Cornelis Vreeswijk – “Cecilia Lind”.

Hey people! 🙂

If you have been reading my blog for a while, you might remember that I have been sharing some music about this Cecilia Lind girl, also by Cornelis Vreeswijk. And I have, only that time it was in Swedish, and this time, it will be in Dutch. If I know a few versions of a song in different languages, especially if it’s by the same artist or I like both of them almost equally, or even if there are two different interpretations of the same song in one language that I like equally, I like to share them both together. But I guess I must have forgotten to include the other version of this song in the post I made years ago.

Swedish “Balladen Om Herr Fredrik Åkare Och Den Söta Fröken Cecilia Lind” (The Ballad About Fredrik Åkare and The Sweet Miss Cecilia Lind) is a classic, has been covered by many artists, and it seems like pretty much every Swede knows it. In The Netherlands – not quite so. – But generally, despite Cornelis Vreeswijk was Dutch, he seems quite a lot less popular in his home country than in Sweden where he created most of his songs and poems and lived a large part of his life.

I don’t know how different the Dutch version is from the Swedish, I only have a very foggy idea of the Dutch language so far and most of what I understand of it is via my vocab from other Germanic languages, as it has a lot of common ground in terms of vocabulary both with English and with Swedish. I am sure the overall context is the same, and that some minor details have been changed, but overall I don’t really know how much they differ from each other. Given that Cornelis had written both version, and he appears to often be rather lax with translations because they were supposed to be more poetic and musical rather than literal, there could be a lot of small and maybe some not so small differences.

You can see my post about the Swedish version with the English translation of the Swedish lyrics

here.

I don’t have a translation of the Dutch version though, but at least from the post above you can get the idea of what the song is about, if you haven’t read it before. .

I will share the link to this song on Spotify, because I’m not sure it is on YouTube at all, and below the Spotify link there will be a link to Songwhip where you can find this song on some other streaming services in case you don’t use Spotify, there is also a link to YouTube but the version in the YouTube link is actually in Swedish, so I guess there must be some mishap with tags or whatever.

Cornelis Vreeswijk – Cecilia Lind

Rachel Newton – “Skye Air”.

For today, I decided to share with you a deliciously long, beautiful and a bit melancholic solo harp piece performed by Scottish harpist Rachel Newton, whose music I’ve already shared with you before. I only recently heard this particular piece but I’m totally in love with it and I think many other people may find it very interesting and pleasant. 🙂

 

Song of the day (26th November) – Enya – “Caribbean Blue”.

Hey people! 🙂

I think this is my favourite out of Enya’s more popular songs. I have so many positive feelings and associations related to it. This song was meant to be very daydream-y, and it feels right away, which is why I’ve always used it for some bigger daydreaming, relaxing visualisations and stuff. It has really helped me through so many situations and it is so relaxing and nourishing for the imagination.

As always in Enya’s case, when this song was created, the music came first, and then, when Enya’s lyricist – Roma Ryan – heard it, it made her think of the Caribbean, hence the title. It’s not as popular as Orinoco Flow, Only Time or May It Be, but people who aren’t Enya geeks yet at the same time know some more of her music than just these three songs, will typically remember hearing Caribbean Blue somewhere and able to tell that it’s Enya, or will even be well acquainted with it if they either have a bit of liking for Enya or generally 80’s music that is not necessarily disco. In Europe, it can also be heard in radio stations which play some light pop or a bit older stuff, here in Poland for example an oldies station called Radio Plus plays it regularly. So maybe you have also heard Caribbean Blue before, even if you are not a crazy Enya fan? In any case, if you are an escapist, I reckon you’ll like it even if you haven’t heard it before.

Lynn Saoirse – “Separation Of Soul And Body”.

Hey people! 🙂

I shared one track from this great Irish harpist with you before, but I thought I’d love to share another one, when I was listening to her music last night. This is absolutely one of my most favourite pieces by her, and I think it’s very deep and moving. The harmony of this piece strongly reminds me of another, New England-based, Irish harpist – Aine Minogue – whom I love and whose music had helped me through a very difficult time.

 

Kim Robertson – “Glenlivet”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I have another Celtic harp piece for you! It is performed by great Celtic harpist from Wisconsin – Kim Robertson – who was actually classically trained in orchestral harp but decided to focus on Celtic harp and has really released a lot of albums. Glenlivet is a place in Scotland, which may be known to some because of the whisky distillery that is there and produced The Glenlivet whisky. Here’s the beautiful piece.

Laura Cannell ft. Kate Ellis – “Alone In The Wolf Thickets”.

Hey people! 🙂

I have an interesting, piece for you today! It’s from English composer, recorder player and violinist Laura Cannell, whose music I’ve previously shared with you. Her music is a fusion of folk with experimental music, I’d say with inspirations both very modern, new and progressive as well as ancient. The piece I want to share with you today comes from her brand new album, which is the first volume of her collaborative series created with a bunch of other artists and Called These Feral Lands. Laura Cannell seems to be often inspired by nature in her music, and this album is no exception, as it focuses on ancient folklore, as well as feral animals. I recently had a listen to it as I stumbled upon it a bit accidentally and since I had a bit to do with her music earlier I thought I’d like to see what this new thing was. As you may or may not know, I like a bit of experimental music, and I obviously love folk. And I enjoyed listening to it I guess even more than I originally thought I would, so I thought I’d share one piece from this album with you, and I chose Alone In The Wolf Thickets. It has been made in collaboration with Dublin-based cellist, Kate Ellis.

 

Bendith – “Dinas” (City).

Hi guys! 🙂

Today I’d like to show you another piece from the beautiful project which was a result of collaboration of two, seemingly very distinct, Welsh band – alt-folk/psychedelic folk Plu (which consists of my most recent faza object Gwilym Bowen Rhys and his two sisters, Marged and Elan), and Carwyn Ellis from indie Colorama. – I wrote about that earlier because I shared with you two pieces from their collective album already. The project is called Bendith (which means blessing in Welsh) and this is also the title of the album. The album is very strongly inspired by Carwyn Ellis’ (who initiated the whole idea) fond childhood memories.

I love how this particular piece is so very atmospheric and evocative, and so rich and simply incredibly beautiful. It’s definitely one of my favourites from this album and I think there’s something totally captivating about it.

Celia Briar – “Eleanor Plunkett”.

Hey people! 🙂

Not long ago, I shared with you a harp piece performed by Sue Richards and composed by Irish national bard and composer who was also a harper – Turlough O’Carolan. – Today, I’m sharing another tune that was composed by him and that is one of his most popular compositions, very frequently played by harpers and harpists. The version I chose to share with you is by Celia Briar, whose music I’ve also shared with you quite a few times before. From what I’ve read, it used to be a song with Irish Gaelic lyrics, which are now unknown. O’Carolan wrote this song in praise of Eleanor Plunkett from Robertstown in co. Meath.

Jack Hughes ft. Maya Scott – “Selfless”.

Hey people! 🙂

Continuing yesterday’s thread of my would-be fazas named Jack from this year, today I’m introducing to you Jack Hughes. I know sweet nothing about the guy, because he doesn’t appear overly well-known and there are too many Jacks Hughes to sift through and find anything about one particular not well-known one. He has only three songs on Spotify which I all like. He has a nice voice timbre and his songs are good, but I had three problems with him when I came across him and evaluated him to be my potential new faza object. Too normal (of course). I know nothing about him, and just like I said earlier, it’s hard to develop a faza when you know nothing about your faza object, right? And last, but not least, while I do like his voice, he has such weird mannerisms when singing, uh… Since he’s not the only one and I’ve heard people singing like this a lot – I’m sure you’ll realise that  you have to, if you’ll pick up on this here – I call that poop sing, because when I was little such a way of singing sounded to me like the person doing it was trying to sing while sitting on the toilet and pooping. Because Jack’s generally so cool, it’s not much of a problem when listening him for a while, but I tend to listen to my faza objects’ music A LOT especially when having a faza peak, and I’m sure it would get old and annoying very quickly, or else it would make me laugh. Or maybe I’m exaggerating? Lemme know what you think, maybe I am judging Jack too harshly…

In any case, this is a nice song, and Maya Scott with whom he’s singing it sounds really good too. 🙂

Jack Curley – “Alice”.

Hey people! 🙂

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while with some involvement (thanks for that btw) and now saw the name Jack in the title, you may be wondering whether the Jack I’m talking about here is my next faza. I can already tell you that the answer is: no. Moreover, sadly, I still haven’t come across my next faza object (or maybe I have but it just haven’t kicked in?… I somehow doubt it but who am I to know, it’s my brain who’s in charge of it, not me, which kind of sucks but at the same time is kind of a blessing, if that makes any sense, but if it doesn’t, I guess it doesn’t really have to, from my point of view, so you don’t need to worry if you don’t really get where I’m coming from, fazas are generally rather illogical and not many people seem to have them). I had been looking, as you might recall, rather frantically and unsuccessfully, for a good few months for a faza object, even though I know it never works like this that I choose who I want to have a faza on, it’s totally random and sometimes even a bit ironical/paradoxical/illogical like with Vreeswijk, and happens on its own, at the right time. But this time round the time is more than right and there has been a huge delay because my faza on Gwil has faded a fair bit (which does not mean I no longer have a faza on Gwil, it’s always a case, or at least has always been, with my major fazas that I have a faza for 2-4 years and then it’s dominant, and after that, after I develop a new faza, the previous one just goes into the background but is still incredibly important for me, just not on the centre stage sort of and I don’t get such strong faza peaks in relation to that particular person) and I’m left with nothing really. Considering that my fazas, as a huge source of fascination and inspiration are also a large part of what my drive in life consists of, my life has felt much more pointless since then and I’ve had an episode of feeling really quite anhedonic and blah about everything. Now I’m no longer as extremely anhedonic and have sort of accepted the situation, also the good thing is that still, with enough focus and effort, I can make myself feel like I had a little faza peak on either Gwilym or Cornelis, which is always something. There’s also that literary faza I’m having – Ravi Reinsen from Daughters of Life by May Grethe Lerum – but literary fazas are always so much less strong, because with a living person there’s a lot of ways in which you can cultivate and grow your faza, while with a literary character, even the most multidimensional one, you just have the book, or a series as in this case, and how many times can you read a single series? Moreover, how substantial will that single source be for the continuous development and exploration of your faza? So while Ravi has a very important place in my Brainworld, not much can be done with it and it sucks. If the series were more popular, perhaps that would be easier, but as unheard of as it is, there’s no way for me to feed the faza so I’m actually surprised that it still lives on after such a long time (about half a year if not more) anyway. But generally, I think I gave up on my frantic search. I know anyway that it’s probably not going to do anything,it has to come on its own. Whether it will is another thing. Perhaps I’ll just no longer have fazas. That would be really super shitty but I’m sure one can get used to it and live on, though the quality of one’s inner life is rather questionable then but there’s not much I can do.

Anyway, as you also might recall, I am a huge Jackophile and because none of my previous faza objects was called Jack or anything similar, I thought it would be so cool having a faza on a Jack, so I was particularly looking for people named Jack, or anything related whose music I could like, also for Hamishes because I’ve recently fallen in love with the name Hamish (my Mum made me realise that it almost sounds like “Hey, Mish! 😀 😀 😀 “, but with Hamishes it was a total failure. I mostly used Spotify for that.

And if not that I am fairly sure that Spotify doesn’t have any such algorithm, cuz in what way would it even work, I’d probably think that it must have picked up somewhat on my looking for Jacks, because while in the past it would be a really rare thing that Spotify would recommend me any Jacks, now I get at least one, or one band featuring a Jack, per month (or thereabouts, I guess) in my Discover Weekly playlist. Never mind that I’ve known and listened to many of them previously, but to some I haven’t or hadn’t had a clue about their existence.

And today, I want to share with you a song by one of these new to me Jacks – Jack Curley! – In fact, he’s super new to me because Spotify only recommended him to me this week. I haven’t even had time yet to sit down and listen more carefully to his other music except this one song.

He’s most likely not a material for my next faza because while I liked this song of his and I think he’s very good vocally and all he’s just a little bit too normal. Yeah, that’s almost always, with a few exceptions, a problem with my Jack candidates for a faza. Actually Jack is such a normal and simple name so perhaps it’s always the case with Jacks, that they’re cool, likeable, but, uh, too normal! Like I said though, I haven’t had a listen to more of his music. Maybe if I will, something will click. Also, one of my major fazas that I’ve had so far – Declan – is also quite normal, I’d say about the same degree as this Jack, and still I developed a faza on him. My criteria are quite narrow anyway so perhaps that’s one reason I can’t find a faza. Maybe people who say I’m snobbish when it comes to music are actually right? Maybe I shouldn’t hold my brain back and get rid of any criteria? But I have to say I’d be kind of afraid then what my brain would pick, seriously you never know with brains. 😀

As far as I understand, he’s relatively new to the music world at least when it comes to releasing his own music. He’s also a Mancunian (I did think at one point it would be so cool if my potential new faza object, apart from being a Jack, was from the north of England, because that’s where Jack Rutter was from and that was what prompted me to think I’d like that at this point, oh and Jack Rutter was one of the few less normal Jacks that I’ve found who appealed to me). So here is Jack Curley’s debut single – Alice. – It’s very normal for my standards but it’s great nevertheless.

Jess Ward – “Cowrie Love”.

Hi guys! 🙂

Today I’d like to introduce to you a singer and harpist who is very new to me. I only heard her for the first time on Blas Folk Radio Cymru a couple days ago and I really liked her. For now, I don’t know any more of her music, but I am definitely going to check it out. I think both her vocals and harp play are really nice. I didn’t know what cowrie meant when first hearing this song, so just in case you don’t either, that’s how sea snails are called.

Hywel Pitts – “Ailadrodd” (Repeat).

For today, I chose to share with you a Hywel Pitts’ song. I only know two solo songs of his, it’s possible that he has more of them and I just don’t know (that’s what the lyrics of this song may also kind of suggest, haha). Currently he is the vocalist of a Welsh-language rock band I Fight Lions. Both these songs by Hywel Pitts that I know have always sounded to me like they have very interesting lyrics but since I’m still like lower intermediate or so, and couldn’t find the lyrics anywhere online to help me understand them, there was always a lot of guessing and assuming involved. However now I understand at least as much of this song to be able to grasp the context, although I fear I have no clue about what this repeating bit in the chorus means, and I feel like it’s important. Oh well…

Anyway, the song is about how the lyrical subject (can we talk about lyrical subject in pop/folk lyrics? 😀 I don’t know, but I also don’t know if it’s Hywel Pitts’ own experience or just something he felt like writing so let’s say it is a lyrical subject) dreamt in his teens about being a rock star. Years later, he finds himself doing just small gigs. He is wondering whether perhaps he’s not charismatic enough, not talented enough, not confident enough. But how can he be confident if he has no fans? Maybe it’s because he isn’t good at laughing at himself, or because he doesn’t have family in the BBC, maybe he’s not fashionable enough, or doesn’t write enough hits, or his songs are bad, in any case no one buys his CD’s or even downloads his mp3s. He has tried a lot of things (everything basically) to achieve his dream – he has tried dressing like a guy, like a girl, he’s been working very hard for free, trying to be folksy, punkrocky, fat, thin, courageous, interesting, funny, honest, different, entertaining, straight, gay, bi, support Tories, Plaid Cymru (Party of Wales – this is a socialist-nationalist Welsh party), Labour, he tried praying, joined Zoosk, Tinder, OK Cupid, he’s been writing in Welsh, English and French, etc. etc. etc. I don’t understand all of that unfortunately, but the point is that still, despite his efforts, no one’s paying any attention. Eventually he concludes that – I am not sure if I understand what he does not need, but I’m pretty sure that what he does need is “four chords and a smile”.

If this is indeed Hywel Pitts’ experience, that makes me very sad because, while I know only two songs by him, except for I Fight Lions, I like them both and I think I could consider myself his fan, even if I’m the only one. I like things that others don’t, especially if they have anything to do with minority languages and Celticness and are quirky. So perhaps that would increase his self-confidence, if he knew that, lol, and maybe that would help him to gain more fans, in turn. I am hoping for the best here.

Song of the day (16th November) – Child Of Mind – “Maybe We Can Find A Way”.

Hi people! 🙂

I’d like to share with you a song by one of my main fazas, more exactly the object of my second faza – Declan Galbraith, aka Child Of Mind. I’ve shared some of his music, earlier and more current, before, so you may know that he has started his singing career at the age of 11, and is from England but has a lot of Celtic heritage on both sides of his family. Currently he has this Child Of Mind project going on, and although in the earlier years of his career he mostly covered some popular songs, now he writes his own lyrics and they are very interesting and often quite deep or at least can make you think. The song I want to share with you now is one of these and is called Maybe We Can Find A Way. I chose to show you a live version, for no other reason that I saw it first when looking for you on youTube, and lives are typically more genuine so if they’re good audio quality and well performed I’m all for lives instead of album versions unless I have some strong preference for the album version for some reason. As you’ll be able to hear, this is from his gig in Italy.

Song of the day (15th November) – The Harriet Earis Trio (Kitchen Devils).

Just a couple days ago, I shared with you guys a very interesting piece by this group called Cadair Idris. Later I thought that actually, this whole project is so quirky (and obviously I’m all for quirky on here) and there’s so much to like about their music that I’d like to share something else from them, especially that I’ve been sharing a lot of harp music lately and catching up on that I hadn’t done that a lot in the previous years of this bllog. So the piece I chose now is called Kitchen Devils. It is much more experimental than jazzy, and I really do like experimental music. It’s so fun and quirky and there’s no boundaries. Here, you really see it. Well, I do. I’ve never heard something similar I guess. It’s such a genuine blend of folk and electronica, it tastes really good to my synaesthetic, auditory-gustatory brain. More exactly it tastes a bit minty and lemony (or maybe limey?) at the same time. The dance beat made me think how cool it would be if harp was used in some kinds of club music. Instead of vocals or keyboards? It wouldn’t need to be folksy at all. I’ll have to look around if someone has ever come up with such an idea and did it. 😀 Or maybe the final result wouldn’t be cool at all and very different to what I imagine, and instead it would turn out to be a total harp profanity. For now, let’s enjoy this quirky piece. 🙂

Song of the day (14th November) – Celia Briar – “Farewell To Craigie Dhu”.

Here’s another lovely harp-driven tune for you guys, from a harpist whose music I shared with you before. This composition sounds contemporary to me, and turns out that that’s what it is. It was composed by Scottish folk singer songwriter Dougie MacLean, and the Craigie Dhu in the title was a place (property) where he lived. I think moving houses, especially such that are dear enough to you that you feel like capturing them in music, is a very stressful and unsettling thing but this farewell doesn’t sound all that sad at all, it sounds very hopeful, don’t you think? So if you need a bit of hope for the future in your life, maybe you can find it in here.

Song of the day (13th November) – Georgia Ruth – “Brychni” (Freckles).

A couple days ago, I had an absolutely lovely dream. I don’t remember much of it now as it has faded but I remembered a fair bit after I woke up and it was so happy. As you may know, I always sleep with the music from Spotify or some radio station playing quietly in the background as that helps me with the sensory anxiety and is generally fun. I also like having a soundscape to my dreams, haha. And when I woke up from that happy dream, this song by Georgia Ruth was playing. And since then, it’s been stuck in my brain and brainworming me. Which I have no problem with.

I shared some music from Georgia Ruth earlier as I really like her music, but in case you don’t know, she is a Welsh singer, harpist, and even has her own evening show on BBC Radio Cymru. So here’s this beautiful piece.

Song of the day (12th November) – Cornelis Vreeswijk ft. Made In Sweden – “Ett Gammalt Bergtroll” (An Old Mountain Troll) & Sofia Karlsson – “Ett Gammalt Bergtroll”.

Hi people! 🙂

So I’m quite behind with this series, which is quite a pity, because on 12 November was one of my main fazas – Cornelis Vreeswijk’s – death anniversary. It’s been 37 years since he passed away!… As I always say, way too many! And I originally wanted to commemorate him exactly on that day but oh well… at least I can do it now.

I’ve been feeling kinda crappy lately so I chose a poem which, deep down, between the lines – but it’s quite easily readable – is also about feeling shitty with and about yourself, which generally is very different from how I am experiencing it yet at the same time very similar because essentially it’s all about having an overactive and spiteful self-critic and hating yourself as a result, just the ways this hatred manifests are different between different people I think.

The author of the poem, however, is not Cornelis, although as you may remember from my blog he himself was also a poet in addition to being a singer. This poem was written by an early 20th century Swedish poet Gustav Fröding, who is really loved in Sweden, although, just like Vreeswijk he was also quite controversial in his time and if I remember correctly even had an episode where he faced a trial for obscenity because of one poem he wrote. Also, again just like Vreeswijk, he had a life-long problem with alcohol as well as intimate relationships with women. Interestingly, in my Dad’s dictionary, a troll means someone who drinks heavily and chronically. Fröding spent a large part of his life in all sorts of mental health institutions though it’s not clear what diagnosis he had exactly, it sounds like some sort of psychotic disorder and depression, the latter ran in his family. More exactly it was his mother who suffered from it when he was a child, and as a result wasn’t able to parent him properly and so he had a rather difficult childhood. Years ago when I was learning a lot about Fröding and reading his poems simply because I knew Vreeswijk appreciated him and they appeared to have so freaking much in common (and if you’ve got any idea about fazas you know that for someone who has a faza anything even remotely related to their faza object is interesting and worth digging into), I’ve come across an opinion that this early separation from his mother was the main factor contributing to his later problems with relationships and pretty much all the other emotional and mental health related difficulties that he was experiencing, including the self-hatred thing that we’re focusing on since that’s what the poem focuses on.

Cornelis Vreeswijk, as you may know since I’ve written about that a few times earlier when writing about him in more detail, also struggled with similar emotional issues (though he did not have any official mental health diagnosis as far as I am aware, though he did suffer from extreme paranoia and stuff). He had terrible problems with intimacy and closeness and often wrote about craving it, and had relationships with many women in his life, but when things started to get more deep, it scared him, or something else made the relationship impossible to be stable for longer and things were constantly stormy and messy from what you can observe when having a closer look at his life. He was always very shy though it may be hard to believe just when hearing him live a few times, I had a problem with that anyway because he is so eloquent and has a sort of jovial, kinda boisterous air about him. But when you observe things for longer, listen to many more live recordings, read some more and listen to some interviews like I did, it does show a lot, plus obviously it is there in his poems and lyrics. It often amazes me how he could mask it so well but from what I understand he saw his outside personality as some sort of a role he was supposed to play in life, or something. Must have been so freakishly exhausting, would surely be for me anyway haha. And of course there’s that whole self-loathing and self-destruction thing which is just so sad. I remember when watching the 2010 Amir Hamdin’s film “Cornelis” (which was a real struggle since I didn’t really have any audiodescription or anything and with my less than perfect Swedish skills didn’t always understand everything fully but still I think I understood a lot on that first watching, I did have English subtitles to help myself with though when need be but back then my Swedish was actually better than my English) that was what affected me the most when I saw the level of his self-destructivity, perhaps because, while I am not an addict in the classical understanding of this word, I struggle with other self-destructive behaviours like self-harm and can deeply relate to what it’s like feeling awful about yourself, so I guess it must have struck a chord or something.    So it seems quite natural that Cornelis would feel some affinity with Fröding as they shared so much, and I am actually a bit surprised that he didn’t interpret more of his poems because apparently a lot of Swedish singers did that.

He released his interpretation of it, with a very jazzy/bluesy feel on his 1970 album “Poem, Ballader Och Lite Blues” (Poems, Ballads And A Bit Of Blues). It’s not as very prone to setting to music as many other Frödings poems are, so probably for that reason, rather than an actual song, it’s more like sing-speak, which is something Vreeswijk used a lot in his music and I think it often makes it more expressive than just singing and is very characteristic of his style.

But a couple years ago, quite some time later after I acquainted myself with Cornelis’ discography, I came across his live performance of this song on YouTube, in collaboration with a 70’s jazzrock band Made In Sweden. I like the album version a lot and it’s not much different at all, despite the instrumentalists are different, but I slightly prefer the rocky live version rather than the jazzy album version as it just speaks to me more, so that is why I chose to share the live one with you.

For contrast, there is another artist from Sweden called Sofia Karlsson whom I absolutely love (I shared her cover of Vreeswijk’s Grimasch Om Morgonen in the very beginnings of this blog), who also interpreted this poem in 2009, but in such a starkly different way! While Cornelis’ version is so raw and jaggy, intense and frenzied, raving and just so very directly conveying the feeling of this poem, Sofia’s version, while no less expressive, is so much subtler, sophisticated and I’d say more from an observer’s point of view, if you get what I mean. For some people it might make it more bearable. 😀 I love both!

In Cornelis’ live version, he makes a brief introduction just like on the album and says that: “Gustav Fröding was a hip poet. He tried to drown his sorrows. But they could swim”. I think it’s such an interesting and Vreeswijkish way to put it lol. Below is a (free, not literal) translation of this poem, so that you know what it’s all about. I took it from

here.

It’s a pity though that most of you probably can’t understand the Swedish version and there are so many cool words that I’ve never heard anywhere else, my favourite is klumpkloss, which in the translation below is interpreted as “object of fright”, I’m not exactly sure how to translate it to English but I suppose it would be something like a lump. I find this word really funny but sadly never had an occasion to use it in a real conversation, I don’t even know if people actually use it. 😀

 

The evening draws on apace now

The night will be dark and drear;

I ought to go up to my place now,

But ’tis pleasanter far down here.

Mid the peaks where the storm is yelling

‘Tis lonely and empty and cold;

But ’tis merry where people are dwelling,

In the beautiful dale’s green fold.

And I think that when I was last here

A princess wondrously fair,

Soft gold on her head, went past here;

She’d make a sweet morsel, I swear!

The rest fled, for none dared linger,

But they turned when far off to cry,

While each of them pointed a finger:

“What a great, nasty troll! oh, fie!”

But the princess, friendly and mild-eyed,

Gazed up at me, object of fright,

Though I must have looked evil and wild-eyed,

And all fair things from us take flight.

Next time I will kiss her and hold her,

Though ugly of mouth am I,

And cradle and lull on my shoulder,

Saying: “Bye, little sweet-snout, bye!”

And into a sack I’ll get her,

And take her home with me straight,

And then at Yule I will eat her

Served up on a fine gold plate.

But hum, a-hum! I am mighty dumb,–

Who’d look at me then so kindly?

I’m a silly dullard–a-hum, a-hum!

To think the thing out so blindly.

Let the Christian child go in peace, then;

As for us, we’re but trolls, are we.

She’d make such a savory mess, then,

It is hard to let her be.

But such things too easily move us,

When we’re lonely and wicked and dumb,

Some teaching would surely improve us.

Well, I’ll go home to sleep-a-hum!!

Chłopcy Kontra Basia – “Oj Tak” (Oh Yeah).

So today we – Polish people – are celebrating the 102nd anniversary of regaining our country’s independence, yay!🇵🇱🇵🇱🇵🇱🎉 And we need to celebrate it on My Inner Mishmash as well, with some Polish music. Especially that there is generally very little Polish music on here. Not because I don’t like Polish music, but just because I know rather little of it that I would truly love. I’m sure though that there is still a lot that I haven’t discovered and many musicians that just aren’t promoted enough so people don’t get to learn about them.

Previously as some of you may remember, on our major national holidays I had a habit of sharing some music by non-native Polish speakers singing in Polish, often something about Poland. I don’t think I have any more of such quirky findings for today but I’ll definitely keep looking as it’s always interesting both from a Pole’s and linguophile’s perspective. 😀

Today, it’s a native Polish band. Funnily enough, while I’m not a huge fan of jazz, as it happens, both the group performing the song for yesterday and for today make some sort of folk and jazz fusion. 😀 But it wasn’t planned. I mean yes, I did plan ahead to share them as I always do and in this particular order but I didn’t really realise when doing so that they have this in common, haha!

I discovered this band years ago, when sitting in the car and waiting for my Mum, and Polish Radio Programme 2 was on – they usually play classical music or jazz but you can also hear a fair bit of folk or even some kind of experimental music, I’m not really sure what genre exactly it should classify as, it’s generally considered a very sophisticated radio station by many. 😀 I was just at such a time where I was looking for some new Polish music, especially folk music, that I could like and listen to, and I heard this song I’m about to introduce to you. And I decided I liked it a lot. It was so very strongly folksy while at the same time with just as strong neo- feel because of the jazzy instrumentation, and I loved the lyrics.

This band’s name can be translated to The Boys vs Basia in English. The Basia in the band’s name is the leader, vocalist and frequently the lyricist Basia Derlak, while the boys are the other members.

I don’t think I’d be able to write a quality literal translation of this song, so I’ll try to simply explain to you what it’s all about.

It tells the story of a girl who is pasturing her mare by the water, and just at the same time God is sailing there in His boat, rowing with his leg. The girl tries to discourage Him from sailing closer to her, saying that she is young and likes to sin, and tells him to sail to the nearest village where there are good, married girls and not to look at her because He might yet see the devil, and she is not worth His Eyes. God tells her that he sailed from heaven and just wanted to look at her for a moment. But she insists for Him not to do so, because she is young and sin doesn’t hurt, and tells him to come back in ten years, and then he’ll be able to look at her to His Heart’s content. So ten years passed, the girl turned into a woman, but God isn’t coming. “Perhaps  something happened to the Divine boat?” Finally, even two hundred years passed by, and the girl turned into a crone. She is waiting and waiting for God, and pasturing her mare again. But God forgot about the crone, who was standing by the water, called His Name and stomped her foot at eternity.

I like how subtly pawky it is and how you can interpret it in a few different ways. I am Christian as you may know but once talked about it with someone who was atheist and we both understood it totally differently, it blew my mind. 😀

Song of the day (10th November) – The Harriet Earis Trio – “Cadair Idris” (Idris’ Chair).

Hey people! 🙂

This is a very new group for me, which I first heard on Blas Folk Radio Cymru and thought their music was very interesting. The Harriet Earis Trio, consisting of Harriet Earis on Celtic harp, Andy “Val” Coughlan on double bass and Sam Christie on drums makes a sort of jazz-folk fusion. Harriet Earis is a young harpist from England who currently lives in Aberystwyth and has studied Irish, Scottish and Welsh harp, so in her music she draws from the Celtic harp tradition of all of these countries, but also goes beyond the tradition. I am generally not a jazz person, although you may know that thanks to my faza on Cornelis Vreeswijk I’ve become more flexible in this regard and I do like some jazz now, thanks to Cornelis), but still this is far from being my favourite genre and even jazz with a very prominent harp doesn’t always convince me, for example I don’t really feel harpist Dorothy Ashby’s music. But I like what this trio is making, I really do! I like how spontaneous and unconventional it all is and the whole idea of Celtic jazz has a little bit of a quirky feel which I love.

This particular piece is called Cadair Idris which is the name of a mountain in Wales. It is located in Snowdonia National Park in northern Wales, on the territory of former county Meirionydd/Merionethshire which is part of Gwynedd these days, near the town of Dolgellau. It is a popular place with hikers. Its name means Idris’ Chair and refers to Idris Gawr (Idris the Giant) a medieval prince of Meirionydd, who won a battle with the Irish on this mountain.

Gwenan Gibbard – “Cân Y Lleisoniaid/Cân Y Droell Bach” (Song of the Lleisons/Song of the Little Spinning Wheel).

Today I’d like to share with you a set of two harp songs by my most favourite Welsh harpist – Gwenan Gibbard. She is from Llyn Peninsula in north Wales, and apart from being a harpist, she’s also a singer, and a Welsh language native in whose life music has always played a huge part since her early childhood.

Sadly I have no idea about who composed these songs, whether it’s Gwenan herself or whether they are traditional, but since I cannot find any info I think it’s safe to assume that they’re traditional. The first song is called Song of the Lleisons in English – Lleison is simply a Welsh surname. I’m curious who they were. I really like this composition as it is so melancholic and so very beautiful. And the other is Song of The Little Spinning Wheel, which has a much more happy, upbeat feel which is also why I like it a lot. I don’t know which one I like more. Do you have a favourite?