Resirkulert – “Áddjá” (Grandfather”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Time for a song in Sami! I guess I didn’t share one on the Sami national day (February 6) so it’s really long overdue, but until now, I didn’t really have any specific ideas what Sami song I could share with you. I’ve known this one for quite some time but came across it recently in my music collection and thought it would be a good fit.

Resirkulert (which translates to Recycled in English) isn’t really a Sami band, in that, as far as I know, they have no other songs recorded in that language and most of the members are not Sami. They seem to be quite popular on the Norwegian music scene, although, while I listen to a lot of Norwegian music I don’t have a very good idea what’s actually popular with Norwegians and what’s not really because I don’t really know the language, only via Swedish, don’t listen to Norwegian radio stations and don’t know many Norwegian people. Still, Resirkulert seems like a fairly well-established band in their home country. They come from the very north of Norway, and only one of their members – the vocalist, Emil Karlsen – actually is Sami. This joik (a piece of traditional Sami music, usually with little to no lyrics, dedicated to, or should we rather say extremely closely associated or expressing the essence of, a person, an animal etc.) is Emil Karlsen’s grandfather’s joik. I find it so interesting that, from what I gather, it’s like Sami people each have their own joik which somehow describes them and who they are and is like an essential part of their identity, it’s so interesting to have a specific tune so strongly incorporated in yourself, that other people can’t sing to you (apparently it’s not the thing to sing it yourself, I guess it would be a bit egotistical). It’s quite abstractive but also very appealing to me, probably partly because of its abstractivity. 😀 What I also like about joiks is that they, despite being such an old singing tradition, can go extremely well with modern instrumentation and generally our contemporary music genres, which you could have already noticed from a few Sami songs I’ve shared before. I mean, obviously there’s loads of neofolk, electrofolk, folk pop and what not from around the world and it often sounds just as good as traditional folk, but something really clicks between joik and contemporary music vibes.

A fun fact I once learned is that Áddjá, while it generally means grandfather, can also relate to any older/elderly adult with whom you have a friendly relationship and who perhaps shares his wisdom with you or something like that. Moreover, Áddjá is apparently also used in the Sami land in reference to a BEAR! So I guess that shows what kind of relationship they have with bears, traditionally. As someone who loved bears as a kid very much, I like the idea.

Katarina Barruk – “Evelina”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I have a song in Sami for you! Sami music is beautiful, and, although Sami languages are all endangered, they are cultivated anyway and music is being created in them as well as other kinds of art.

I’ve come across this particular singer very recently in Sveriges Radio Sápmi, where they played this song of hers. I really liked it immediately so that it’s now one of my Sami favourites. When I then wanted to learn something about Katarina Barruk, I believe it was from the comments under the videos with her songs on Youtube that led me to thinking that she must be Norwegian, because many of them were in Norwegian. However, today I learned that she is an Ume Sami speaker (there isn’t just one Sami language but multiple ones) and Ume Sami is apparently spoken only in Sweden these days, so she must be Swedish. Also, what’s very intriguing that I learned today is that apparently Ume Sami has only about TEN speakers! It’s very sad and depressing, but isn’t that so amazing that they make music even in such rare languages?! I find it really wonderful and exciting.

Mari Boine – “Gula Gula”.

This is a typical, classic example of a Sami joik, and I really like the feel of it! Sadly, again, I was unable to find a reliable translation. One that I found, but somehow don’t think it’s perfecty reliable, would indicate that the song is about the Earth, that it is our mother and that people need to go back to their roots and where they come from, and save the Earth from the pollution. And gula would mean listen.

 

Song of the day (28th September) – Herman Rundberg ft. Mari Boine – “Fillii Fillii”.

Hi guys! 🙂

I’d like to share with you a couple of songs by the sami singer from Norway – Mari Boine. – She is quite known in the folk music world, I’ve even heard about her quite a few times in Polish media, and she is surely the most widely known Sami musician. She not only does yoiks and typical Sami music, but she also blends it with other genres, like jazz, or pop. And this piece is quite an interesting mixture of electro/dance and folk. Sadly, Sami languages, even the most popular North Sami in which I assume Mari sings, is not widely known, hence the lack of an English translation online, and I can’t even tell you what Fillii Fillii is supposed to mean, I have no idea. I hope I will know some day. The song is cool though.