Gwenan Gibbard – “Paid â Deud” (Don’t Say).

Hey guys! 🙂

Today I’m sharing with you a song from Welsh harpist and singer Gwenan Gibbard, already featured on this blog multiple times. I don’t really know much about this song, not eve whether it’s her original composition, or a traditional tune, or maybe someone else wrote and composed it in modern times, but I think it’s beautiful.

Morgan Elwy – “Bach o Hwne” (A Bit of That).

Hi hi hi people! 🙂

Today I have a song in Welsh for you, this year’s winner of Cân i Gymru (Song for Wales) which took place in early March. Since Cân i Gymru is very exciting, and also, as you may or may not recall, Morgan is the brother of Jacob Elwy, who’s one of my

faza peeps,

despite I wasn’t able to watch Cân i Gymru, I was following it at the time of it happening and keeping all my fingers, toes, and brain hemispheres crossed for him, ’cause I’m loyal to my faza peeps and that includes their families too. So he basically couldn’t have not won, physically impossible. But even putting this personal bias of mine aside as much as it’s possible, this tune was very much fit for winning. As I think I have written before, there’s not much reggae on the Welsh-language music scene, or at least I don’t know of many Welsh singers who have done it, only a few, but perhaps it’s just me being ignorant. So with this song and then later with his album he is filling what seems to me an important and quite a big gap in Welsh music, doing something maybe not entirely new (as it’s not like previously Welsh-language reggae was never a thing at all, there’s just not much of it) but still very fresh and exciting, and doing it well (as far as I can tell not being a huge reggae fanatic or anything) and it’s no wonder that people must have fallen in love with it. This song was also included on his album Teimlo’r Awen (Feeling the Muse) which was released in May.

Personally I don’t love this song, it doesn’t necessarily speak to me very strongly, but I still do like it and its very upbeat vibe which can instantly make you smile.

I definitely don’t understand the lyrics well enough to do a translation, or even tell you in detail of what it’s about, but from what I do gather, and from what I understood from Cân i Gymru’s website, this song is about the value of friends and having a lot of fun with them.

Rosey Cale – “Ceidwad” (Keeper).

Hey people! 🙂

For today, I chose a really nice song to share with you from a Welsh singer from Pembrokeshire called Rosey Cale. She is a strongly country-leaning artist, and as you might know country isn’t really my thing, also she mostly sings her music in English, but I really like this one Welsh song from her. It is also available in English and titled Keeper, but I personally prefer the Welsh one so that’s why I’m only sharing this one. I think it’s really cool and she has great vocals.

Song of the day (17th August) – Plu – “Geiriau Allweddol” (Keywords).

Hiya people! 🙂

I thought I’d share with you this very dynamic song from Plu. It comes from their self-titled debut album and it’s their original, with Elan’s and Marged’s lyrics, and Gwilym’s music.

Sian James – “Cysga Di Fy Mhlentyn Tlws” (Sleep My Pretty Child).

Hey people! 🙂

Since it’s already early evening here, I thought I’d share a lullaby with you, and I picked this beautiful Welsh one performed by Celtic harpist and singer Sian James, whose music I’ve already shared on my blog before. Here is the lyrics translation that I’ve found:

 

Sleep you now, my pretty child,

Sleep you now, my pretty child,

Sleep until the morning,

Sleep until the morning.

The door is closed, and safely locked,

Lullaby, my pretty child,

Sleep until the morning,

Sleep until the morning.

All the birds are sleeping too,

Lullaby, my little one,

Sleep until the morning,

Sleep until the morning.

The wooden horse is by your side,

Lullaby, oh darling mine,

Sleep until the morning,

Sleep until the morning.

Song of the day (27th July) – Y Trwbz – “Tic Toc”.

Hey people! 🙂

We haven’t listened to anything from Y Trwbz in a while, so let’s do it today. This song was released in 2015, when Mared Williams was with the band as the vocalist. Sadly, I don’t really have much of a clear idea what the song is about, so can’t share that with you, but still I think it’s great musically.

2002 – “Cariad” (Love).

Hey guys! 🙂

So yesterday I wrote about how this group’s music very often sounds kind of sensorily creepy to me, but the song by them that I’m going to share with you today sounds anything but creepy. What drew my attention to it is that it’s quite obviously inspired by the Welsh language, and as it seems especially the Welsh concept of cwtch. This enigmatically looking word, as you’ll figure out from the song, is pronounced cootch, and if we wanted to say what it means in English, we’d say a hug or a cuddle, except it’s something more than that. The situation here is very similar as with the Welsh word hiraeth, which is usually translated as longing, but the real feeling behind it is a lot more difficult to convey through English. If I understand it correctly, cwtch is a particularly safe, yet unreserved and containing type of hug, one you really invest yourself in. The cosy feeling behind it is kind of similar to the Danish hygge concept. But also, cwtch is a word that is particularly tied to the Welsh identity. I may well be wrong about it, and if I am and if there are any Welsh people that are gonna read it feel free to correct me (I don’t even live in Wales, after all), but I have a strong impression that while it’s both Welsh speakers and English-speaking Welsh people who use this word, it seems to be more frequently used by the latter, as a way of connecting with the language as part of their national identity even though they don’t speak it fluently or in daily life. I tend to hear it a lot more often when someone is speaking English, especially people from South Wales, so I have a feeling it’s more like a Wenglish word, especially that it actually comes from the Middle English word couche, meaning a resting or hiding place. The “tch” cluster is also not common in Welsh. Yet, somehow the cwtch is almost like a symbol of being Welsh, an essence of Welshness, and also one of the Welsh words that people from outside of Wales are most familiar with, if they’re familiar with any Welsh words. I guess only popty ping, meaning microwave, is more famous, except it doesn’t seem to really be in use, because the actual Welsh word for microwave is meicrodon. 😀 Kind of like with this village in Anglesey called Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch, which everyone calls just Llanfairpwllgwyngyll or simply Llanfair PG, and the sesquipedalian official name, from what I understand, is only used for the sake of tourists.

Anyway, as a Welsh learner, I thought it was really cool that this American band embraced even just these two Welsh words, cariad (love, sweetheart) and cwtch, because this is such a small, plus endangered language, so I figure it’s always somehow heartening with languages like that when someone knows even a word. I also really like the angelic vocals of Sarah Copus in this piece.

Mared – “Over Again”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I decided that we’d listen to a really stunning piece from Mared Williams, also known just as Mared. This is definitely one of my most favourite of her songs. It deals with the topic of moving away from where you grew up and used to live, but coming back there and trying to keep in touch with friends. Mared is originally from Llannefydd in north Wales, although as far as I know she now lives at least some of the time in London. She is also the vocalist in the Welsh rock group Y Trwbz, as has been one of my faza people – Jacob Elwy. – She’s also in a relationship with Morgan Elwy, Jacob’s brother, with whom she sometimes collaborates also outside of Y Trwbz. This song was produced by the Drwm recording studio, and people like Osian Huw Williams from the well-known on the Welsh-language scene band Candelas, or Branwen Haf Williams from Cowbois Rhos Botwnnog were involved in the recording.

Gwenan Gibbard – “Dod Dy Law” (Place Your Hand).

Hey people! 🙂

At the beginnings of my blog, one of the songs I shared with you was

Dod Dy Law

beautifully sung acapella by Gwilym Bowen Rhys, who’s of course one of my faza people. And then I think I also shared it sung by Siân James. I had very little idea about Welsh then, and didn’t know what the word “dod” was supposed to mean in this context, but now I know it means to put or place. Since then, I’ve also become familiar with Ffion from the Foxglove Trio, who has a blog where she writes about Welsh folk songs, and which I often find very useful. And she wrote

a post about this song.

It’s thanks to her that I finally learned what this song is about and I agree that it’s one of the saddest Welsh songs of those I’ve heard.

As it’s quite easy to figure out from the lyrics, the lyrical subject is addressing their former lover, by whom their heart has been broken.

The translated lyrics below are taken from Ffion’s website, who in turn got them from the website of Gwenan Gibbard, and they’ve been translated by Dafydd Ifan.

 

Place your hand, lest you believe,

On my breast, without hurting me,

If you listen, you may hear

The sound of my little heart breaking.

Oh my dearest, take a reed

And hold it at both ends,

Break it in half

Just as you broke my heart.

Heavy the lead, heavy the stones,

Heavy is the heart of all lonely people,

Heaviest of all, twixt sun and moon,

Is bidding farewell where there is love.

Plu – “Ar Garlam” (Galloping).

Hey people! 🙂

Today let’s listen to a song by Plu, from their album with children’s songs called Holl Anifeiliad y Goedwig (All Animals in the Forest). This is one of my favourite songs on this album musically, although my understanding of the lyrics is rather patchy so I can’t share any translation or anything like that with you.

Gwilym Bowen Rhys – “Hanes y Sesiwn yng Nghymru” (The Tale of the Session in Wales).

And for today, I chose a song from my other faza peep, Gwilym Bowen Rhys, from his album Detholiad O Hen Faledi I (A Selection of Welsh Ballads I). This is the first song on it, and one of a few quite hilarious ones on this album. It was written by the satirical poet and pamphleteer John Jones (1766-1821) better known under his bardic name Jac Glan-y-Gors, called so after his birth place, Glanygors in Denbighshire, and set to a traditional melody. It refers to the situation that happened in Wales after the Welsh act of union, when English became the official language of the country, but most people only spoke Welsh. The song takes place in 18th century when the linguistic situation is still the same. It tells the story of a rural Welsh court where people can’t really communicate effectively due to that barier, which the judge finds quite frustrating, and the whole thing is really comical.

Song of the day (22nd June) – Jacob Elwy ft. Rhydian Meilir – “Brenhines Aberdaron” (Queen of Aberdaron).

Time for a song from Jacob Elwy, who, as you probably know if you’ve been here for a while, is my current faza peep! 🙂 This song is actually a very interesting poem, written by RS Thomas, a Welsh anglican priest, and first performed by Rhydian Meilir, with whom Jacob has collaborated a fair bit so far and who has wrote lyrics for many of his solo songs. In Jacob’s version, we can still hear Rhydian Meilir in the chorus.

Aberdaron is a village on the Llyn Peninsula in Gwynedd, Wales, apparently a very beautiful one. And who is the queen of Aberdaron? Her name was Cissie Morris, but she was known as Auntie Sis in her local community and the congregation and chapel she attended. She died in February 2015 at the age of 88. From what I can understand from the song and what I have read, her life sounds very difficult. She was married to John Morris who was head teacher of the local school, and who died in 1977 trying to save one of his pupils – David Alun – who was caught by a rising tide. Neither of them survived. She also lost his son and grandson in some cruel way, but despite that she was very kind. Sadly, I don’t understand the entire song, even the written lyrics, so I wasn’t able to translate it.

Question of the day (17th June).

What is your biggest non-academic, non work-related accomplishment?

My answer:

Well, I think that would be my language learning achievements, especially when it comes to English and Welsh, as with Swedish I had a tutor for a long time so you could say it was kinda academic, but with English and Welsh I’ve been doing it mostly by myself. I did of course have English throughout my formal education, but, as I said many times before, I don’t feel like I learned anything more than just the basics this way, and anything else I wanted to achieve, I had to take care of myself, and only reached fluency in my last years of schooling when I had plenty of time to work on my English as I first had a year of individual education and then did schoolwork part-time and mostly from home. With Welsh, even though I don’t feel fluent yet at all, it feels like even more of an accomplishment because, even though I’m not fluent, I sort of doubted I could achieve even the level I’m at now, given the limited resources and their frequently limited accessibility and/or availability where I live.

You? 🙂

Gwenan Gibbard – “Lliw Gwyn Rhosyn Yr Haf” (White Colour Of A Summer Rose).

Today, I want to share with you another version of a traditional song that I previously shared with you on here, this time a more acoustic one from the harpist Gwenan Gibbard. I think this is the first tune by her that I’m sharing where she’s also singing. For more background information about this song, you can click the link below, where I shared the

version by the band Pendevig,

with one of my faza peeps – Gwilym Bowen Rhys – and Bethan Rhiannon as vocalists.

While obviously I really like both versions or otherwise I wouldn’t be sharing them here, I think I lean more towards the Pendevig one, as, in my opinion, it shows its spirit better, and also, well, fazas are fazas, Gwilym rules! But the big pluses of Gwenan Gibbard’s interpretation are that it’s more traditional, and, of course, features the harp.

Question of the day.

What are you in the 1% of?

My answer:

I hardly care about percentages, but let’s think… The first thing that springs to my mind is that (touch wood) I’ve never really had a proper cavity, despite my dental hygiene being rather crappy most of the time and not caring overly about what I eat. My Mum says it’s a miracle, I’m more inclined to think it’s genetics ’cause my whole family have very healthy teeth. The reason why this springs to my mind first is that I recently actually chipped my tooth slightly, but at the same time must have been badly enough that it hurt. It wasn’t a terrible pain, but rather annoying and wouldn’t go away for about two weeks so I was rather concerned. I guess it’s now gotten used to being chipped ’cause it now only hurts very very slightly and occasionally and the dentist didn’t even see any problem with it on an X-ray, but I got quite freaked out by how suddenly and easily it chipped and didn’t know what was going on. At the same time, strangely enough, my other teeth also became temporarily more sensitive so I was seriously wondering whether perhaps my lucky time is over and now my teeth are decaying all at once. 😀 Which is a real scary prospect when you’re emetophobic, hate gagging and having things in your mouth which is unavoidable at the dentist’s. So I had a full mouth X-ray to see what’s going on in there and both the X-ray technician and then my dentist couldn’t stop saying how healthy my teeth are and how they’d like all their patients to have such teeth as me. 😀 Back when I was going to school and when my emetophobia was bad enough that I really struggled brushing my teeth, whenever we were told that we’d be having a dental checkup, which we’d typically learn right before it was about to happen, I’d just brush my teeth beforehand or if there wasn’t enough time just run to the loo and scrape my teeth with my finger until they felt smoother, and the dentist’s reaction was always the same: “Wow, you have very healthy teeth!” I’m so freakin’ grateful for it, I seriously feel for any people out there who are emetophobic or have other phobias that get in the way of dentist appointments and who have more trouble with their teeth. Or maybe life is merciful enough that bad teeth plus emetophobia just don’t happen together? Still, the whole experience and the fear around it did set my phobia back a fair bit. Which also means that again I have to take a break from working on my post about all things emetophobia ’cause I don’t want to make it even worse.

So yeah, I don’t know how many people don’t develop cavities, and also it still might happen to me, although obviously I really really hope it won’t, but still it seems like I’m in the minority.

Another thing is I often wonder how many people in Poland can communicate in Welsh on any level, and I’m actually very curious. Of course it’s a minority language to begin with and I don’t even know what percentage of people worldwide can speak it. What I’m even more curious of is, if we exclude any potential Welsh natives or Welsh people who acquired it later in life and can use it to some extend, who may live in Poland, and people of any other nationalities who were born in Wales and acquired the language there (or perhaps in Patagonia where it’s also spoken), and any Polish people who learned the language to whatever degree in an academic setting (you can study it here at one or two universities) or while living in Wales (there’s a big Polish minority), how many people are left who can speak it? Is my family very far off in thinking that it’s just Bibielle? 😀 I’d like to know if there are other people in this country who are learning it like me – non-academically and plain because they like it, without ever having been there, having family there or anything like that. – If I’m the only one, it’s cool because it’s quite hilarious as I’d be literally one in like 38 millions, lol, but it would be just as cool if there were other such weird individuals here ’cause the more the merrier, at least this is the case when we’re talking about an extinct language. I’ll surely be even more of a phenomenon when I start learning Sami or Frisian, as, as far as I know, there’s no way to study these languages here in Poland. I hope I can do this.

AVPD is quite rare, or at least rarely diagnosed, can’t remember how many percent now, if I ever knew it to begin with, but maybe it could be around 1%. Actually in Poland alone it’s very possible. Then I am also a synaesthete, and one of the types of synaesthesia I experience is lexical-gustatory, which is apparently the most rare. Google claims there are 2-4% of synaesthetes so perhaps this could count.

I’m also such a strange peep who hardly ever feels any smells unless very strong and chemical ones, and even then it’s more like I feel them at the back of my throat rather than in the nose, yet at the same time I can’t say I have any problems with taste and flavour, or if I do it’s towards the other extreme that I guess I’m overly sensitive to some flavours. I have totally no idea why that is, I know there’s such a thing as hyposmia/anosmia where you have little to no sense of smell but I guess those people don’t experience flavours either, plus these are medical conditions as far as I know and I can’t really say my smell anomaly impacts me in any negative way, I’d rather say it’s the opposite ’cause I don’t have to feel all the yucky smells of this world and don’t miss the beautiful ones as I don’t know/can’t recall them.

Also I don’t like some things which most people seem to like and it’s hard to find someone who doesn’t. For example I dislike Harry Potter. Not just because it’s not okay with my religion, but it just totally doesn’t interest me, I don’t like most of the modern fantasy genre I suppose. Same about Star Wars. Or Twilight, and all the other vampire stuff. I actually did give Twilight a fair chance and I totally see why people may find it appealing, but don’t share the excitement and don’t want to. I don’t like a lot of books that normal people do, or at least don’t see anything special in them.

Oh yeah , and on another note, I don’t like pizza. Don’t hate it, but don’t like it either, and it seems to be a very unpopular opinion, at least among people I know.

How about you? 🙂

Gwilym Bowen Rhys – “Garth Celyn”.

For today, I have an incredibly interesting song for you! It was written by Gwilym together with his mum – Siân – for Cân I Gymru 2012, and it’s about real people from Wales history.

I think I mentioned some time ago on here that I was reading “Here Be Dragons” by Sharon Kay Penman – a historical novel about the Welsh prince Llywelyn (or Llewelyn) Fawr (Llywelyn the Great) which focused very strongly on his relationship with his wife Joan, known in Welsh as Siwan, daughter of king John of England.

Part of why I really wanted to read this book was that I was already introduced to their story by this song, and it really describes it in such a way that you want to learn more, at least that was the case with me, though surely the fact that Gwilym has been one of my faza people had something to say in it as well. I really like the way it’s written, with a lot of understanding of Siwan’s situation and what she might have felt at the time.

Its name, Garth Celyn, comes from what is the most likely site of their palace, this is a place in Gwynedd, whose name may apparently be translated to Holly Enclosure.

While the song has been written from Siwan’s perspective, it’s also cool that you can just as well see it from Llywelyn’s perspective.

The lyrics, as well as English translation and a slightly more detailed background of this song, are in the description of the video.

Plu – “Ambell I Gan” (An Occasional Song).

Hiya people! 🙂

For today I chose one of the songs by Plu from their album “Tir A Golau” (Land And Lights), which is definitely one of my most favourites from that album. This is the only traditional song on it, and I’ve come across quite a few different renditions of it ever since I’ve started to listen to Welsh music more seriously and learning the language. But Plu’s arrangement is definitely the best I’ve heard, I love absolutely everything about it! The lyrics are great too, capturing it very well how inspiring music can be. I’ve found an English translation of the Welsh lyrics, which has been written by

Richard B. Gillion.

An occasional song will keep my breast

From sinking down under the frequent wave;

The muse is so cheerful,

so attractive, so pure,

I give heart-felt thanks

for an occasional song.

An occasional to song

as the night turns dark,

So light is the day, so cheerful the rose,

Misty, hopeless clouds – like wool

They turn, if I can

get an occasional song.

An occasional song

gives strength in the limb,

And the shoulder to carry

many a burden,

And the force of difficulties

to be crushed completely

If I can get to sing an occasional song.

An occasional song I will get in the world,

But I travel to a land

which is all singing,

And after I leave the desert completely

I hope to get to sing,

not an occasional song.

Plu – “Ambell I Gan”.

Song of the day (27th May) – “Gwilym Bowen Rhys – “Clychau’r Gog” (Bluebells).

Hey people! 🙂

I wanted to share with you something by Gwilym today (or rather yesterday, but yesterday was quite chaotic so I didn’t manage in the end) and was very surprised to realise that I’ve never shared this one with you before, because it’s definitely one of my most favourite songs from his last album – “Arenig”. – It is one of the more contemporary-sounding songs on this album. I like how it’s so calmly joyful and thus makes an interesting contrast with the preceding

“Lloer Dirion Lliw’r Dydd” (Gentle Moon, Colour Of The Day),

which is also a love song, and also one of my most favourite songs on this album, but feels so vastly different, being a much older composition and filled with anguish. Yet they both fit in there perfectly and the contrast probably just shows the beauty of each of them even more.

The song I want to show you today was originally composed and written by Gwilym and has really beautiful and captivating lyrics, although even I – being just a Welsh learner – can see that they sound way more natural in their actual language than any English translation would. Welsh is just so much better for this kind of thing. The translation is also Gwilym’s, and comes from

Gwilym’s website.

The sun was insisting that it was Summer,

and the blue-green path was inviting us,

and we heard the gentle bells of May

calling to us both.

She was the very essence of Spring,

and her conversation was a lovely, careless song.

And a feeling came over me, the like I’d never felt before,

like a fire under my skin.

A fire from my head to my feet,

her smile quickening the blood,

on the edge of the sea of blue bells.

Concealing the truth behind half a smile,

and longing for her tender embrace.

Concealing love behind sarcastic words,

and my life between her finger and thumb.

Every doubt had long since fled,

and the yearning was a rushing torrent,

to swim the sea of blue bells.

No one was an ear nor a witness, only leaves,

no one was an eye, except for the sun,

no one there but her and me;

the only people in the world.

And then we plunged deep into the wave;

one moment that lasted a whole year,

into the depths of a sea of blue bells.

To stay in her embrace was to prove a false hope,

a dream in vain.

And I hear the gentle bells of May

sighing a farewell to us both.

But I’ll keep this safe in the chamber of my heart:

the moment that lasted a whole year,

and I’ll remember this as long as I possess a memory;

holding her in a sea of blue bells.

Morgan Elwy – “Dal Yn Dyn” (Still A Man).

Hey people! 🙂

Recently, I shared with you a song from Jacob Elwy,

“Pan Fyddai’n 80 Oed” (When I’ll Be 80),

and in that post I mentioned his younger brother – Morgan Elwy – and his victory in this year’s Cân I Gymru (Song For Wales) in March. Even before Cân I Gymru, it was known that Morgan was going to release a new album some time later this spring. And it came out on May 7, if I remember correctly.

Even though I don’t love Morgan’s music quite as much as I do Jacob’s, or their band Y Trŵbz, or Mared’s (Mared Williams, in case you don’t remember, is a solo singer as well as vocalist with Y Trŵbz, whose music I’ve shared on here a couple times, she’s also Morgan’s girlfriend), I still do like it and I was really looking forward to this and very curious about this album for several reasons. One is simply that Jacob is my current major

faza,

and when I have a faza on someone, I’m also definitely going to be interested if their family are doing something musically and generally in anything that pertains to my faza people even indirectly, and another reason is that Morgan is very strongly into reggae music and that was what this album was to be all about, and I have a bit of a sentiment for this genre. I don’t listen to it very regularly nowadays, but there was a time when I was a kid when it was my favourite genre (though I mostly listened to our Polish reggae) and I still have a bit of a bond with this music and appreciate it and like to come back to it when I’m in the mood. I also really love checking out reggae in other languages which are not necessarily strongly associated with this genre. And, while I dare say that I have a pretty good idea about current Welsh-language music scene, especially so for an outsider, haha, I don’t really know a lot of Welsh-language reggae music, the only person who makes it (aside from Morgan, obviously) that I know of is Geraint Jarman – who was also featured on this blog years ago, including a couple of his reggae songs. –

So the album is out now, it’s called Teimlor’ Awen (Feeling The Muse it means, I believe), it was produced by Bryn Rock which is Jacob and Morgan’s own record label. I thought after his winning Cân I Gymru, Y Trŵbz having won the Y Selar (Welsh music magazine) award, and Mared being well-known on the Welsh-language music scene, the Welsh Internet would be bursting with reviews, but somehow haven’t come across any yet.

I listened to it thoroughly two times and it’s in my huge Bibiel’s playlist so I also listened to all the songs onn it individually a few more times, and, yeah… The fact that I put it in my Bibiel’s playlist and that I’m sharing a song from it here speaks for itself that I generally like it. Maybe it’s not necessarily what I would call right up Bibiel’s alley, something that would particularly speak to me or anything like that, but it’s still really good and nice to listen to, with a great vibe to it. It’s also very catchy but not in an obnoxious or unoriginal way, rather, such that makes it very approachable and accessible even if you don’t know the language, I would say, and also I think it may appeal to people who don’t necessarily care for reggae very much. It’s just easy to like imo, while definitely having its character at the same time. These two qualities don’t often go well.

Apart from making music, Morgan studied physics in Manchester, where at the time he was also part of a very interesting student band Lucy Lagoon, where he played bass and sang. I discovered Lucy Lagoon relatively recently and I really do like their music, it’s like a fusion of indie rock and reggae and some other music influences. He’s also been a physics teacher in the north of London, and, as you might already remember from my blog, he also plays bass in Y Trŵbz. I generally get a bit of an impression that he is into a lot of things, plus also draws from very diverse music styles, which is cool ’cause I like versatile people.

The song I chose to share with you from this album is called “Dal Yn Dyn” (wasn’t courageous enough to translate the lyrics by ear) and, as throughout this entire album, you can also hear his younger sister – Mali’s – backing vocals. The song is not on Youtube, so I’m sharing it from Spotify and for those of you who don’t have Spotify but have something else I’ll include a link to Songwhip below.

Morgan Elwy – “Dal Yn Dyn”.

Jacob Elwy – “Pan Fyddai’n 80 Oed” (When I Will Be 80).

Hey all you people! 🙂

Time for what currently Bibiels like best in terms of music – something from Jacob Elwy! – Yayy!

If you still don’t know who Jacob Elwy is – he is my new faza subject or faza peep, and if you don’t know what is faza either you can find out

 

here.

So, over the last few months since the start of my faza on Jacob, I’ve shared with you some music from Y Trŵbz, (the band where he’s been the vocalist) and also a piece sung by Jacob together with Mared Williams for Cân i Gymru (Song For Wales) 2019. But I’ve never shared with you any of his solo music yet. Admittedly, there’s not much of it so far, just some singles, but they’re all really worth listening to (or otherwise I wouldn’t have the faza).

Interestingly, Jacob took part in Cân i Gymru twice in a row -first together with Mared, and the second time with Rhydian Meilir accompanying him on piano. – Rhydian Meilir is also the one who composed and wrote the lyrics to both his Cân i Gymru songs as well as most of his other solo songs that have been released.

I really regret that: a. I didn’t follow Cân i Gymru during those two years and b. that I didn’t know about Jacob back then. As it happened, this year it was Jacob’s younger brother – Morgan – who took part in Cân i Gymru and won it with his reggae tune “Bach O Bach O Hwne” (A Bit A Bit Of That). He has quite a few siblings, and they’re a very strongly musically inclined, and I’m curious if all of them will now take part in Cân i Gymru, that would be really interesting! 😀 I have no doubt that it’s mostly due to my zealous crossing fingers (out of pure loyalty which I always have for my faza peeps and which also extends to other people connected with them), following Cân i Gymru at the time while it was happening and putting all my energy into it that made his song win. 😀 To be totally honest, I didn’t love Morgan’s song all that much, although I didn’t dislike it either, it just didn’t speak to me quite as much as Jacob’s both Cân i Gymru songs did (they both won the 2nd place), but that’s just me and my style and I can see beyond it, especially as someone who used to be quite keen on reggae once upon a time, that objectively it was a really cool song and very much a breath of fresh air for the Welsh music scene, which doesn’t have a lot of reggae music enthusiasts like him, or at least I don’t know many.

I don’t always love the lyrics like these, which I call half-ironically “inspirational”, because they can sound quite cliche and as someone who is picky and likes quirky lyrics, I can’t possibly like cliche lyrics at the same time. These, unfortunately, are a little bit on the cliche side, but I don’t care. Probably because it took me some time to actually understand them fully, not just the gist, and over that time I’ve already grown to like this song because it’s really really good musically in my opinion. The first time I heard it was on BBC Radio Cymru (or was it Cymru FM?) half-asleep, when I was having a migraine, and I remember vaguely thinking that I really like it. I only much later learned who sings it and that some small part of why I like it is because, in this song, Jacob’s voice sounds particularly similar to my late friend Jacek from Helsinki’s singing voice, which I believe was why I originally got this faza.

And, regarding these lyrics, yes, they may be slightly cliche, but they’re true. I often hear this song in my brain when I feel depressed and unmotivated and have no energy for my Welsh learning, and then I often find the motivation, because it makes me think – gosh, I still have so much to learn, it would be so frustrating if I were 80 and suddenly realised that I could have learnt many more languages, or learnt the one I know a lot better than I do, but didn’t, just because I gave in too often when I wasn’t doing well mentally or my linguistic progress wasn’t going quite as smoothly as I’d ideally like. On a different note, I dearly hope I won’t have to live this long. So, yes, it actually is kind of inspirational and motivating for me.

I’m also super happy because I managed to translate these lyrics, as they are quite easy! I’m sure my translation is not perfect, a bit unpolished in places and sometimes I didn’t know what some little words literally meant in English but overall I’m quite proud of the result.

 

When I will be 80

I want to look back and smile

At the foolish things I did

When I was young

When I will be 80

I don’t want to be overwhelmed by the pain

Of regretting the things I didn’t do

When I could

And when I will be 80

I want to hold you

Knowing that our love

Has overcome everything

But don’t hold back

You have nothing to lose

Life is too short to

Keep turning around

And when I will be 80

Grateful for having a family

Who are always there for me, still

And are like a strong rock

Don’t hold back

You have nothing to lose

Remember that it is yourself

who limits you

And don’t say „There’s always tomorrow”

Raise and go for it

Before it’s too late

Raise and go for it

Before you will be 80