enya – “Someone Said Goodbye”.

Hi guys! 🙂

Today I’m sharing with you another Enya song, this time from her album Amarantine. According to her lyricist – Roma Ryan – this song is about that moment of the day, at the end of it, when we start to reflect on our lives and all the saddest times come up in our memory, bringing sad feelings. This is an awful feeling, but I think this is the best song to listen to when it happens to make you realise more clearly that everyone goes through things like this, in some way, and you’re not alone.

Bendith – “Bendith” (Blessing).

Hey guys! 🙂

The piece I have for you today comes from the musical project called Bendith, from their album called Bendith, and the piece is called Bendith as well. Bendith have featured on my blog a few times earlier, because one of my faza people – Gwilym Bowen Rhys – took part in it. It is a collaboration between members of the band Plu (Gwilym and his two sisters) and Carwyn Ellis – leader of Colorama, an indie pop Welsh band. – Plu and Colorama sound very different from each other, but the four are all a very versatile bunch and, judging from the album, must have gotten along very well musically. The idea came from Carwyn Ellis, with whom the music of Plu resonated very strongly so he reached out to them asking if they’d like to do something together. And that’s how Bendith was born, it sounds a lot like Plu, yet different. I like how it’s both so contemporary yet also rootsy, filled with nostalgia and childhood memories. “Bendith” is the closing track from this album.

 

Below is a link to Songwhip, where you can (hopefully) find this piece on your favourite streaming service. There is a link to YouTube as well but it’s not properly tagged or something, and it links to a different song.

Bendith – “Bendith”.

Órla Fallon – “Nead na lachan” (The Duck’s Nest) & Éilís Kennedy – “Nead na lachan”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I have one song, but in two versions for you. Sometimes it’s just impossible to decide for only one, and why limit oneself so much when they’re both great. I came across both Órla Fallon’s and

Éilís Kennedy’s music quite early on during my Celtic music exploration journey, and so I’ve been familiar with this song for years. In fact, I now consider it a bit strange but, for some time, years ago, it almost felt like I had a slight faza on

Éilís Kennedy. She does have LOADS of great songs, and fulfills many criteria that my faza people should meet at least theoretically, but it’s weird, as talented as she is, I don’t really know what exactly pulled me so much specifically into her music. I do like it a lot still but now I wouldn’t say that it resonates with me in such a special way as it is with my major faza subjects.

This song of hers was one of my most favourites because I considered it quite funny back then. So did Sofi, especially the chorus. And it actually is a children’s song. I have really nice memories with it as well.

I heard Órla’s version a lot later on, but because her version is great too, as is she as a singer in general, and because she’s more recognisable among the Celtic music fans because of having been a member of the Irish all-female group Celtic Woman, I thought it would be good to include her version here as well. And also Órla is a harpist, and harpists are always welcome in this series on my blog.:D

As for

Éilís, she comes from county Dingle and, aside from being a solo singer and clarinettist, she also used to collaborate a lot with Pauline Scanlon, as part of a band called Lumiere.

Here’s the translation of the lyrics:

 

The duck’s nest in the moat

The duck’s nest in the moat

The duck’s nest in the moat

And I will send you out on the bay

I’ll get you a curragh and crew

I’ll get you a curragh and crew

I’ll get you a curragh and crew

And I’ll send you out on the bay

I will buy you a rod and line

I will buy you a rod and line

I will buy you a rod and line

And I will send you out on the bay

Órla Fallon:

Éilís Kennedy:

Lisa Lynne ft. Aryeh Frankfurter – “Eliz Iza”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Another harp (& nyckelharpa) piece for you today. I know that this is originally a song, with Breton lyrics, and it’s traditional, that it’s otherwise known as Ti Eliz Iza, and I know that ti means house in Breton, so I’d think it’s about the house of someone named Eliz Iza, but I’m not 100% sure that Eliz Iza is actually someone’s name here, it just sounds like it could be. I don’t know Breton so I can’t deciffer the lyrics, and the only translation I’ve found sounds a bit nonsensical. But it’s an instrumental here anyway, so we don’t need to think about the lyrics, I’ve never heard them sung anyway. I just like the melody of this piece, it’s beautiful.

Llio Rhydderch – “Edward’s Grip”.

For today, I chose to share with you another piece from this amazing harpist. This is also one of the first pieces from her that I’ve ever heard. It comes from her collaborative album with Tomos Williams (on trumpet) and Mark O’Connor (on drums), but this particular tune is just a solo harp one and it’s definitely my favourite from this album and one from my most favourite pieces of music from Llio overall.

Song of the day (21st April ) – Gwenan Gibbard – “Traeth Lafan/Adlais Nia/Pen Rhaw” (Lavan Sounds/Nia’s Echo/Spade’s Head”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today, I’m sharing with you a few pieces in one track from Gwenan Gibbard. As far as I know, the first two are her own compositions, and the third one is traditional for sure. The first one, like many tunes by Gwenan Gibbard, is inspired by nature in north Wales. This one is dedicated to Traeth Lafan, or Lavan Sands in English, which is an intertidal sandbank in Gwynedd.

Catrin Finch – “Aurora”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Today I’m sharing with you a very beautiful piece from Welsh harpist Catrin Finch, whose music I’ve already shared with you a few times before, also some in collaboration with Senegalese kora player Seckou Keita. I’m sharing this particular piece with you because that’s what I woke up to today, and it was such a great feeling to listen to it somewhere between the real world and Dreamland.

Llio Rhydderch – “Titrwm Tatrwm” (Pitter Patter).

Hey guys! 🙂

Today, I’m sharing with you another piece by Llio Rhydderch. There’s a traditional song in Welsh by the same name about a boy who visits a girl he loves in the night and throws small stones at her window, hence the Pitter Patter title, but that one has a different melody, so I’m not sure if this one has anything to do with it, and I might share that one with you too at some point. In any case, I really like this piece, but then again, I like absolutely everything from Llio!

Clannad – “Vellum”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Recently I shared with you all a piece from Clannad’s debut album, and now I thought I would share a piece from their last album, which was released in 2013, after I believe a fifteen-year break since the release of Landmarks. I think comparing these two pieces and their style shows quite well how Clannad has evolved over all those years since its beginning.

Lynn Saoirse – “Isabella Burke/Planxty Burke”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Today I’m sharing with you two harp pieces performed by Irish harpist Lynn Saoirse, and composed by the famous 18th-century Irish Celtic harpist Turlough O’Carolan. I wrote about him before when sharing some piece composed by him. He was travelling a lot and staying in the houses of rich people, playing for them. At the end of his stay, he would typically present his hosts with a piece that he wrote especially for them, as a way of expressing his gratitude. And these pieces that he composed specifically for his patrons are called planxty, just like the second piece in this set. I don’t know who the Burkes were, or maybe it was just one person, in his life, nor who was Isabella Burke to whom the first piece is specifically dedicated, beyond quite an obvious fact that they must have been his patrons. I really like both these pieces and I can’t even decide which one is more beautiful.