Declan Galbraith – “How Could An Angel Break My Heart?”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I’d like to share with you a song from Declan’s second album – “Thank You” – which was released in 2006, when he was 15. As a lot of the songs on this album, this is a cover. This song was originally sung by Toni Braxton, who sang it from a female perspective and if I’m totally honest with you, I find her version quite horrible. Cant say if I just really don’t like Toni Braxton or whether this song is somehow spectacularly bad in the original, probably both. 😀

Generally, I think if I came across this song for the first time these days, and not when I was 14, I suppose I wouldn’t like Declan’s version veery much either. Not because it’s bad, but I just think it wouldn’t make much of an impression on me these days, and it’s so very emo. If I were to hear it for the first time ever today, I’m afraid I’d probably classify it as a typical “bed song” – you know, the kind of stuff someone might listen to in bed, in the middle of a rainy day, hidden under a blanket, when they’re having a really emotional day, naturally because they’d just broken up with someone. – So I’m glad I actually did discover it earlier and now have good associations with it, Declan having been one of my faza people.

I do like how expressive his interpretation is, he does a great job at it. I just have a hard time relating to this song I guess as romantic love isn’t something I’ve experienced, plus the lyrical subject of this song sounds like someone very possessive if not a little toxic.

Regardless, like I said, I think Declan does it really well and totally defeats Toni Braxton imo.

Georgia Ruth – “7 Rooms”.

Hey people! 🙂

The song for today comes from Georgia Ruth’s latest album – “Mai” (which means May, as I’m sure you can figure out) – and I think is one of my favourite songs from this release. In 2017, Georgia Ruth – who is in relationship with Iwan Huws from the band Cowbois Rhos Botwnnog whose one song I shared on here before too – gave birth to a son (and of course, the baby namer and name nerd in me is super curious what his name is, as I’m always into how people name their babies, and I’ve noticed that British folk singers often have fabulous ideas in this department, 😀 but I don’t think they felt like sharing this information with the whole huge world which is absolutely understandable). Anyways, this song is one of a few on this album which have been inspired by her motherhood. It’s about her hospital stay after childbirth and feeling quite lost in there, I suppose as much emotionally in the new situation as literally in all those rooms and other complex structures hospitals tend to have. I like how it starts of a bit depressive and confused, and then becomes more joyous and hopeful.

Question of the day.

What is the weirdest thing you have ever heard in a public place?

My answer:

I like to eavesdrop on people’s conversations discretely, but the only thing I can think of right now is from a few years back when we were at the beach, or actually walking back to the car from it, and we were passing two young people, a girl and a boy, who in turn were walking towards the beach. That is when I learned that north is actually west in English. Like, the word for west is “north”. 😀 My Mum doesn’t know English beyond some words and phrases she has passively absorbed from TV, music, technology, Sofi’s exercise books, me etc. but even she knows what north and west means in English and both of us were quite amused. These people could be like uni age or older, so they definitely must have had English at school and surely would already have covered things like directions, which, if I remember correctly, people normally learn in third grade in primary or so. That might give you a bit of an idea about the level of foreign language education in Polish schools, and how much attention is paid to people actually retaining and being able to use what they learn. The school way of teaching languages is pretty tragic, uninteresting and severely lacking in creativity. So I can’t even blame people. Of course student involvement is key too, but you won’t get a student involved if you won’t interest them with your subject, and few teachers care about that. My Sofi says it all the time that she is intimidated to say in her English class that she doesn’t understand something ’cause the teacher will be like “*sighs* But Sofi, what do you still not understand? I have already explained it!” It seems like most of her class must have some understanding problems as the vast majority takes extracurricular private lessons at a language school, which of course are paid. People who actually are interested for some reason (like this Bibiel here happened to be) are bored to tears in class and need to do everything on their own if they want to progress, which, I can imagine, can be discouraging for many, in fact, I myself started to dislike English as a subject quite early on, and wasn’t far from disliking it as a language at some point.

You? 🙂

Declan Galbraith – “Danny Boy”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I’d like to share with you a piece from another of my faza people – Declan Galbraith, these days also known as Child of Mind. – This song, however, was sung by him long before the Child of Mind project, as it’s from his very first, self-titled album from 2002, which he recorded at the age of 10. Some songs on it are original material, but mostly they’re covers of either pop classics or, as in this case, quite well-known Celtic folk songs. Declan definitely has a special relationship with Celtic music, even if it’s less apparent in his later music. This is because he is of both Irish and Scottish descent, and his grandfather – affectionately called Poppy Ben by Declan – with whom he had a very close relationship because he was looked after by his grandparents a lot as a child; played several instruments in a Celtic music bands, and would often take Declan along on rehearsals and concerts.

“Danny Boy” was written at the beginning of 20th century by an English lawyer and lyricist, Frederic Weatherly. He was introduced to the song “Londonderry Air” by his sister, and set this new song of his to its melody. It is not known how exactly this song should be interpreted and what the author had in mind writing it, but what comes to mind for many people is that it’s from the perspective of a parent, whose son is leaving home for war or an uprising, which makes sense to me.

Enya – “I Could Never Say Goodbye”.

Hi guys! 🙂

Yes, another Enya’s song, and another about goodbyes! I couldn’t possibly say which one I like more. This one, as it’s easy to figure out, is about loss of a loved one. According to what Enya has said about this song it’s mostly about a loss due to death. I think she captured the essence of what it feels like very well in this song.

Enya – “Someone Said Goodbye”.

Hi guys! 🙂

Today I’m sharing with you another Enya song, this time from her album Amarantine. According to her lyricist – Roma Ryan – this song is about that moment of the day, at the end of it, when we start to reflect on our lives and all the saddest times come up in our memory, bringing sad feelings. This is an awful feeling, but I think this is the best song to listen to when it happens to make you realise more clearly that everyone goes through things like this, in some way, and you’re not alone.

Enya – “Hope Has A Place”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I’d like to share with you another song from Enya. Roma Ryan (Enya’s lyricist) wrote the lyrics to it in Silent Valley in the Mourne Mountains, , co. Down, for her daughter Ebony, about first love, but also love in general and how it’s not only and not always an amazing feeling like we would all like to believe, but it also often brings a lot of pain, or even loss. But the thing you still have left is hope.

Enya decided that, in order to write just the right melody for these lyrics, she’d also need to go to the same place (I really like that approach and I think it seriously makes sense because places  always have their own spirit). Not only did she write the melody there, but also her producer – Nicky Ryan – decided that they’d record the lead vocal there, outside, which I think gives this piece even more of a soul. I think it’s actually the melody that I love the most about this piece.

Clannad – “Vellum”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Recently I shared with you all a piece from Clannad’s debut album, and now I thought I would share a piece from their last album, which was released in 2013, after I believe a fifteen-year break since the release of Landmarks. I think comparing these two pieces and their style shows quite well how Clannad has evolved over all those years since its beginning.

Rachel Sermanni – “Eggshells”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Today, I have for you a song from this really interesting Scottish singer. I’ve known this particular song for quite some time, but I’ve been listening to more of Rachel Sermanni’s music lately and exploring it. She is from the Scottish highlands and is of Italian descent, and what I find particularly interesting about her music is that I’ve read she’s often inspired by her dreams when creating it.

Declan Galbraith – “Moody Blues”.

Hey people! 🙂

A moody blues is what my Sofi seems to be having right now, so it made me think of this song and I thought why not share it with you. Funny how the album from which it comes from (You and Me) was released in her birth year and how at the time Declan was almost her age. 😀

So You And Me was Declan’s third album, which he released at the age of 14, and it was also the last album of his that he released under his real name. While he is known for covering a lot of pop and rock classics, this seems to be his original song, although I’ve no clue if he wrote it himself or if someone wrote it for him. The title quite surely comes partly from The Moody Blues – the Birmingham 60’s rock band – which he likes and has covered their song Nights In White Satin on his second album.

Pleun – “Writings On The Wall”.

Hi people! 🙂

I’ve shared a lot of folk and Celtic music with you lately, so today, for a change, let’s listen to this young Dutch singer. Pleun (or Pleun Bierbooms) was the winner of the 7th season of The Voice of Holland. I do think she is really good. This is her cover of Sam Smith’s “Writings On The Wall”, which, in its original version, was featured in The Spectre – a James Bond film. – I think I like her version more.

Trwbadwr – “Feel So Close”.

Hiya people! 🙂

Okay, so time for some Jacob music again, finally. 🙂 If you’re new or still don’t know for some other reason, I have such a great thing in my life called faza, and my current dominant faza subject is Jacob Elwy Williams.

If you’ve heard about Jacob already on here, you’ll know that he’s been the vocalist in a rock band called Y Trŵbz. But I didn’t say that, at the very beginnings, before it was called Y Trŵbz, before Mared Williams joined them as another vocalist and long before they have become more widely known in Wales thanks to Y Selar (Welsh music magazine) they were called Trwbadwr. They weren’t really officially recording back then, just gigging or jamming for fun I believe, as it often seems to be with young Welsh-language bands when they start out. However, recently I was thinking that I should still see if there perhaps is some of their music from that time somewhere online, just out of my insatiable, Aquarian curiosity, because I really wanted to know how, or if, their style has changed over the years, and… you know, when you like someone’s music, it’s great to be able to hear some of their earlier, unofficial, perhaps even more amateur music. It just gives you a broader idea about them and their music. I’ll never forget my excitement when I found out about the first recording ever of Cornelis Vreeswijk – one of my previous faza people – from 1959, so I guess about 5 years before his actual career as a musician started, if I’m counting right. And so I looked, and the song I’m about to share with you is the only thing I found from Trwbadwr, but there’s also an unfinished version of it on YouTube as well and it’s also great.

As you can maybe guess from the title alone, this is their cover of Feel So Close by Calvin Harris. I quite like this song in its original version even though it’s mainstream-y and thus rather very normal for Bibiel standards 😀 but I like theirs far more (not surprising I guess). 🙂

Rachel Newton – “Proud Maisrie”.

Hey people! 🙂

A song I have for you today comes from Scottish singer and harpist Rachel Newton, whose music has already been featured on here a few times. This song is her rendition of a traditional ballad, which is also known under several other titles as far as I’m aware. I really like the way she did it. I believe Maisrie is a spelling variation of Maisery, as in Child’s ballad Lady Maisery and the folk group Lady Maisery who are named after that ballad.

Órla Fallon – “My Forever Friend”.

Hey people! 🙂

A song that I’d like to share with you today comes from Irish singer and harpist, perhaps most known for being a former member of Celtic Woman, but who has also released several solo albums – Órla Fallon. – I love her angelic vocals and her harp play. She is also Christian, or clearly seems to be, considering that she has recorded quite a lot of Christian songs and Christmas carols. This song also reflects it very well.

While, to be honest, it doesn’t resonate all that much with me musically as a lot of Órla’s other music does, there’s too much country feel in it for me on this whole album, the way she sings it is so heartfelt, and the lyrics are lovely and of course very relatable for all Christians, if also a little childish, which in my opinion only gives them more charm. So all that makes me really like this little tune and I think a lot of Christians may feel the same. It was written by a British teacher – Charles Alexander Landsborough.

Reasons why I love Polish.

If any of you have been reading my blogfrom it’s early months, you might recall a post I wrote about all the

reasons why I’m learning Welsh

that I could come up with. It was a translated post from my previous, Polish blog, and I wrote it because pretty much every single person whom I mentioned it to would ask me this question as either the first, or the second one, right after “Isn’t it an English dialect?” 😀 and because, well, as you can see in that post, there are very many reasons.

I enjoyed writing that post and it got a lot more attention than I thought it would, so the next year I also wrote about

reasons why I’m learning Swedish

and last year

reasons why I’m learning English.

I haven’t started learning any new language since then (even though some people seem to believe that I start learning a new one every month, haha), and I think it’ll be a while yet until I do, but although my language bucket list is long, I’m not rushing anywhere. And, there’s still one language that I know that I think also deserves its own post, even though I’m not learning it. Well, I am technically, but since I’m a native, it’s a different kind of learning, of course. And obviously as you can figure out of the title, or even if you know about me, this language is Polish. I was a little hesitant about writing this post however, even though I was thinking from the beginning of this yearly language series that I should do it. Of course I love Polish, and in a way it’s a more special relationship than with any other of my languages, but, because it’s always been a part of my life and not really as a result of my own, conscious choice as is the case with the others, I thought it would be harder to come up with as many reasons. As someone who hates anything to do with math, I always tend to appreciate quality over quantity, but I wouldn’t like this post to stand out as the shortest of the whole series, that would be sad and unfair, even if just in my opinion.

I shared the dilemma with my Mum, who rightly noticed that it would be much more sad and unfair if I didn’t write it at all. And that perhaps the reasons as such will speak louder here than their amount would. That was a very fair point to me, so that’s why I am writing this post today, after all.

Here are all the reasons why I love Polish:

   1.

It is, like I said earlier, my mother tongue, so, in a way, I have even more of a connection with it than any other of my languages. It was the first language that sparked the love for language in my brain, I mean language in general, as a phenomenon, linguistics. It made me fall in love with words, my synaesthetic associations with them, it showed me how fun it is to play with words and expand your vocabulary. I love it because it’s the language in which I communicate with people I love – my family. – And because learning it made me more able and open to learn other languages later on.

   2.

Like all my languages. It is plain beautiful. While other Slavic languages aren’t among my most most most favourites (I do like them a lot, they are super cool and very charming but they aren’t in that MOST group), I strongly believe that even if it wasn’t my mother tongue, I’d still end up loving Polish, I don’t know how I could not.

   3.

While I’m not inclined to brag like some of us like to do that our language is the most difficult in the world (it depends on what you’re starting with, and there are much, much more complex languages out there), Polish does have a rather complex grammatical structure when compared to English, and – if you can ever be objective about such things – I’d say it’s also more complex phonetically than all the languages I’ve learnt so far. That makes me lucky, because the more difficult language you’re starting with, the easier you’ll likely find learning other languages, because you may be familiar with their trickier bits already from your mother tongue. I don’t have to be scared of languages with genuses or cases, for example, and arduously try to conceptualise them, because I already know what they are all about, now I just have to figure out how they apply to the language I’m learning and what differences there are compared to what I’m used to. And while picking up phonetics of foreign languages seems to be more of an individual trait, I think it does help me with it that, in my mother tongue, there are sounds which can hardly be differentiated from each other by a non-native even though they are different (see ś and sz, ć and cz etc.).

   4.

There is a lot of great Polish literature. I don’t know much about how much of it gets translated to other languages and which ones most often, but given that most countries are largely focused either on writing their own literature, or translating things from English, and the Anglophone world doesn’t seem to translate a lot, if I lived anywhere else and didn’t speak Polish, I probably wouldn’t get to know books by people who are now my favourite Polish authors.

   5.

Some of the swearwords and expletives are priceless. See my post

about gingerbread,

for example, if you want to learn more.

   6.

It has loads of amusing idioms. And lots of such that are very straightforward and to the point, and lots of such that I just love the sound of.

7.

The archaic Polish language. While I think it’s very true that a language is alive as long as it’s changing, because we are always changing and the times are always changing so it would be weird if the language wouldn’t, hence I don’t understand people who are all against slang, loanwords and other such things, I think it would be fun if we talked more like we used to, used more of that vocabulary we no longer do. Or, why the heck did we stop using initial stress in words to replace it with a paroxytone stress? I guess only highlanders speak with an initial syllable stress now, and I like that because it makes them sound like Finns. 😀 Or I hate that we stopped using long and short vowels because that makes the prosody of a language feel more interesting. I love love love reading older Polish books where there are words that we no longer use, some that I don’t even really get and I love learning what they mean and feeling them. People used to have such a delicious way of writing, even at the beginning of the 20th century, not to mention earlier. I feel like it often gets lost now. I say delicious because one of the synaesthesias I have is lexical-gustatory and while words almost always have some sort of a taste and it’s not like the modern Polish language doesn’t and like there aren’t any delicious words in it (far from it), it’s just that more archaic Polish language tends to have something very specific about its taste as a whole, that I really like. My Mum has also always loved reading books written in an archaic or obsolete language, so I guess it must be genetic. She especially has a lot of prayer books from like even before WWI I guess, when even the spelling was different and we used y instead of j, or my grandma has a cook book from the end of 19th century. I just love things like these!

8.

Dialects. You may perhaps remember from my post about English, that I wrote about Polish being a fairly unified language in terms of accent, especially when compared to English. However, there still are some slight variations to how people speak in different regions and it’s interesting to observe. There are also some dialects. I don’t necessarily have to love all of them as such in terms of whether they appeal to me aesthetically, but I love that the ones that exist still do, that we have some linguistic diversity (although I wish there was more or at least that it would be more pronounced), and although I myself don’t speak any dialect or don’t have a particularly distinguishable accent (despite being half-Kashub, and Kashubian is classified as a minority language but I can hardly understand it let alone speak it), I am very easily driven up the wall by people saying things like that it is not “elegant” to speak in a dialect, for example. I do think it’s a good skill to have to be able to speak your language in some universal, standard way that is often considered more formal, but being disapproving of someone speaking in a different way is not only discriminatory but also kind of smothering a person’s identity, and I guess that’s one of the reasons why it bothers me so much whenever I come across such an attitude.

   9.

Words that are untranslatable to other languages that I know. I am always interested in the concept of untranslatable words, in any language, and the ideas behind them, how you can express sometimes some incredibly complex ideas using one word in one language, but in another, one sentence may sometimes be too little. A very good example of a Polish word that is untranslatable to English is kombinować, which also happens to be a word that I really like and which, as many Poles think, reflects our resourcefulness as a nation. 😀 Yes, there is combine, and kombinować absolutely can mean combine, but it also has another definition. It is something you do when you have a problem that you need to resolve, but there’s no straight way out of it and it needs first a lot of thinking and then coming up with some unconventional work-around strategy, which sometimes may not be the most honest one. Both the thinking process and then carrying your idea out is what kombinować means. When it is dishonest, you could of course say it’s plain cheating but cheating feels a LOT more weighty and negative, and also kombinować is more colloquial, plus kombinować may, but doesn’t have to include, any cheating. It could be coming up with any creative, out-of-the-box solution or idea and then doing what you came up with. It is often translated as being up to something but it’s not the same.

   10.

Poglish, Ponglish, Pinglish or whatchamacallit. I’ve always said Ponglish, but a lot of people say Poglish and recently I came across Pinglish and I think Pinglish is best. Anyway, obviously you know what I’m talking about, the blend of Polish and English. It is often used by Polish diaspore in the US and the UK (like in Chicago I guess it’s quite a big thing) or by Polish young people in a slangy sort of way, or (voluntarily or not) by Polish speakers learning English/English speakers learning Polish when they’re dealing with language interference and/or nearly discharged/fried brains. It can be so freakishly amusing sometimes.

   11.

I often gravitate towards languages that are less popular and less heard off, if not obscure. Polish may not be as much as obscure, but, apart from Poland or places in other countries where there are a lot of Polish immigrants, you won’t hear it a lot, and there aren’t super many non-natives who would speak it. This small language factor is very appealing to me.

   12.

Because, whether it is the most difficult language in the world or not, it is viewed by many learners and natives as difficult, and I was lucky enough to not have to make a conscious effort of learning it. 😀 And the difficult factor is also appealing in itself. I like difficult languages, they are fascinating, kind of similarly to how complex human beings are.

What do you love your native language for, if you do, and if you don’t, why? 🙂

 

Declan Galbraith – “An Angel”.

Hiya people! 🙂

Thought I’d share another piece from Declan Galbraith’s second album – Thank You – released in 2006, when he was 14. Currently (or at least in 2018, that was the last time I heard anything substantial about him) he makes his music under the stage name of Child of Mind, and writes his own songs, however back then, he mostly did covers of classic pop or rock songs, and this one is I believe one of his more well-known covers.

Originally, An Angel was a song of The Kelly Family (an European-American band which enjoyed quite a lot of popularity in the 90’s) and was written by Paddy Kelly for his late mother, Barbara, who passed away early from cancer if I remember correctly, and I think it’s not the only song he wrote for her. I don’t know a whole lot about The Kelly Family but since Declan is one of my faza subjects, and since he has covered more than one of The Kelly Family’s song and liked their music, I used to listen to them a bit because I like to know what my fazas like to listen to. Anyway, while The Kellys have some quite cool songs, I think Declan’s covers are a lot better, and so is the case with this one.

Penny Police – “Mostly The Same”.

Hey guys! 🙂

I’ve heard about Penny Police quite some time ago, but only recently have really started listening to her more. She’s compared to people like Agnes Obel or Emiliana Torrini who are both artists that I like a lot, so I guess it was inevitable that I’d have to start listening to her at some point. 😀

Penny Police’s actual name is Marie Fjeldsted, and, just like the aforementioned Agnes Obel, she is Danish (but you, well, at least I, and I guess I’m pretty decent at accents, wouldn’t guess with 100% certainty that she’s Danish. Danes usually have such a distinctive, quite cool-sounding accent in English, but the only thing that to me clearly says she’s Scandinavian is that she doesn’t do z’s). And this is one of my favourite songs by her.

Georgia Ruth – “Week Of Pines”.

Hey people! 🙂

I’d like to share another beautiful song from Georgia Ruth with you guys today. I think it is one of my favourites from her. The lyrics are interesting, I love the harp in it obviously, and it just flows so well as a whole. It is the title track of one of her albums, and the album as a whole is all about homecoming, joyfulness and forgiveness of previously made mistakes, and it’s so full of nature.