Sofia Talvik – “Aha-Aha”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   I told you yesterday that today I’d be sharing one more song by Sofia Talvik, and so here it is. This time however, it’s her original song, and unlike the two previous traditional, very folky songs, this one is Sofia’s original song and I think it reflects a lot more what Sofia’s music is like as a whole, as, like I already said when writing about her, she’s a lot more Americana than folk, also with some country leanings. I don’t really like or feel country, despite a lot of people think it has a lot of common ground with folk and in a way it certainly does as they both influence each other to an extent and overlap a bit, but as much as I love folk with all my brain, I think it’s fair to say that country is one of the genres that I like least. But there are some artists whose music I do like to listen to sometimes even though they are influenced by this genre or even stuff like bluegrass, more or less strongly, and Sofia Talvik is one of them, I guess because the Nordic vibe which is also strongly present in her music makes it a lot more digestible for me. 😀 And I actually really like the sound of this song. It comes from Sofia’s album BIg Sky Country, released in 2015, which was self-produced by Sofia under her own label Makaki Music, and most of the material on this album was also written by her alone. I believe this is one of her more popular songs. 

Sofia Talvik – “Du Som Har Mitt Hela Hjärta” (You Who Have All of My Heart).

   Hiya people! 🙂 

   Today, I’d like to share withh you yet another song from Sofia Talvik’s 2014 album titled Folk. It is my second favourite from this album, right after Ut I Vår Hage which I shared yesterday. I like this song in general, but I haven’t yet come across a version that I’d like more than Sofia’s. I can also already tell you that tomorrow I’ll also be sharing a song by Sofia Talvik, except not quite so folky and in English. Like yesterday, the translation for this folk tune comes from 

Sofia’s bandcamp. 

   

You who have all of my heart
You who are all of my joy
Come and ease my pain
Without you I’m not satisfied

I will then in darkness wander
with my sheep I lose my way
When I see all the others
each get their own love

Why do you keep me waiting
Why do you stir my heart
When I miss you so
Why should I live on without you

Death may take me now
This life is much to hard
I will follow all your laws
in the first years of my youth

Even though I might seem happy
When others are around
I can’t release the pain and worries
I carry in my heart

My lips are smiling, but my heart it bleeds
And I say I am alright
But in silence I hurt
and say goodbye to happiness

You who have all of my heart
You who are all of my joy
Come and ease my pain
Without you I’m not satisfied

Sofia Talvik – “Ut i Vår Hage” (Out in Our Meadow) & Hanna Turi “Ut i Vår Hage”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   For today I have a very popular Swedish folk tune for you all. A tune which I’ve actually already shared before on here, performed by My Bubba. Today I’d like to share the other two of my three favourite versions of this song, one by Sofia Talvik and the other by Hanna Turi. I seriously don’t know which of the three I like more, each is absolutely amazing in its own way. This is a traditional song which apparently a lot of Swedish people know, regardless of whether they’re into folk or not really, because it is or used to be taught at school, and it’s also often sung during Walpurgis Night celebrations, there are also loads of various choral arrangements of this song. Aside from that I just really like the three mentioned versions of this song and that it’s just lovely overall with all the flowery imageries, I’ve already said when sharing My Bubba’s version that I also like it because the plants mentioned in this song could work so well as beautiful, obscure baby names. Specifically akvileja (translated in the translation below as granny’s bonnet), salivia/saliveja (sage) and krusmynta (spearmint). I’ve actually even thought hypothetically that I could name a potential kid Salivia, but at some point it occurred to me that, in an Anglophone setting, it would be probably inevitable that people would associate it with the English word saliva. That’s a pity. 

   The first of the two versions that I want to share with you is as I said by Sofia Talvik, a singer who is generally more Americana than folk, but folk is clearly close to her heart as well, and this tune comes from her album which is actually titled as simply as that, Folk. She is from Gothenburg and apparently also enjoys some popularity in the US. 

   I’ve already shared one song by Hanna Turi called Ricochet inn the beginnings of my blog. Her actual name is Hanna Berglund and she seems to be more widely known as a graphic designer or something along those lines, and Hanna Turi is the name under which she is known as a musician. 

   The translation comes from Sofia Talvik’s Bandcamp. 

   

Out in our meadow blueberries grow
Come lemon balm
If you want to see me I’ll wait for you there
Come roses and granny’s bonnet
Come lilies and come sage
Come sweet spearmint
Come lemon balm

Pretty little flowers bids us to dance
Come lemon balm
If you want me to I’ll bind you a wreath
Come roses and granny’s bonnet
Come lilies and come sage
Come sweet spearmint
Come lemon balm

I’ll put the wreath in your hair
Come lemon balm
The sun may set but our hope it will rise
Come roses and granny’s bonnet
Come lilies and come sage
Come sweet spearmint
Come lemon balm.  

   Sofia Talvik: 

   Hanna Turi: