Question of the day.

Hi people! πŸ™‚

What is a single least favourite book, that you have finished reading anyways or was required to read?

My answer:

Hm, usually I don’t waste my time on reading books I don’t like and when I can’t get into it for a long time and it doesn’t look like I’m going to become interested in the plot line any time soon, or if something bothers me strongly, I just put it away. I find it a bit hilarious how some people wade through books they don’t like just because they’ve started something and have a sort of mental tradition that they must finish every book they have started no matter what. My Mum is like that, and I sometimes feel for her because I find it the worse when someone takes a long time to read one book like she does because she doesn’t have much time for reading, so instead of quickly starting something new and more interesting, she’s tormenting herself with one, boring book for months. I have to have a really sound reason and determination to read a book I don’t like, or have to feel very strongly forced, but, although I really enjoy reading books I like and read ALL the time, I even cheated with school compulsory readings quite frequently, because I didn’t like most of them. There certainly must be some books that I’ve read whole despite not enjoying them and not liking them at all, but currently I just can’t think of anything.

Oh, I was just going to publish this post when something did came to my mind, lol! That was the first (longer) book that I read whole despite not being interested in it one bit, and it was quite a hilarious and strange thing. When I was just starting school, I think I’d just learned to read fairly fluently and started to enjoy it thoroughly, I once went to the library to get brothers’ Grim Fairytales – my Mum read them to me countless times and made me love all sorts of fairytales and other folklore creations at a very early age as you may already know – because I finally wanted to read them myself and I was absolutely excited about it. I asked the librarian for it and was presented with an extremely, deliciously heavy book, and got back to my room and immediately started to read it. I was very surprised by its content, though, it wasn’t anything like what my Mum read to me. There was no Red Riding Hoods, Rapunzels and the like, but loads of strange, long words and names that were completely unfamiliar to me. I hadn’t read many actual books by then really, and was still learning to navigate them and the whole literary world, so I was thinking, perhaps it was some sort of an introduction, foreword… whatever, and kept on reading, there was no actual table of contents either as far as I remember and I was thinking maybe it was important to read it when reading the whole book, as it happens with some books. I actually don’t know why I kept on reading it so determinedly and diligently, it was completely unlike me, and why I didn’t realise that perhaps something was wrong with it that it’s so very off topic and didn’t notice anything, or at least try to skip the boring pages instead of reading it page after page, and I’ve read quite a fair bit of it I believe, even though I remember literally yawning at it and was growing more and more discouraged, so, I think it was quite silly. Even though I didn’t make the conclusion myself, which, as I said, I find weird a little, but maybe I was just too new to the literary world, someone finally helped me. A volunteer who was working in our boarding school group at the time once went up to me and asked what I was reading, and I told her that brothers Grimm, but it’s not really quite as interesting as I thought and doesn’t really remind me in any way of what my Mum used to read to me. She asked me if she could have a look, and then we were both surprised because the book I was reading was definitely no fairytales! I don’t know the English title of this book if it was translated to English, but it was by Vitus DrΓΆscher and it was about animals, but not quite something that would be fitting for children of my age then. It was quite scientific and geeky and if I remember correctly, it was about some rules and behaviours that different animals have. And I was never an animal/nature geek very much, even when I read magazines for children and there was always a more or less extensive article on how different wild animals live, I usually was happy to skip it. So the mystery was finally resolved! πŸ˜€ They had to make a mistake at the library, probably based on the signature of the book or something. I really loved reading though, and it was what I usually did when I didn’t have anything more interesting to do or just in my free time, and I think I didn’t go with that book right away to the library but don’t remember why, perhaps it was the weekend, or perhaps I didn’t have an opportunity or anyone to go with me, or perhaps I was anxious of peopling with people I didn’t know very well, but I think I had that book with me for a while yet and am pretty sure that, even though it felt even more boring now that I knew what it was about and that there wasn’t going to be anything interesting further, I kept on reading it for a few more days when I had nothing better to do and wanted to read something. And since as I said I was a fairly fast reader, I think I may have read it whole, or if not whole, then at least the greater part of it. πŸ˜€

You? πŸ™‚

Question of the day.

Who taught you to read?

My answer:

Since despite multiple attempts and good will my parents have never learnt Braille, moreover, doubted I’ll be able to learn it when I was little, I learnt to read at school, as I think the vast majority of blind people would. In spite their doubts, it really didn’t take me that much time to master it. I didn’t like reading at the beginning, but once I’ve become more fluent at it I grew to love it and my teacher was actually saying I read way too quickly and too much (no idea where the boundary between enough and too much lies in this case πŸ˜€ ). Nevertheless, when she found out that I feel slightly bored with the stuff we had to read at school, for some time she wrote little stories for me that I could practice reading during longer school breaks when I was at home, they were all – just as I wanted it – about a little boy named Jacek. These weren’t hard to read either, especially that I would tell the whole plot to her earlier so she’d know what to write, and I was actually the one making them up, but at least that was fun and not boring and felt quite special to me. πŸ˜€ I guess though that with time it became a bit of a pain in the neck for her, haha, so I had to move on and start writing stories myself which turned out to be even more fun as no one would understand my ideas as well as I do!

How about you? πŸ™‚

Question of the day (1st July).

What was the first book you remember reading?

My answer:

I guess I did a post on that in the past myself, don’t know if it was as a part of question of the day series, so rather than writing the whole story again, I’ll just simply say that it was “God And The Mouse” by Angela Toigo. Very boring, and too short for my reading skills haha, read it in one afternoon.

What was yours? πŸ™‚

Question of the day (27th June).

Do you read a book in one sitting or over multiple days?

My answer:

It really depends, but I guess it takes me a relatively short time compared to most people I know to read a book. Probably because I read more, because I have a possibility to read more, paradoxically. I read before falling asleep, after waking up, when riding/commuting, when I’m bored and have nothing else to do, waiting for anything, sometimes even when I’m eating a meal or having a bath or anything basic like that. And if something interests me, I can just sit with it until I finish it, or sometimes I will relish it as long as possible, though I rarely can read a book longer than a week, becauseI simply read too often and in too big chunks I guess.

How about you? πŸ™‚

Question of the day (26th June).

Hi people! πŸ™‚

Here are some more bookish questions for you. πŸ™‚

Can you read while hearing music?

My answer:

Sure. I am a multitasker, as long as it doesn’t require coordination or other such skills, and I like listening to music while reading. I almost always do, and it actually helps me to focus even more and feel more absorbed by a book. I like to listen to music that could work as a soundtrack to the book I’m reading. I love both listening to music and reading so why not do both at the same time.

How is it for you? πŸ™‚

Question of the day.

Hi people. πŸ™‚

My another book related question for you is:

What is a book you can always reread?

My answer:

I like rereading books I love. Those that mean a lot to me in this or that way, that are very pleasurable or that just evoke a lot of emotions. Or even just those books that maybe even don’t have that much of a power over me but I read them during some good time previously and want to refresh the memories while reading, that’s also a good motive for a reread for me. My most most most favourites I can reread even once a year. Like the JeΕΌycjada series by MaΕ‚gorzata Musierowicz – I know all books in it and even remember fragments of some of them by heart, I’ve read them since I was maybe about Zofijka’s age, but still rereading them makes me laugh at the same things and I still love them no less. –
Or “Emily Of New Moon”. Or another author that I love rereading is Sigrid Undset, I don’t even know why, I love some of her books but not the way I love “Emily” for example. It’s also very true that each time you reread a book you’re very likely to look at it from a different perspective, which is an interesting experience for me to observe.

How is it with you? πŸ™‚

{CATEGORY Diary,Books]