Question of the day (18th April).

And your three words for today are…?

My answer:

Misha, Toffifee, sleep.

Yours? 🙂

(Syn)Aesthete, or a brief explanation of some top secrets of my freaky brain.

While I’m blind, so visual value of things around me isn’t always of great importance to me, I still consider myself an aesthete.

A language aesthete. It particularly applies to my mother language, but also in all the other languages I know it is important to me to write and speak possibly aesthetically – which doesn’t always mean very seriously, politely or flamboyantly, but above all just so that it is nice to read or listen and doesn’t make other innocent individuals cringe too much. I also like when other people speak or write aesthetically, and when someone messes up with spelling a lot or uses words like they don’t know what they mean, it often drives me crazy, or close to it.

I am a total language geek and besides being an aesthete as long as I can remember, I am also a synaesthete.

Since my very early childhood, I’ve had some weird connections in my brain between sounds/words and touch, or taste, or something else sometimes. For many years I was convinced that this is just how our brains work, not just my own quirk, and that everyone perceives things the same way as me. That led to many weird, and often funny nowadays, misunderstandings, for example when I tried to describe things to people.

It was not until I was like 6 that I started to see others don’t necessarily think in shapes, textures and tastes and other things like this.

Many years after I got to this conclusion I realised it has to be some form of synaesthesia, although as far as I know this form isn’t very common, that your brain transfers sound stimuli into touch related associations. I know only one person who has it similar to me in some way, and he is also blind, so I guess it has to do with my blindness, and maybe also a little that I still am somewhere on the autism spectrum apparently.

If you don’t know or don’t understand how synaesthesia works, it’s like there is a correlation between two (or more) of your senses. Most people of those who have synaesthesia seem to have auditory-visual corelations, for example they hear a sound, and see it in colour, or see numbers in colours, or even people may have their own colours apparently, or words, or colours may have particular textures/temperatures for them, etc. etc.

For me it is so that if I hear or think about a word, at the same time I sort of feel what I associate with this word. It’s not like a delusion, I know I don’t feel it, I’d rather say it’s like when you hear a song in your head. You know it isn’t playing, but you still hear it in your head.

For me it’s not only words that I associate with shapes/objects/textures/tastes, but also many separate sounds, like sounds of particular instruments, people’s voices etc. And these aren’t always sound to touch or sound to taste associations. Sometimes it’s much more complex and not always on just sensual level. Sometimes, hearing a particular word or phrase makes me feel in a very particular way, or I may even sometimes associate words or phrases with whole scenes or lots of different, unrelated things, etc. Some words I associate with objects that I can’t recall ever seeing, so I guess they have to be made up by my brain or something. I associate many words with edible things, which is quite fun, or with things that have to do with nature. I often can associate many words that aren’t objectively similar to each other with the same thing.

it’s very complicated.

I think it’s also synaesthesia that helps me understand the colours in some way, anyway I don’t know what else it could be. I am blind since birth so have no practical idea about colours, but I’ve always had some imaginary idea about colours, and even many distinct shades. It’s often very hard for me to describe them, it’s hard to put it into adequate words, but when I was in integration school years ago, I learned that my understanding of colours isn’t that far from how they really are as I could think. My classmates were doing something with one of Picasso’s paintings during art class, and since I of course wasn’t able to do the same, the teacher asked me questions about all the colours, just out of curiosity, like very speciffic questions about colours – whether they’re calm or vivid, dark or bright, warm or cold, etc. And both her and me were incredibly surprised when I said all of them right. 😀 Of course I’d already got some basic understanding of colours, like that the sun is yellow or the sky is blue, but no one had taught me about how to actually define colours nor described them for me since it’s rather impossible.

I don’t know any other person who would be congenitally blind and have it like that, people usually don’t care about colours, or have to learn about them from others, like have to memorise what colours fit together when they choose their clothes, but I am lucky and I just somehow get it, despite that I see literally nothing (and no, it isn’t black! It’s just nothing). It’s just so so weird, but I like it. It often helps me with writing for example short stories, and describing people, one of my blind friends told me that “Wow! you write as if you were sighted!” hahaha whatever that means, I guess it was just it, that I can create people and nature that looks naturally and is colourful, some blind people tend to understandably forget about visual details or sometimes make them feel not matched or not very precise.

And yet another thing that my synaesthesia helps me with are languages. So many language learning experts and teachers say it’s good if you associate every word you learn with something. I don’t have to think about the associations. They just come to me on their own. That makes things easier to remember, I guess. And more fun, and interesting. And if you have it like this it’s just normal and obvious that you’re fascinated with words. Some of my associations may be scary or something, but most of them are very positive, creative and quirky. If I’m learning a language that is a bit out there for me (like Welsh was for quite a while, despite my love for it), forming associations may take some time, you need to listen to the language a lot and immerse in it, familiarise your brain with it, and then it comes naturally. Though there still are words – even in Polish – that I don’t have clear associations with, sometimes the shapes I see in relation to them are sort of blurred, or hard to describe, or like a few unrelated things strangely and not very harmoniously stucked together. It is not a perfect strategy for learning a language, because as I said there are many words that I associate with the same things, and I may confuse them. Normal people may confuse words that are similar in sound or meaning or something and it happens to me too, but usually I confuse words because I associate them with the same/similar things and then my statements can seem a bit enigmatic for an uninitiated  person, if the words aren’t objectively too similar. 😀 I’ve had lots of awkward situations in Swedish like that, and my poor teacher couldn’t figure out what I am talking about sometimes. 😀

 

I’m thinking about what example to give you to show you how my synaesthesia works. OK< let it be my Mum.

My Mum’s voice sounds like a piano to me. She has a rather dark voice, and when she speaks quieter/lower it reminds me of black, melted chocolate, the shade of her voice then is just similar, it just feels similar to black chocolate and I guess it is my dominant association with her as a whole. Also when I hear my Mum’s voice I feel as if I was touching the black keys of a piano. The word Mum – in all the languages I know so far, makes me think about a little plastic hat that my favourite and oly doll that I ever played with – named Eliza – had when I was a kid. 😀 That’s very weird. The word Mum as it is written in English, I associate with a little baby sleeping soundly with a dummy, and this characteristic smell of a sleeping baby. The same smell always surrounds Misha when he sleeps or is freshly awake. My Mum’s name is Anna, and the name Anna I associate with a horse – its hair, the sound of a horse galloping, the smell of horses, etc. As I mentioned in a few of my previous posts I also have other types of special associations with names, and looking this way Anna is a pure essence of femininity to me, but I won’t go into details about how I imagine a typical ANna – her appearance, personality etc. that would be way too long, I might write name characteristics some time in the future on my blog maybe. Other things I associate with my Mum are the colour black and the sound of the French language, but these aren’t only about synaesthesia, because my Mum loves black, and was learning French at school, though she doesn’t speak it now.

any other synaesthetes of any kind out there? How does your synaesthesia manifest? 🙂

Or maybe anyone would like to know what things I associate with something? Some people seem to find it quite entertaining for some reason. 😀 Feel free to ask if you’re curious about anything, be it any word/sound or any questions you have as for this thing in general, I know it’s pretty rare and I realise how weird it is, so I’m open to your questions if you have any. 😀

 

Word of the week – gwyliau.

This week’s word is a Welsh one, and, like the last one which was Polish, it is also very summery, and, to me, sounds very cute.

This word is gwyliau, gwyliau means holidays. I don’t think there is a better word in any language to describe holidays.

The singular form of gwyliau is gwyl, which, in the accent I am learning – which is northern welsh – is pronounced: /ɡuːɨ̯l/ .

Why do I like this word so much?

First of all, because it sounds just like summer holidays. So idyllic and warm. And cute. It sounds different than the last week’s word, but it has so many similar associations for me.

When I hear the word gwyliau, my synesthetic associations that come to my mind are berry fruit, their shape and taste, lapping streams, shining sun, laughing children. Another association – rather unrelated to the holidays, but definitely sensory – are balls of a ball bearing, a rather small one. I was often playing with balls from bearings as a kid and there are words that I associate with them for some reason. 😀 I often associate words with things I touched often as a little child. Gwyliau, also similarly to the last week’s word lipiec, sounds quite “round” to me, and maybe that’s why I associate it with it. Also, when I think of gwyliau, I think of fresh peas, also quite summery thing.

But, there’s yet another reason to why I love the word gwyliau. It sounds quite similar to my crush’s name, Gwilym, or Gwil. There are lots of similar words in Welsh, that sound similar to the name Gwilym, like gwylio – to watch – for example. And I LOVE them all!!! They’re so cute, so beautiful, so… gwilicious! 😀

I also have an audiofile for you, with my Welsh speech synthesiser saying gwyliau, so that you know how it sounds exactly. Her accent is southern, if it makes any difference for you.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/uke5tkw8il3t1cw/Gwyliau.mp3?dl=0

What comes to your mind when you hear gwyliau? DO you like this word? Does it remind you of holidays, or rather something different?

Swnami – Gwenwyn (Poison).

Hi guys. 🙂

This is one of the first Welsh language bands that I’ve ever heard, and one of my most favourites. They are an indie rock band from Dolgellau, and I think they’re really good. “Gwenwyn” is my most favourite song by them.

I actually like the word gwenwyn a lot. I don’t know if I’ve ever told you how I once fell in love with the word gwanwyn, which means spring in Welsh. I was like “Oh wow! That would make for such a beautiful, fresh and unique girl name. I don’t think it would be usable anywhere else than English-speaking countries, as it is pretty easy to pronounce for an English native, but still I really liked the idea, even as a character name. As you may know, there are lots of -wyn names in Welsh. The -wyn ending is traditionally reserved for boys as far as I know, and -wen is for girls, but since it’s gwanwy, not gwanwen, I thought it should stay in this form, and that it would be better for a girl despite a -wyn ending, because a name that means spring, in my opinion, is more usable on a girl than a boy.

So I even used Gwanwyn as a name of one of the characters in one of my Celtic mythology inspired short stories. And then I discovered this Swnami song, and again, was like “Wow, gwenwyn! Wouldn’t it make a brilliant baby name? Kinda modern and with a Celtic twist to it. It’s even way better than Gwanwyn!”. I really loved the word. Quite foolishly though I didn’t even look up its meaning lol. I wrote about it to one of my Welsh friends, how I think Gwenwyn sounds fabulous, and could make a briliant girl name, that it’s gonna be my most favourite Welsh word. and he was like: “Well but, do you know it means poison?”. It was ridiculous, but I was sorta disappointed that such a beautiful word has such a negative meaning. Now I think though, that the meaning ads even more spice to the word, however I wouldn’t name anyone Gwenwyn just because it sounds beautiful. 😀

The song is very cool as well, and I hope you enjoy it. 🙂 Here are the English Lyrics:

Step by step
One by one the pieces fall in place
The perfect picture to fill the void
Before the door opens to the crowd
Don’t make the mistake
Don’t believe for one second
The hollow words you have been fed
The hour is coming
You’ll be ready to fight
Don’t lose your hold on yourself
And don’t descend into the water too fast
You must let go
But the deceptive claws hold tight
While the poison still flows through the bond
Turn your back on the voices you drag behind you
Break the link that joins you
And walls demolish the wall
Don’t make the mistake
Don’t believe for one second
The hollow words you have been fed
The hour is coming
You’ll be ready to fight
Don’t lose your hold on yourself
And don’t descend into the water too fast
You must let go
But the deceptive claws hold tight
While the poison still flows through the bond
You’re trying to let go
But the deceptive claws hold tight
While the poison still flows through the bond
You must let go
But the deceptive claws hold tight
While the poison still flows through the bond
Just turn your back, scatter the cards, fall back

Word of the week – lipiec.

I’m very pleased to introduce my new series to you, which is called word of the week, which can feature words from any languages, that have something special to them in my opinion. I hope you’ll find it fun, or maybe even inspiring for your new posts. Don’t know for how long I will be doing this, but if it’ll be enjoyable for us it may become a regular feature on my blog. If you have any suggestions regarding the series or any words you’d like to see featured and that you think deserve more attention, please feel free to let me know. So, this week’s word is lipiec.
Lipiec: LEE-pyets, means July in Polish. It is derived from the word lipa (LEE-pah), which means linden, because of lindens blooming in this month.
While its core word lipa isn’t my very favourite – besides linden it can also mean trash or shoddy or generally something of bad quality, or a lie – I really like the word lipiec. I’ve always liked it. For me it sounds just cute. I can’t precise why though. It has such a soft, childish, yet sort of romantic sound to it, it’s really a perfect, sweet name for a summer month.
As you know, I have sort of synesthetic associations with words, or phrases, or other types of sounds, they’re usually tactile.
My main association with the word lipiec are clip-on earrings. Particularly the clip-on earrings my gramma had in the past, I really liked them, but most of clip-on earrings look to me like lipiec as well. I usually don’t know from where my associations derive, but I suppose this one could be because of the -lip part both in the word lipiec and clip-on.
I have also other associations with the word lipiec that are clearly synesthetic and many of them have to do with nature. For example, I associate the word lipiec not surprisingly with linden leaves, but also privet leaves for some reason, tulip petals and muscari petals, blackberries, and many berry fruits. For some reason the word lipiec makes me think of little babies, particularly asleep, maybe because of how childish it sounds to me. Generally lots of ball- round-shaped things I can associate with this word, because it sounds quite round to me.
I often seem to have even taste associations, and the word lipiec is for me forever connected with… salted peanuts! They just taste like lipiec.
I can have just the same associations with some other words, for example those related to lipiec, or that sound similarly, anyway these are my main synesthetic associations with this word.
I know it may seem strange and unrelatable for you, but for me words have always been sort of multisensory, which always helps me with learning new languages, writing, finding inspiration in the words, etc. I quite like it, even if it’s weird and I know only one person who has it similar, and he’s also blind.
My more normal associations include my Mum’s nameday, which is in lipiec, heat, holidays, fun, happiness, and generally lots of idyllic things.
I can’t say lipiec is my most favourite month – it’s usually pretty hot – but I can surely say it’s the month with the most beautiful name.
Something else I can tell you about lipiec is that it is also a Polish surname, and there are quite a few others derived from linden.
I’ve made an audiophile with one of my Polish speech synthesisers (called Jacek) saying this word, so you can get how it sounds naturally as English phonetics are pretty poor in comparison to Polish and it’s hard to explain things just with writing. https://www.dropbox.com/s/8qetmz42ol06nws/Lipiec_.mp3?dl=0 I hope it makes things a bit clearer for you.
What are your thoughts on the word lipiec? What comes to your mind when you hear it? Do you like it, or do you prefer July, or in any other language?

Time to reveal…

…the truth… about both of my new blogging ideas. I don’t know yet whether I’ll bring them to life, particularly one of them, which hugely depends on whether you’ll like it, and that’s why I need your opinion.

The first one is a name game. I stole the idea from Behind The Name, where there are lots of different name games. While I’m generally not the best and not always inspired to create name games myself, I thought this one would be great to do with you. Though I need you to tell me before I’ll run it, whether you like it and whether you’d like to play it. I think it’ll be good to have at least 4 people playing. Here are some basic facts about the game.

It’s an adoption agency type of game and I would call it “Emisha’s Adoption Agency”. It’d be a very personalised name game, for all those who have any interest in names, but also those who don’t know much about names and aren’t particularly interested, but are interested and like children, are welcome. Those who don’t particularly love children in general are welcome too, it’s just an imaginary play, I myself am not very much into children either, apart from my sis, but I love helping people to name their kids. You’d have to make up a family – be it imaginative, or your own, or any family that you know, or just you – who want to adopt a child, or children. I will make a form that I will post here, and all you have to do is make a post replying on your blog – or do it in the comments – if you prefer. Just paste the form, fill it in with the information about the family, their preferences about the kid(s). Adoptions can be global, which imo makes it more fun namewise, the more that we’re all from different places.

Then, I will match your family with the kid(s) that suit them. So, I will name them, and will give you a bit of an info about their background. I will make a separate post on my blog for each player’s family, and pingback it to their post where they filled in the form, or if you filled it in the comments I will comment on one of your posts and notify you that I’ve matched your family. If there will be more people playing, it may take me some time to match the families, so please be patient.

Then the next thing is actually not obligatory, but very welcome, and it adds more fun to the game. You can make another post – or leave it on my blog in comments section, as you wish – about how your family is doing with a new member(s) and how the new one(s) is/are settling in. It depends on you how fast the time is passing in this game so you can write about them after two, five, or ten years, or as many as you wish, after the adoption. As I said this isn’t obligatory to do, but I’d love to hear about your family and how are they doing.

If you won’t particularly like the child(ren)’s name(s), if they’re babies or toddlers you can change it, that happens often in international adoptions as far as I know, but if they’re older, it may be a problem. Therefore, apart from the normal form, there will be an optional section, which you can fill with the names that you like, to give me some hints about your taste. I won’t use any of those names for your child(ren), but I will use them as inspirations to give them a name that you’ll like.

So that’s it, very briefly, I’m looking forward to hear whether you’d be up to playing it or not and if so, I think we can start it some time at the beginning of July. Also let me know if you have any questions, or suggestions about it.

And then there is my second idea, which is another series of posts, to accompany question of the day and song of the day. It would be weekly. I thought it would be good if I did something linguistic on my blog more regularly. And, with the help from some other people, I came up with the idea of a word of the week series. But, there wouldn’t be just English words. There would be words from any language in the world, even from those that I don’t speak and even from those that I’m not particularly interested in, although words from the languages that I know would probably dominate since most of the words I know and love are in these languages I knwo and love. There would be words that I like, love, that interest me or that sound funny to me, that annoy me or that I just hate, or that have anything else that makes them indifferent to me. I would add some info about them, like their usage, or definitions, or my associations, also the synesthetic ones, and how I feel about it, or whatever else would come to my mind about them. There are lots of new words that I come across every week and I think so is with everyone of us. Also words can be very inspiring, and I thought that maybe after the death of Daily Post and their word prompts, my weekly word choices could be an inspiration for someone else’s post. I need to think about it more and make it a bit more clear and concrete in my brain, and think how I could make these posts even more inspiring, because if you get a foreign word, it often may be hard to relate to it in any way, but that’s the basic idea of this series.

What do you think? Would you be interested? Do you have any thoughts about it? I am already always writing down the words from all the languages that appeal to me in any way, or that draw my attention either positively or negatively, but if I’m gonna do it on here, I think I need to know what’s my readers’ opinion about it. 🙂

So that’s it, looking forward to read your thoughts. 🙂

My fav word *long post*.

Another challenge I’d like to take part in this week is #WYF hosted by Eve over at Revenge Of Eve

What’s my fav word?

As I saw Eve’s post, my first thought was “But, in which language?”. 😀 Guys I have so many favourite words, in so many languages, not only in thesE i am able to communicate in but also other my favourite languages which I didn’t start to learn seriously yet. I even had a time in my life when I was doing a yearly ranking of my favourite words. I am a lover of words and languages and linguistics so this is a damn hard question to answer and I am afraid I won’t be able to answer with just one word, it’s simply impossible, but I’ll try to narrow it down somehow, although am not sure if I’ll manage lol.

OK so in Polish, my mother tongue, my all time favourite word is kulka (KUWL-kah). It means a little ball. I just find it very charming. When I was a little girl, I was playing a lot with glass and metal balls, I just liked them a lot and I liked the word kulka equally. I like how flexible it is. The big ball is kula (but not the ball you can play sports with, this one is piłka), a bit smaller is kulka, smaller than kulka is kuleczka, kulcia, kulinka, kulisia, whatever, the case of your creativity.

My other favourite Polish word is mózg (muwsk) which means brain. I am very interested in brain in general, but none of the languages I love and know how brain is called in them, has an equally nice word for it. I just love to use it whenever possible, even overuse it in some eccentric ways, I use it more than I realise. I can even say when I have a headache that my mózg is aching. Sometime ago my Mum was washing her hair and someone rang to our door, I opened and the person wanted to see Mum, and was quite astonished when I informed her that Mum is washing her mózg. 😀

From some more international words that exist in Polish I love miszmasz or mish mash, it’s so funny and nice to hear. It means the same in Polish in case you wondereD

From some older, a bit colloquial and maybe even archaic for some people words I absolutely adore wydudlić (vi-DUWD-leech, or something close to it any way). It’s an old, underused word meaning to drink something very quickly and greedily. We also have wtranżolić (vtrahn-ZHAW-leech) which means to eat something quickly and greedily, although it doesn’t have this slightly childish feel as wydudlić has.

For swear words my favourite is pierniczyć (pyer-NEE-chich, well English phonetics can’t manage it!). It’s an infinitive, often used in an expressions like “Ja pierniczę (a bit of an equivalent of fuck it or something). THe word pierniczyć or the phrase ja pierniczę doesn’t have any particular meaning as far as I know other than being a swearword, but it’s related (at least etymologically) to the word piernik – ginger bread. It’s such a fantastic swear word, although rather light. Cholera (haw-LE-rah) is one of the words I use in more harsh situations and literally it means the same as in English, as a swearword it’s an equivalent of damn. Cholipa (haw-LEE-pah, the same swear meaning, but not so expressive) is also funny, or its charming diminutive cholipcia.

Recently I’ve come across a deliciously old and archaic, very colloquial word – pitigrilić się – for having sex. I just felt in love with it, pity it seems to be no longer in use.

Oh, and I can’t resist to not mention a very modern, every day word, which doesn’t sound like it originated here, but I don’t know where it did. It’s gites (GEE-tes). Someone asks you how you’re doing and if it’s like really really cool you can just say it’s gites. Or simply git.

OK, that’s for Polish.

The word that would climb very high in my yearly ranking if I did one last year would be glimpse. I love this word more and more. It sounds a bit magical. I like many simple words in English, for example I’ve been in love with the word sleep since early childhood. It’s so soothing and… I dunno, sleepy lol. But in a nice way. I love the word hijack. It sounds so ridiculous like “Hi Jack!”, but I like it for that. I like the name Jack, you know. 😀 From more sophisticated words (oh yes, I love sophisticated!) I adore mellifluous. It’s so mellifluous, I guess we don’t even have the exact word for it in Polish, I mean like a literal translation of it. And there are so many more, but I don’t want to bore you and make this post longer than necessary. But I need to mention one more word which is cringy.

Now let’s talk about Swedish words a bit.

My favourite Swedish word is krim kram. I guess it also exists in other Germanic languages like Dutch or German, although I’m not sure. Krim kram means pretty much the same as English knick-knacks. But krim kram sounds more lyrical and funny at the same time in my opinion. In Polish krim kram are called bibeloty, and this is also a fantastic, old-fashioned word. There are loads and loads of fascinating Swedish words. As for my absolutely favourite Swedish swearword, well if you speak Swedish it won’t be anything very exotic – I love skit. Skit is pronounced similarly to the word sheet, but sk is quite a weird sound, although I can make it I don’t know how to explain it to other people. It means shit, but I love how creative Swedes are with using it. First of all, it is milder than shit, and heard almost all the time among young people. It’s not like a normal word you’d use in any situation, but a very mild swearword. ANd it may also mean dirt of any kind. It’s a bit like English fucking, you can just throw it in a conversation to strengthen the negativity of what you’re talking about. But they also use in in a positive context, like “Det är skit bra” (This is shit (very) good), Du är skit kull” (You are shit cool). ANd that was kind of new to me and I liked it a lot, to use skit to accentuate something positive. It’s just such a skit cool word.

Then another language I speak a little bit is Welsh. I love, love love the word pilipala (simply pee-lee-pah-lah). It means butterfly and omg it’s so charming, isn’t it? I like words that have pil in them, they’re cute in some way. It often makes me wonder how different impressions this nice little insect might make on people in different languages. We in Polish have motyl – which sounds pretty elegant for me, like a butterfly slowly unwinding its wings and majestically soaring over the meadow. Swedes have fjärill – it’s also a cute, little word, but in a different way than pilipala. Pilipala is funny and kinda mischievous, but fjärill is very lyrical and almost poetic, it has some nostalgic vibe for me, don’t know why. Germans have their schmeterling (don’t know how it’s written as I’ve learnt German only for three years at school, so excuse me if it’s wrong) and it sounds so heavy. I mean, many people don’t like harsh languages, I like them a lot, but schmeterling just doesn’t match with what it means, imo. I’m not a big fan of French and other ROmance languages, they just don’t speak to me, but French papillon is adorable and when I hear it I feel like this word somehow flies, is light and smooth, just delightful. Dutch vlinder is cool, but it’s hard for me to picture something particular when I hear it. But oh gosh, as much as I love English, I don’t like the word butterfly. What I see in my mind when I hear it and focus on it, is definitely not a butterfly. It is simply a fly, desperately wagging its wings in the butter. Ew… Yuck! I don’t know who created this word, but it’s a little bit weird.

Oh gosh what a long digression!!! but well, I’ll leave it… you can always skip it if you want, but I’ll leave it to show you how freaky my mózg can be at times haha.

ANother Welsh word I like is hiraeth. I’ve mentioned it smetime before on my blog. Hiraeth means a longing or yearning to something that basically doesn’t exist. It’s usually in context of your home country, when you’re an emmigrant, and you’ve seen your motherland years ago, idealised it, but it’s not like in your mind. It has changed, plus as I said, the picture in your mind is idealised. But it can also regard anything. I very often experienced hiraeth as a child, that’s probably why I resonate so much with this word. Also I’ve heard from my Welsh friend that hiraeth is a longing for something you can’t precise for some reason. And that’s also a thing I’m familiar with.

I would also like to mention a very expressive Wenglish phrase here. It’s actually Wenglish. Wenglish is easily enough a combination of Welsh and English, mainly spoken in the south of Wales, in the valleys. Actually, in the form I like it the most, it apparently isn’t seriously used. They have three words for describing the feeling of rage, anger, madness… These are: tampin’, fumin’ and ragin’. I love them all! And I’ve heard that there was a series in Wales called “The Valleys” and one of the characters used to say “I’m tampin’ fumin’ ragin'”! I loved it immediately as I’ve heard about it. ‘Cause when you like all these words, why make a choice or compromise? Use them all! I love how accurately they describe it when you’re super mad. It doesn’t happen often to me, but when it does, it’s really hard and overwhelming, and it’s really like tampin’ fumin’ ragin’.

Lastly (I promise!)  I want to tell you about my favourite Finnish swear word. I don’t speak Finnish, I know some basics, and my Finnish friend who is also blind taught me a lot of swearwords and other handy expressions like that, but that’s all I can say in Finnish for now. Nevertheless I love this language. It sounds so cool and calm, or at least it seems so, it seems to me just like Finns, but because they always accentuate the first syllable, in my opinion, their language sounds like what you say is very significant. So it’s perfect for declarations of love, or hatred, or releasing your silent anger. You don’t have to scream when you swear in Finnish, just put enough expression in what you say and the rest will come on its own. My favourite swearword of all those I know in Finnish, is vittu, which means cunt or pussy and it is used like fuck in English. For some reason I like it much more than English fuck. It’s also the most popular Finnish swearword apparently. I also like to use perkele, which means devil, or helvetti for hell, or even Swedish helvete with the same meaning, also used in Finland very often.

If you speak any other languages than your native, do you like to swear in it/them, even if not in the country where it’s spoken? I like it a lot and it’s fun, although of course not in all circumstances, sometimes I guess it may lead to pretty awkward situations. 😀 I’ve had a few, but they turned out to be pretty funny. My school friend used to joke I have to be possessed, because she heard somewhere that when people are possessed they swear in multiple languages. 😀 I doubt it though, that would be a rather weird sign for me and sounds like taken out of some paranormal book. 😀

OK, sorry for making it so long, but really wanted to share with you my at least a few most favourite words, and maybe hear what yours are, and what you think of all these i mentioned.