Declan Galbraith – “David’s Song (Who’ll Come With Me?)”

Hey guys! 🙂

For today, I’m sharing with you a song from Declan Galbraith second album, Thank You, which he released at the age of 14. Just as with his first album, it contains a lot of covers of either pop classics or some popular Celtic songs, and some original stuff. This song was a hit in the late ’70’s in some European countries, all because of The Kelly Family, who performed it originally, with John Kelly singing the solo. The song became particularly popular because of being the theme song for the German TV production called “The Adventures of David Balfour”, based on the book “Kidnapped’ by Robert Louis Stevenson. The music to this tune was composed by Vladimir Cosma. On the same album by Declan, there is also another Kelly Family song – “An Angel” – which I shared with you before. I like both of them a lot more in Declan’s versions.

Bendith – “Dan Glo” (Locked).

Hey guys! 🙂

For today, I chose a beautiful song, another one from the self-titled album by Bendith – the Welsh folk music project which is a collaboration between the band Plu (Gwilym Bowen Rhys and his two older sisters – Elan and Marged) – and Carwyn Ellis from the indie pop band Colorama. In this particular piece, we can hear Carwyn and Marged’s vocals.

I like the slightly dark feel of this song. I love reading reviews of albums that I particularly love – and this one definitely belongs in this category – to see how my reception of them is similar/different to the reviewer’s and perhaps sometimes gain some more insight along the way. And I remember reading in one review, I believe it was written by Helen Gregory from Folk Radio UK but I’m not perfectly sure, that this piece feels very cinematic. I think this is the absolutely perfect word to describe it!

Declan Galbraith – “Danny Boy”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I’d like to share with you a piece from another of my faza people – Declan Galbraith, these days also known as Child of Mind. – This song, however, was sung by him long before the Child of Mind project, as it’s from his very first, self-titled album from 2002, which he recorded at the age of 10. Some songs on it are original material, but mostly they’re covers of either pop classics or, as in this case, quite well-known Celtic folk songs. Declan definitely has a special relationship with Celtic music, even if it’s less apparent in his later music. This is because he is of both Irish and Scottish descent, and his grandfather – affectionately called Poppy Ben by Declan – with whom he had a very close relationship because he was looked after by his grandparents a lot as a child; played several instruments in a Celtic music bands, and would often take Declan along on rehearsals and concerts.

“Danny Boy” was written at the beginning of 20th century by an English lawyer and lyricist, Frederic Weatherly. He was introduced to the song “Londonderry Air” by his sister, and set this new song of his to its melody. It is not known how exactly this song should be interpreted and what the author had in mind writing it, but what comes to mind for many people is that it’s from the perspective of a parent, whose son is leaving home for war or an uprising, which makes sense to me.

Bendith – “Bendith” (Blessing).

Hey guys! 🙂

The piece I have for you today comes from the musical project called Bendith, from their album called Bendith, and the piece is called Bendith as well. Bendith have featured on my blog a few times earlier, because one of my faza people – Gwilym Bowen Rhys – took part in it. It is a collaboration between members of the band Plu (Gwilym and his two sisters) and Carwyn Ellis – leader of Colorama, an indie pop Welsh band. – Plu and Colorama sound very different from each other, but the four are all a very versatile bunch and, judging from the album, must have gotten along very well musically. The idea came from Carwyn Ellis, with whom the music of Plu resonated very strongly so he reached out to them asking if they’d like to do something together. And that’s how Bendith was born, it sounds a lot like Plu, yet different. I like how it’s both so contemporary yet also rootsy, filled with nostalgia and childhood memories. “Bendith” is the closing track from this album.

 

Below is a link to Songwhip, where you can (hopefully) find this piece on your favourite streaming service. There is a link to YouTube as well but it’s not properly tagged or something, and it links to a different song.

Bendith – “Bendith”.

Llio Rhydderch – “Edward’s Grip”.

For today, I chose to share with you another piece from this amazing harpist. This is also one of the first pieces from her that I’ve ever heard. It comes from her collaborative album with Tomos Williams (on trumpet) and Mark O’Connor (on drums), but this particular tune is just a solo harp one and it’s definitely my favourite from this album and one from my most favourite pieces of music from Llio overall.

Song of the day (21st April ) – Gwenan Gibbard – “Traeth Lafan/Adlais Nia/Pen Rhaw” (Lavan Sounds/Nia’s Echo/Spade’s Head”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today, I’m sharing with you a few pieces in one track from Gwenan Gibbard. As far as I know, the first two are her own compositions, and the third one is traditional for sure. The first one, like many tunes by Gwenan Gibbard, is inspired by nature in north Wales. This one is dedicated to Traeth Lafan, or Lavan Sands in English, which is an intertidal sandbank in Gwynedd.

Catrin Finch – “Aurora”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Today I’m sharing with you a very beautiful piece from Welsh harpist Catrin Finch, whose music I’ve already shared with you a few times before, also some in collaboration with Senegalese kora player Seckou Keita. I’m sharing this particular piece with you because that’s what I woke up to today, and it was such a great feeling to listen to it somewhere between the real world and Dreamland.

Jacob Elwy a’r Trwbz – “Paid â Stopio” (Don’t Stop).

Hiya people! 🙂

Time for another song from Jacob Elwy, and Y Trwbz as well. This one comes from their 2018 EP – “Croesa’r Afon” (Cross The River). – While it is mostly Mared Williams whose very versatile vocals we can hear on this EP, in this particular song, we can enjoy listening to both her and Jacob, so it’s like a double treat for the brain – at least mine – because I am a big fan of Mared and am in awe of her talent and how she’s capable of singing absolutely anything from folk to jazz to pop to rock, and Jacob is one of my faza people, 

so… do I seriously still have to explain anything else? 😀 I love the crazy rocky energy that this piece is sparkling with (seriously, you know I’m an auditory-gustatory synaesthete, and I swear this song in its entirety is just like a fizzy drink 😀 ) and how it is just so naturally and unconstrainedly positive or actually almost euphoric. It is one of my go-to songs that I listen to to make me feel better or give me a kick of motivation and energy. Whatever fun thing you’re doing while listening to this, it can seriously make you feel like forgetting about everything else and never wanting to stop.

Llio Rhydderch – “Titrwm Tatrwm” (Pitter Patter).

Hey guys! 🙂

Today, I’m sharing with you another piece by Llio Rhydderch. There’s a traditional song in Welsh by the same name about a boy who visits a girl he loves in the night and throws small stones at her window, hence the Pitter Patter title, but that one has a different melody, so I’m not sure if this one has anything to do with it, and I might share that one with you too at some point. In any case, I really like this piece, but then again, I like absolutely everything from Llio!

Pendevig – “Lliw Gwyn” (White Colour).

Hi hi hi people, and very happy Easter to you all! 🙂

I’m late with today’s song of the day, as it’s Easter so I’ve been spending a lot of time with my family.

For today, I chose a really hilarious Welsh folk tune, performed by Pendevig. Pendevig is a project evolving around traditional music, but also heavily infused with influences from lots of other genres. It is made up of a group of young talented folk musicians who are already well-known on the Welsh-language music scene, most of them from the band Calan. However, I first became interested in it because one of my faza people – Gwilym Bowen Rhys – is also part of it. It is also he – together with Bethan Rhiannon, the vocalist of Calann – who sings the song I’m about to share with you.

Its actual, full title is “Lliw Gwyn Rhosyn Yr Haf” which has been apparently translated to English in a lot of ways, but the most literal translation that makes sense is White Colour Of A Summer Rose. It’s basically a conversation between a mann and a woman, where the man tries to chat her up by comparing her to a white summer rose, and some other things as well, and she wittily rejects his advances, only to finally admit that she’s actually just as madly in love with him as he is with her. When I first heard this song, I had no idea what it was about, but as my Welsh kept developing and I was able to understand enough of it to figure out the context, I was snorting out with laughter.

While preparing to share this song with you, I’ve found this fantastic and very thoroughly researched post about it by

Ffion Mair from The Foxglove Trio

which I would highly recommend to read if you’re interested to find out more. – According to Ffion’s post, this song was written by Richard Williams – a 19th-century blind poet born in north Wales, also known as Dic Dywyll, or Dark Dick in English. – I just love how creative it’s original title was – “A new song, which is a conversation between a young boy and a girl about getting married”. 😀

In Pendevig’s version, at the end of the song, there is also a beautiful poem written by Iestyn Tyne – one of the members of the group – which, as Pendevig explain, is about the loss of a lover and healing from it.

Here is the translation of Lliw Gwyn from Ffion’s post, including one verse which Pendevig actually don’t sing, (the third one), but which does appear also on Pendevig’s website, plus it’s funny and I like it.

 

“Good day to you my final star,

As white as a summer’s rose,

You are the fine girl that I love,

As white as a summer’s rose.”

“Well, shut your mouth you vain old man,

The nastiest ever on the face of the land!

I will hang myself before I come to court you,

In a word, that is the truth.”

“Your kiss, my darling one

As white as a summer’s rose,

Is like honeycomb every minute,

As white as a summer’s rose.”

“And so is your kiss,

The nastiest ever on the face of the land,

Second only to being wronged,

You old big-mouth, that is the truth.”

“Tell me when we can marry,
As white as a summer’s rose,
I know you belong to me,
As white as a summer’s rose.”
“When you see the cat eating the pudding,
The nastiest ever on the face of the land!
And Siôn Puw’s cow making the butter,
You old big-mouth, that is the truth.”

“If you are going to refuse me,

As white as a summer’s rose,

Give me a kiss before we say farewell,

As white as a summer’s rose.”

“Well… I might as well tell you the truth as not,

O kindest ever on the face of the land,

You had two before, you can have another fifteen,

In a word, that is the truth.”

Gwen Màiri – “Hwyr” (Late).

Hey people! 🙂

Today I felt like sharing with you something from this great Celtic harpist and also singer. She comes from a Welsh-speaking family but was raised in Scotland and I believe can also speak Scottish Gaelic. I first learned about her because of Gwilym Bowen Rhys, with whom she’s been collaborating as a harpist on all his albums as far as I’m aware. The piece I’m sharing with you comes from her album Mentro (Venture) on which, in turn, we can also hear Gwilym playing guitar, mandolin, fiddle and shruti. She’s also supported by Jordan Price Williams – who is also very active on the Welsh-language folk music scene – on cello.

This particular piece was inspired by Gwen Màiri’s memory of her grandfather and the passing of time from the perspective of old age.

Radio Luxembourg – “Lisa, Magic A Porfa” (Lisa, Magic And Grass).

Hey guys! 🙂

Today I’m sharing with you a song with which I have lots of cool associations. I first heard it somewhere at the beginning of my Welsh music journey, or at least when this journey has started in a more serious way, together with my Welsh language skills starting to develop a little bit. I guess this is the most popular song from this band. They were initially known as Radio Luxembourg, but then some time later on decided to change their name to Race Horses, to avoid legal problems with the radio station. I guess that as Race Horses they also started to record more in English, rather than in Welsh. Now, both Radio Luxembourg and Race Horses are a thing of the past, but the people who made this band continue to make great music in other projects or on their own.

I like this song because it’s so positive and energetic in its own right, and also I have a lot of my own happy memories with the time when I was listening to it a lot. It’s really cool so I hope you’ll enjoy it too.

Both the Welsh lyrics and the translation are in the description of the video, so I won’t be sharing the translation in the post as well.

Rachel Sermanni – “Eggshells”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Today, I have for you a song from this really interesting Scottish singer. I’ve known this particular song for quite some time, but I’ve been listening to more of Rachel Sermanni’s music lately and exploring it. She is from the Scottish highlands and is of Italian descent, and what I find particularly interesting about her music is that I’ve read she’s often inspired by her dreams when creating it.

Declan Galbraith – “Moody Blues”.

Hey people! 🙂

A moody blues is what my Sofi seems to be having right now, so it made me think of this song and I thought why not share it with you. Funny how the album from which it comes from (You and Me) was released in her birth year and how at the time Declan was almost her age. 😀

So You And Me was Declan’s third album, which he released at the age of 14, and it was also the last album of his that he released under his real name. While he is known for covering a lot of pop and rock classics, this seems to be his original song, although I’ve no clue if he wrote it himself or if someone wrote it for him. The title quite surely comes partly from The Moody Blues – the Birmingham 60’s rock band – which he likes and has covered their song Nights In White Satin on his second album.

Phamie Gow – “Beginning Sweetly”.

Hi guys! 🙂

Today, I’d like to introduce you to a piece of music from a very talented Scottish multiinstrumentalist whom I’ve just recently discovered myself. I really like how versatile she is musically. And, since it’s still morning here right now, I thought I’d share this particular piece, because I think it’s really nice to listen to it at this time of the day.

Trwbadwr – “Feel So Close”.

Hiya people! 🙂

Okay, so time for some Jacob music again, finally. 🙂 If you’re new or still don’t know for some other reason, I have such a great thing in my life called faza, and my current dominant faza subject is Jacob Elwy Williams.

If you’ve heard about Jacob already on here, you’ll know that he’s been the vocalist in a rock band called Y Trŵbz. But I didn’t say that, at the very beginnings, before it was called Y Trŵbz, before Mared Williams joined them as another vocalist and long before they have become more widely known in Wales thanks to Y Selar (Welsh music magazine) they were called Trwbadwr. They weren’t really officially recording back then, just gigging or jamming for fun I believe, as it often seems to be with young Welsh-language bands when they start out. However, recently I was thinking that I should still see if there perhaps is some of their music from that time somewhere online, just out of my insatiable, Aquarian curiosity, because I really wanted to know how, or if, their style has changed over the years, and… you know, when you like someone’s music, it’s great to be able to hear some of their earlier, unofficial, perhaps even more amateur music. It just gives you a broader idea about them and their music. I’ll never forget my excitement when I found out about the first recording ever of Cornelis Vreeswijk – one of my previous faza people – from 1959, so I guess about 5 years before his actual career as a musician started, if I’m counting right. And so I looked, and the song I’m about to share with you is the only thing I found from Trwbadwr, but there’s also an unfinished version of it on YouTube as well and it’s also great.

As you can maybe guess from the title alone, this is their cover of Feel So Close by Calvin Harris. I quite like this song in its original version even though it’s mainstream-y and thus rather very normal for Bibiel standards 😀 but I like theirs far more (not surprising I guess). 🙂