Question of the day.

How old were you when you learned to read? Did you learn by sight memorisation, or sounding out letters?

My answer:

I wrote a post answering a similar question before, so I won’t write a lot in detail here. If I remember correctly, I was about 7-8 when I learned to read and it was through memorisation.

How was it with you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

What was the last book you read?

My answer:

Hm, lemme see… Ah yeah, Here Be Dragons by Sharon Kay Penman. I think I was mentioning in some coffee share or something like that a few months ago that I was reading The Brothers of Gwynedd quartet by Edith Pargeter, which my penfriend recommended to me, about the Welsh prince Llywelyn (or Llewelyn as he’s spelt in the book) the Last. I really enjoyed that, even just because it was the first historical novel set in Wales that I didn’t cringe at. I’m not a history buff or anything like that, not even an expert in the history of Celtic countries, but even I was able to see some – sometimes quite glaring unrealistic-ness in historical novels set in Wales that I read before, and if I can spot something like that it often peeves me in fiction, or at least certain kinds of books. But also I really enjoyed that series for a lot of other reasons and it was a delicious read, so I went on a quest to find something at least a bit similar in that it would be reasonably realistic and also well-written and just enjoyable for me. So that’s why I decided to read Here Be Dragons, which is the first book in the Welsh Princes series, telling the story of Llywelyn the Great, who is not to be confused with Llywelyn the Last whom I mentioned earlier.

That was a great book too, although I think I prefer Edith Pargeter’s writing style, well, at least for this kind of books. But I didn’t have to cringe at it either, and I liked that the characters were well-developed and not wishy-washy. It was a bit difficult to get actually involved in for me and the beginning felt very slow-paced, even though I normally have no problem with slow-paced books if I like them overall because I don’t mind relishing a book and not racing through it, because I usually feel like I read too fast anyway and that I would have liked to be able to enjoy a book for longer. ๐Ÿ˜€ This one really did drag a bit in some places. But, overall, it was a very positive experience.

You? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

What was the last book you read?

My answer:

I’ve just finished a great non-fiction Polish book “W Salonie I W Kuchni. Opowieล›ฤ‡ O Kulturze Materialnej Polskich Paล‚acรณw I Dworรณw W XIX Wieku” (In the Salon and Kitchen, the Story of Material Culture of Polish 19th Century Palaces and Manors). I like to read about how people used to live in terms of daily lives, and I just got this book a few days ago in our online library for the blind over here, it was just added I believe, so I grabbed it straight away. It was all about how those palaces and manors looked like, what all the rooms were for, what people did in each of them, what the furniture was like, how people started using different things in their households and how they were changing over the years, what people ate, when, in what way, how different customs of that time had evolved, how the cuisine was changing over time etc. etc. etc. It was written in quite an engaging way so that made it an easy read, and I read it in no time. There were also some interesting new words for me that I liked. ๐Ÿ˜€ I got also strongly convinced that 19th century Poland wouldn’t probably be a place where I’d like to live, or at least not in a palace/manor. ๐Ÿ˜€ For one very simple reason. Too many people everywhere! I’ve heard a lot about Slavic/Polish hospitality but only reading this book I ttruly realised to what kind of extends it went, how people had guests or were visiting someone ALL the fricken time, plus there were a lot of people in such households anyway – big families, servants, residents and the like. – I’d go crazy in a week.

How about you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Reading Wrap-Up (January 4, 2021) #IMWAYR

And the first MIMRA is with its winner now!
I’m thrilled that Astrid received her readership award today, which she mentions in this post.
It’s her reading wrap-up post, so go check it out to find out what she’s been reading lately, and is planning to read next. Maybe you can find some books here that you’d also like to read. ๐Ÿ™‚

A Multitude of Musings

#IMWAYR

Hi readers and fellow book lovers! I have been reading relatively much lately, so I can do another reading wrap-up today. As usual, Iโ€™m joining in with Itโ€™s Monday! What Are You Reading? (#IMWAYR).

Life Update

Iโ€™m doing pretty well right now. Got a lovely package from Emilia of My Inner MishMash in the mail today. Itโ€™s for her readership award. The package contained some great food and non-food items. I must admit though that I ate all of the caramel fudge and am now a bit nauseated (or is it nauseous?).

What Iโ€™m Currently Reading

Still reading Hatch by Kenneth Oppel. I had let it lie there for a bit while reading other things, but I started it back up and itโ€™s really intriguing.

I also finally picked up Still Alice by Lisa Genova. I previously finished two of her other books and had started in

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Question of the day.

Hi people! ๐Ÿ™‚

What is something that is making you feel good, these days? ๐Ÿ™‚

My answer:

Misha’s presence is always making me feel good. Right now he’s sleeping on the wardrobe and he has spent almost the entire day with me.

The cooler weather is making me feel good, too. The summer heat has been quite exhausting for me, and for Misha too, also for my Mum and I think for a lot of people as it was really a long time and at times felt insanely hot, and I’m really glad that it’s cooler now, it feels very pleasant outside.

The fact that my Dad’s at work so I don’t have to deal with him for a few days ๐Ÿ˜€ – he’d had quite long holidays recently and now he’s gone back to work yesterday. It gets unpleasant and stale when you’re spending so much time with someone and you’re not really on the same wavelength at all.

Music. I’ve been listening to lots of great music, but that’s nothing new. Also my great speaker and headphones that I’ve got myself recently and that I use with my iPhone. I really love my computer speakers as well, but, as I always listen to something quietly at night, it wasn’t as much of a pleasure listening to something at night on them, with all the accompanying hum of my desktop computer.

Food always makes me feel good as well. Today we had very yummy chocolate budyล„ with Mum. Mum makes it on her own, it’s not the instant, shop-bought budyล„. I think I’ve explained somewhere on here earlier what budyล„ is, but if you don’t know, it’s kinda like a creamy Polish pudding. Only Mum put a bit too much chocolate into it, and while it was extremely delicious, it was really, really sweet, and neither of us was able to eat a lot. ๐Ÿ˜€

Books make me feel good. Right now I’m reading a very amusing Polish book, which is basically an anthology of different texts from mostly Polish literature, but not only, from different time periods and genres, all about cats! I’ve just started it today in the morning but I think it’s going to be very enjoyable for me. And the last book I read was “Harriet and the Cherry Pie” by Clare Compton, a lovely English children’s book, the style and plotline of which reminded me very strongly of Noel Streatfeild, and I like things like these. Since the main character lived in her great aunt’s cafe, there was lots of food involved.

How about you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day (13th August).

Hi people! ๐Ÿ™‚

Do you read or watch TV before falling asleep?

My answer:

I always read before going to sleep. I also listen to the music before I fall asleep and while I’m sleeping, as that helps me with anxiety and also I just like it this way. I read on my PlexTalk, and have a sleeptimer on, so that the book doesn’t keep on going or at least not too much when I’m already asleep. And in the background I have my iPhone quietly on, just enough so that I can hear it, either playing music on Spotify or some radio. If it’s radio it’s either playing some station which plays only music, and such that I really really like, and there are only few stations whose music I’d love so unreservedly, or, more often, it’s just talk in one of my favourite languages. Sometimes I also listen to some podcasts in bed but that’s rather if I’m not planning to go to sleep just yet.

How is it with you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

Hi people! ๐Ÿ™‚

Simple question:

What are you reading? ๐Ÿ™‚

My answer:

As you should be able to see in the GoodReads widget, Im reading a foster care memoir by Maggie Hartley called “Exploited”. I read almost all of her memoirs that were available on Audible, but it seems like most of them, or at least quite a few, are not, so now I’m getting them from Kobo. I’ve started this book last night before going to bed, and then didn’t sleep too well, falling asleep after 2 AM and waking already about 6, but didn’t dare getting up and doing something more constructive because I had Sofi sleeping with me since Mum’s away so she is afraid to sleep on her own, and Misha was sleeping between us and I didn’t want to wake either of them up, so I spent a large portion of the night reading it, and now I’m almost at the end. It’s been enjoyable like all Maggie Hartley’s books have been to me but also rather very predictable. The next book on my list is “Thinking in Pictures” by Temple Grandin, I’m curious what it’ll be like and how I’ll like it.

How about you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

Hi people! ๐Ÿ™‚

What is a single least favourite book, that you have finished reading anyways or was required to read?

My answer:

Hm, usually I don’t waste my time on reading books I don’t like and when I can’t get into it for a long time and it doesn’t look like I’m going to become interested in the plot line any time soon, or if something bothers me strongly, I just put it away. I find it a bit hilarious how some people wade through books they don’t like just because they’ve started something and have a sort of mental tradition that they must finish every book they have started no matter what. My Mum is like that, and I sometimes feel for her because I find it the worse when someone takes a long time to read one book like she does because she doesn’t have much time for reading, so instead of quickly starting something new and more interesting, she’s tormenting herself with one, boring book for months. I have to have a really sound reason and determination to read a book I don’t like, or have to feel very strongly forced, but, although I really enjoy reading books I like and read ALL the time, I even cheated with school compulsory readings quite frequently, because I didn’t like most of them. There certainly must be some books that I’ve read whole despite not enjoying them and not liking them at all, but currently I just can’t think of anything.

Oh, I was just going to publish this post when something did came to my mind, lol! That was the first (longer) book that I read whole despite not being interested in it one bit, and it was quite a hilarious and strange thing. When I was just starting school, I think I’d just learned to read fairly fluently and started to enjoy it thoroughly, I once went to the library to get brothers’ Grim Fairytales – my Mum read them to me countless times and made me love all sorts of fairytales and other folklore creations at a very early age as you may already know – because I finally wanted to read them myself and I was absolutely excited about it. I asked the librarian for it and was presented with an extremely, deliciously heavy book, and got back to my room and immediately started to read it. I was very surprised by its content, though, it wasn’t anything like what my Mum read to me. There was no Red Riding Hoods, Rapunzels and the like, but loads of strange, long words and names that were completely unfamiliar to me. I hadn’t read many actual books by then really, and was still learning to navigate them and the whole literary world, so I was thinking, perhaps it was some sort of an introduction, foreword… whatever, and kept on reading, there was no actual table of contents either as far as I remember and I was thinking maybe it was important to read it when reading the whole book, as it happens with some books. I actually don’t know why I kept on reading it so determinedly and diligently, it was completely unlike me, and why I didn’t realise that perhaps something was wrong with it that it’s so very off topic and didn’t notice anything, or at least try to skip the boring pages instead of reading it page after page, and I’ve read quite a fair bit of it I believe, even though I remember literally yawning at it and was growing more and more discouraged, so, I think it was quite silly. Even though I didn’t make the conclusion myself, which, as I said, I find weird a little, but maybe I was just too new to the literary world, someone finally helped me. A volunteer who was working in our boarding school group at the time once went up to me and asked what I was reading, and I told her that brothers Grimm, but it’s not really quite as interesting as I thought and doesn’t really remind me in any way of what my Mum used to read to me. She asked me if she could have a look, and then we were both surprised because the book I was reading was definitely no fairytales! I don’t know the English title of this book if it was translated to English, but it was by Vitus Drรถscher and it was about animals, but not quite something that would be fitting for children of my age then. It was quite scientific and geeky and if I remember correctly, it was about some rules and behaviours that different animals have. And I was never an animal/nature geek very much, even when I read magazines for children and there was always a more or less extensive article on how different wild animals live, I usually was happy to skip it. So the mystery was finally resolved! ๐Ÿ˜€ They had to make a mistake at the library, probably based on the signature of the book or something. I really loved reading though, and it was what I usually did when I didn’t have anything more interesting to do or just in my free time, and I think I didn’t go with that book right away to the library but don’t remember why, perhaps it was the weekend, or perhaps I didn’t have an opportunity or anyone to go with me, or perhaps I was anxious of peopling with people I didn’t know very well, but I think I had that book with me for a while yet and am pretty sure that, even though it felt even more boring now that I knew what it was about and that there wasn’t going to be anything interesting further, I kept on reading it for a few more days when I had nothing better to do and wanted to read something. And since as I said I was a fairly fast reader, I think I may have read it whole, or if not whole, then at least the greater part of it. ๐Ÿ˜€

You? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

Who taught you to read?

My answer:

Since despite multiple attempts and good will my parents have never learnt Braille, moreover, doubted I’ll be able to learn it when I was little, I learnt to read at school, as I think the vast majority of blind people would. In spite their doubts, it really didn’t take me that much time to master it. I didn’t like reading at the beginning, but once I’ve become more fluent at it I grew to love it and my teacher was actually saying I read way too quickly and too much (no idea where the boundary between enough and too much lies in this case ๐Ÿ˜€ ). Nevertheless, when she found out that I feel slightly bored with the stuff we had to read at school, for some time she wrote little stories for me that I could practice reading during longer school breaks when I was at home, they were all – just as I wanted it – about a little boy named Jacek. These weren’t hard to read either, especially that I would tell the whole plot to her earlier so she’d know what to write, and I was actually the one making them up, but at least that was fun and not boring and felt quite special to me. ๐Ÿ˜€ I guess though that with time it became a bit of a pain in the neck for her, haha, so I had to move on and start writing stories myself which turned out to be even more fun as no one would understand my ideas as well as I do!

How about you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day (1st July).

What was the first book you remember reading?

My answer:

I guess I did a post on that in the past myself, don’t know if it was as a part of question of the day series, so rather than writing the whole story again, I’ll just simply say that it was “God And The Mouse” by Angela Toigo. Very boring, and too short for my reading skills haha, read it in one afternoon.

What was yours? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day (27th June).

Do you read a book in one sitting or over multiple days?

My answer:

It really depends, but I guess it takes me a relatively short time compared to most people I know to read a book. Probably because I read more, because I have a possibility to read more, paradoxically. I read before falling asleep, after waking up, when riding/commuting, when I’m bored and have nothing else to do, waiting for anything, sometimes even when I’m eating a meal or having a bath or anything basic like that. And if something interests me, I can just sit with it until I finish it, or sometimes I will relish it as long as possible, though I rarely can read a book longer than a week, becauseI simply read too often and in too big chunks I guess.

How about you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day (26th June).

Hi people! ๐Ÿ™‚

Here are some more bookish questions for you. ๐Ÿ™‚

Can you read while hearing music?

My answer:

Sure. I am a multitasker, as long as it doesn’t require coordination or other such skills, and I like listening to music while reading. I almost always do, and it actually helps me to focus even more and feel more absorbed by a book. I like to listen to music that could work as a soundtrack to the book I’m reading. I love both listening to music and reading so why not do both at the same time.

How is it for you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

Hi people. ๐Ÿ™‚

My another book related question for you is:

What is a book you can always reread?

My answer:

I like rereading books I love. Those that mean a lot to me in this or that way, that are very pleasurable or that just evoke a lot of emotions. Or even just those books that maybe even don’t have that much of a power over me but I read them during some good time previously and want to refresh the memories while reading, that’s also a good motive for a reread for me. My most most most favourites I can reread even once a year. Like the Jeลผycjada series by Maล‚gorzata Musierowicz – I know all books in it and even remember fragments of some of them by heart, I’ve read them since I was maybe about Zofijka’s age, but still rereading them makes me laugh at the same things and I still love them no less. –
Or “Emily Of New Moon”. Or another author that I love rereading is Sigrid Undset, I don’t even know why, I love some of her books but not the way I love “Emily” for example. It’s also very true that each time you reread a book you’re very likely to look at it from a different perspective, which is an interesting experience for me to observe.

How is it with you? ๐Ÿ™‚

{CATEGORY Diary,Books]

Question of the day.

What is a book you dislike that everyone else seems to love?

My answer:

“Harry Potter”, “Twilight” and other trendy stuff that people get mad about. I just don’t feel it one bit. I tried convincing myself to “Twilight” but I actually really dislike books about vampires they are so odd and I just don’t see what’s so appealing about them. Especially about the romance part, ugh, a vampire like Edward Cullen is certainly not my type of a guy. One thing is I simply don’t like most of the fantasy genre, so it’s just boring for me. And another is that if everyone seems to love something, I will most likely dislike it. ๐Ÿ˜€ That’s just how I am. There are exceptions, but I won’t like something, or even I won’t usually read something, just because everyone else does.

What is such book for you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day (20th June).

What’s your favourite author?

My answer:

My favourite Polish author is definitely Maล‚gorzata Musierowicz, I’ve written about her loads of times on here, she’s an author of a lovely book series that I just love to pieces. And my favourite foreign author is Lucy Maud Montgomery. But I find “Anne Of Green Gables” slightly overrated. I do like her but she’s written so many other great books that are underappreciated because everyone sees only Anne who’s not as interesting as some other of her heroines like Emily Starr from “Emily Of New Moon” or Valancy Stirling from “The Blue Castle” for example. And I don’t like that people always think that her books are only for children. Well my Zofijka is a child, a tween, and she doesn’t even understand “Anne Of Green Gables”. I think with Montgomery’s books is a bit like with “The Moomins” or “Winnie The Pooh”, everyone associates them with children and reads them in childhood, but it’s only when you grow up that you start really understanding them and seeing them from a different angle.

How about your favourite author? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day (19th June).

What is a book you’re currently reading?

My answer:

Some time ago, my Polish blind friend introduced me to British author called Cathy Glass, who is also a foster carer and writes foster care memoirs, and we both loved them. The problem was though that few of them were translated to Polish and even fewer we could find online so that we could read accessibly. My ENglish wasn’t quite good enough for reading a book in it. But, funnily enough and coincidentally, some years later I started to be more active in the English Internet, way more than in the Polish part of the Internet as it soon turned out, and I joined a mailing list for blind people with mental health problems, and a lot of people there like Cathy Glass too, and other similar authors, so I started to be interested in it again, and learnt that Cathy’s books are on Audible. So I could have a fun way of expanding my English via reading her books, although truth be told I’ve never had many problems with vocabulary whatsoever reading her books, they areeasy peasy, so maybe now is the time to move on to Shakespeare for me, or something equally sophisticated. ๐Ÿ˜€ And I’m still catching up on books by her that I haven’t read yet, and I’m doing this at the moment too, and just finishing a book by her called “A Baby’s Cry”, which I find very interesting and engrossing. The next book I’m going to read is also by her – “Saving Danny”, and then I’m going to change the direction for a while and will read a delicious Polish book that I’ve been looking forward to read for quite a while but just got hold of recently, which is about my favourite patron saint – st. Hyacinth, I got it from my Mum. – His actual name is Jacek, he’s my Dad’s patron saint, and mine too, even though I am not a Jacek, I’ve just always loved him and felt a connection and was interested in his life. I’ve even got an icon of him in my room.

How about your current read(s)?

Question of the day (18th June).

What’s your least favourite book?

My answer:

I have no clear idea. Usually, if I strongly feel like I dislike a book, I won’t bother reading it unless I have to for whatever reason. Overall I didn’t particularly like most of the compulsory readings we had at school, like most people. I am usually not a fan of fantasy, sci fi, paranormal and crime stories, unless they’re about something very specific that I’m into or just have something that I can love about them, but I don’t like these genres as such mostly.

Question of the day (16th June).

Do you prefer hardcopy or paperback?

My answer:

I nowadays only read ebooks/audiobooks or via my Braille display if I’m able to despite it really reserves to retire finally but I still try to read something on it, and sometimes I have to, so I don’t read physical books anymore. In a way it’s good because Braille books are of course very unpractical and large and expensive and difficult to access and not everything is printed in Braille, but on the other hand I regret because I actually do like reading physical books, it’s nice. But even when I did read physical books it didn’t matter to me that much if it was a paperback or a hardcopy, I liked both the same, unless they weren’t too flimsy.

You? ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day (15th June).

Hi people. ๐Ÿ™‚

I’m back with some questions for you, and they’re all book related, here goes.

How many books is too many books in a book series, in your opinion?

My answer:

For me it simply really depends if I like the series. If I like it a lot, I really don’t mind if there are even 30 books in it or more, I’ll be always craving for more anyway. If I don’t like it, I’m not gonna care for it anyway, whether it’s a series, or not a series. If I feel kind of in the middle about some series, as in I like it but not love it and am not crazily involved in it, I guess more than 5 books in a series can be confusing, especially if it’s a family saga for example. You confuse people, or events, who is who, what happened when, that does happen to me sometimes anyway. Or if it’s a sort of series that you should rather read in order, I might be in trouble if I am not able to find all of the books in it in an accessible format, and then it gets even more confusing, so the smaller the series the bigger the chance I can actually find all of it somewhere, that’s most often the case.

What do you think? ๐Ÿ™‚