Rachel Newton – “One Hour More”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I’d really like to share with you this beautiful, melancholic piece from Scottish. Harpist and folk singer Rachel Newton. This is her original composition, from her 2016 album Here’s My heart, Come Take it. 

Aryeh Frankfurter – “The Butterfly”.

   Hey guys! 🙂 

   Today I want to share with you all a traditional Celtic folk tune, played by the multi-instrumentalist Aryeh Frankfurter. I’ve already shared a fair bit of his music before, including together with harpist Lisa Lynne. 

Llio Rhydderch – “Melangell”.

   Hiya people! 🙂 

   Today I’d like to share with you this beautiful and delightfully long piece played by Llio Rhydderch, the Welsh triple harp player whose music I really love and have shared on here many times. This is the title track from her album Melangell. Melangell is a Welsh feminine name said to originate from the Welsh words mêl meaning honey, and angell meaning angel. It’s the name of a Welsh early saint who is considered a patron saint of little creatures and whose feast day is on 27 May, her name can be also latinised as Monacella. I’ve actually once shared a song about her sung by Plu

Gwen Màiri – “Y Dydd Drwy’r Ffenest” (The Day Through the Window”.

   Hiya people! 🙂 

   Today I want to share with you a beautiful piece from Gwen Màiri’s album Mentro (Venture), an amazing album from which I’ve already shared several tracks in the past. In case you don’t know, Gwen Màiri Yorke is a harpist and folk singer of both Scottish and Welsh heritage, who is both a Scottish Gaelic as well as Welsh native speaker. On this album, she is accompanied by Jordan Price Williams on cello, as well as Gwilym Bowen Rhys on several instruments, but in this particular piece we can hear him playing the mandolin. As far as I’m aware, this tune is Gwen’s original composition. 

Sally Fletcher – “Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral”.

   Hi people! 🙂 

   Today I’d like to introduce you to another interesting harpist, who as far as I’m aware belongs more to what I call «relaxing harpist» camp, rather than folk or classical or something like that. Sally is also an organist, pianist and teacher. Still, the tune played by her that I want to share with you today is definitely a contemporary folk one. It is an Irish-American song that was written by James Roys Shannon and first performed by Chauncey Olcott, and later popularised again by Bing Crosby. 

Aine Minogue – “Dark Island”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I’d like to share with you this pensive and relaxing piece by one of my favourite harpists – Aine Minogue – which she recorded together with other instrumentalists that she collaborates with. For those who are new to Aine’s music, she is an Irish Celtic harpist as well as singer and composer who was born in county Tipperary but currently resides in Boston. 

Diana Rowan – “The Celtic Sonata: “The Star of Munster/Cremonea/Glenlivet”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I thought I’d share with you this lovely harp piece called The Celtic Sonata, as it consists of three movements, each of them being a traditional Celtic tune. The first one is a reel called The Star of Munster. The second – Cremonea, also known as Cremonia, which is the anglicised spelling of its Irish title Croí Muimhneach (Munster Heart) – is a tune composed by the blind Irish harper Turlough O’Carolan. The third one is called Glenlivet, and I’ve already shared a different version of it in the past, played by Kim Robertson

   Diana Rowan is a Celtic harpist and pianist from Dublin, but currently lives in the US, although she also travels a lot as she does a lot of concerts and gives lectures. 

Paul Dooley – “Port an Deorai/An Phis Fluich”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I thought I’d share with you a medley of two traditional Irish tunes, both of which are slip jigs, played by Paul Dooley. Paul Dooley is a harpist and harp builder from county Clare, and he plays the harp like it used to be played historically, with the nice-sounding metal strings that make it sound less ethereal than what we are used to with the more modern Celtic harps and what most people associate with a harp, and they are plucked with long fingernails rather than fingers. 

   The first of those two slip jigs is called Port an Deorai, which seems to be more popularly known as The Exile’s, although like a lot of Celtic folk tunes it has been played and recorded under lots and lots of different names. Deora does mean exile (as in an exiled person) in Irish, and port means tune or jig so I guess it does literally mean something like The Exile’s Tune. But the second tune has even more titles under which it’s known, and its main title is quite odd. When I googled it, it says everywhere that while in English it is usually known as The Wife of Choice or O’Farrel’s Welcome to Limerick, the Irish name is said to be rather naughty and mean the Wet C**t. Indeed, the word fliuch (of which fluich is perhaps some regional variation or something) does mean wet according to my dictionary. But then it says that phis means pea, not c**t, and c**t is pit in Irish. Perhaps there are several words for that though, and maybe phis is a more colloquial, sort of idiomatic one? Whether it’s wet c**t or wet pea, it makes for a peculiar and eye-catching song title. 

Nadia Birkenstock ft. Steve Hubback – “Brian Boru’s March”.

   Hi people! 🙂 

   Today, I’d like to share with you a traditional tune played by the German harpist Nadia Birkenstock whose music I’ve already shared several times on here. This time, she is accompanied by Welsh drummer and percussionist Steve Hubback. In the past I’ve also shared a version of this song performed by Alan Stivel and in that post you can learn more about its origins and who Brian Boru was, more recently I also shared a version by Clannad

Tant – “Byth Eto” (Never Again).

   Hey people! 🙂 

   The song I have for you today comes from a very interesting Welsh all-girls folk group. They mix traditional Welsh folk influences and quite minimalistic, acoustic sound with more modern, pop sensibilities. The results of such mixes in folk music can be of all kinds, but theirs are very good and a little quirky in my opinion. The members of this band live in different bits of North Wales, and they are Angharad, Elliw, Modlen, Non and Siwan, and apart from singing, Angharad and Non are also harpists, Elliw and Modlen are guitarists, and Siwan plays cajun. Some of the songs are written by one of the girls, others are covers, but another person who has written several of their songs is Siwan’s dad – Rhun ap Iorwerth – who is also Deputy Leader of Plaid Cymru – Welsh left-wing nationalist party. – And from what I understand from this song, it does have to do with the independence and freedom of Wales. 

 

Xavier de Maistre – “Mazurka Glissando”.

   Hey all you lovely people! 🙂 

   Today I have a nice harp piece for you all. I’ve shared music by a lot of different harpists and harpers with you on here, but I’ve never shared anything by Xavier de Maistre before. He is a renowned classical harpist as well as harp teacher. It comes from his EP Serenata Latina, and the author of this piece is Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona, who originally composed it for the piano. There’s also a bit of a Polish connection to this piece, since as you may or may not know, mazurka is a folk dance originating from Masuria here in Poland. 

Georgia Ruth – “Terracotta”.

   Hiya people! 🙂 

   For today, I thought I’d share with you something else from Georgia Ruth’s 2020 album Mai, which I really like and from which I’ve shared a few songs already. I like how sweet and calmly joyful this one feels. 

Gwenan Gibbard – “Gwcw Fach” (Little Cuckoo).

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I have for you a little traditional Welsh tune, performed by the singer and harpist Gwenan Gibbard, whose music I’ve shared a lot on here. I found a translation of it, written by Dafydd Iwan. 

   Little cuckoo, aren’t you foolish,
Singing amongst the spiky gorse,
Go to the parish of fair Dolgellau,
You will find there green bushes.
Little cuckoo, fly immediately
To the banks of the Wnion river
On the wing, wait awhile
By the home of my beloved.
Little cuckoo, if you see there
Someone weeping salty tears
Sing to him the song of spring
A song of hope to comfort him.

Erutan – “No One But You”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I have a really nice Celtic-styled piece for you, which has kind of ann idyllic vibe to me, from a very talented American singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Erutan. Erutan is Kate Covington, who is a classically trained violinist, but can also play various other very interesting instruments, including Celtic harp which we can hear a lot of in this piece, or even the Finnish kantele or hammered dulcimer. She makes her music drawing on a lot of different genres and styles, from classical to Celtic to music from video games like Final Fantasy. As you may have figured out, Erutan is the word nature spelt backwards, and that’s because Kate has been very close to nature ever since she was a child. 

Rachel Newton – “Poor Lost Babe”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I want to share with you a song performed by the Scottish harpist and singer Rachel Newton, several of whose songs I’ve already shared on here. It comes from her 2016 album called Here’s My Heart, Come Take it, and is written from the perspective of a mother. 

Órla Fallon – “Báidín Fheilimí” (Felimi’s Little Boat).

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I have a little  nursery rhyme for you from the Irish singer and harpist Órla Fallon whom I really like. Órla is a soloist who is also known for previously being part of the very popular Irish group Celtic WOman. This little Irish Gaelic song is apparently frequently taught to children and it originates in Donegal. The translation below comes from Wikipedia

   Felimi’s little boat went to Gola,
Felimi’s little boat and Felimi in it.
Felimi’s little boat went to Gola,
Felimi’s little boat and Felimi in it.
A tiny boat, a lively boat,
A charming boat, Felimi’s little boat.
A straight boat, a willing boat,
Felimi’s little boat and Felimi in it.

Felimi’s little boat went to Tory,
Felimi’s little boat and Felimi in it.
Felimi’s little boat went to Tory
Felimi’s little boat and Felimi in it.

Felimi’s little boat broke on Tory,
Felimi’s little boat and Felimi in it.
Felimi’s little boat broke on Tory,
Felimi’s little boat and Felimi in it.

Felimi’s little boat broke on Tory,
Fish on board and Felimi in it.
Felimi’s little boat broke on Tory,
Fish on board and Felimi in it.

Inge Frimout-Hei – “Jupiter”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today I have for you a piece played by Dutch harpist Inge Frimout-Hei which I really like. It always makes me think of Misha – as does anything that has to do with Jupiter really – because Misha’s dad was called Jupiter and that’s why, among all kinds of different names that Sofi and I have for him, we also sometimes call him alien, not just because he’s so weird and unearthly beautiful, but also because he’s literally of Jupiter. 😀 This piece comes from Inge’s album called Planetary Impressions which was released last year. 

Nansi Richards – “Faire Dance – Irish Reel”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Staying in the world of Welsh harp music, I’d like to share with you a piece played by the Welsh Celtic and triple harpist Nansi Richards, also known as Telynores Maldwyn. As its title says, this is a traditional Irish reel.