Delyth Evans – “Gymnopedie III”.

Hey people! 🙂

Recently I shared with you one of the Gnossiennes composed by Eric Satie and played on the harp by Floraleda Sacchi, and today I’d like to share another, and I guess more commonly known, composition by Eric Satie – the last of his Gymnopedies. – Gymnopedies are three pieces of music that Satie composed for piano, all very melancholic pieces (the first is meant to be played painfully, the second sadly, and the third – the one we’ll listen to today – gravely) and I’ve heard quite a few different harp performances of them and I really like how they sound played on the harp. The name of these pieces comes from some ancient Greek festivity called gymnopaedia, during which young men were dancing naked/unarmed. I have a little bit of a personal connection with Gymnopedies because when I was in nursery, there was a documentary that was being filmed about our nursery (for the blind) and how we lived in there. Then all of our parents got a copy of this film. I now know that my Mum hated that film, but she watched it a lot anyways especially when I was away at school and then she always ended up crying. Once I grew up a bit I never liked watching it either or people mentioning it, something about it is very depressing to me though I’m pretty sure it’s just in my brain and all sorts of memories coming up rather than the documentary itself being objectively depressing. Anyways, gymnopedies were in the soundtrack of this film. I actually don’t remember now if it was all of the Gymnopedies or just one, and if one then which one, because I haven’t watched that in ages nor has my Mum, but I am sure that there was at least one Gymnopedie. I guess Gymnopedies are a sort of go-to soundtrack for all things that are meant to be tear-jerking because I’ve heard them used a lot in this way. This is actually a bit of a pity, because they’re great pieces of music, and while they’re melancholic, it’s not in a tear-jerking, maudlin way. But despite my Mum hated that film, she really liked this music and wanted to know what it is, and finally when she found out she bought some music album where Gymnopedies were included, I don’t know who played them. And she still really likes them despite they sometimes make her think about the times when I was at school and how it made her sad that I couldn’t be at home with my family. And that’s why, when it comes to me, what I primarily associate Gymnopedies and what they make me think of when I hear them is my Mum, rather than the time when I was in nursery, which I’m so glad about, because otherwise they’d probably be totally spoilt for me, and as it is, I really love them. Especially, like I said, played on harp. This third, grave Gymnopedie in A minor is played by the already well-known harpist on this blog, Delyth Evans (currently Jenkins) from Wales.

Jack Vreeswijk – “Tjuvjägaren” (The Poacher).

Recently, I shared with you a theme piece from Amir Chamdin’s 2010 film “Cornelis” about Cornelis Vreeswijk, which was composed by Cornelis’ son, Jack. Today I want to show you that this film was not the only close encounter Jack had with the world of film during his music career. There is a Swedish historical film from 2016, directed by John Tornblad, it’s called Tjuvjägaren which means the poacher in English, and the poacher is the main character of this film, however IMDB claims that this production is known in English under the name Lars and the Baron – Lars is the name of the poacher. – The theme song to this film was written by its director, as well as cinematographer Andreas Olsson, and is sung by none other than Jack Vreeswijk! I have to admit that I’ve never watched the film, despite I’ve wanted to because it sounds rather interesting, but somehow it never happened, mostly because with all my practical issues around film watching it feels like a huge undertaking and I’m not sure my motivation is equally huge. 😀 But ever since I’ve heard this song for the first time, I really really like it, and I think Jack vocals fit it so well.