Question of the day.

If you could gain perfect fluency in any language instantly, but only one language, which would you choose?

My answer:

Oh my, this one’s so hard! I’d like to be perfectly fluent in ALL my languages, as quickly as only possible. But… one language… I think I’m going to go with the most difficult one out of the ones I want to learn, which I guess would be Sami, especially considering the small amount of speakers and even smaller of resources. If I could be fluent in any of the Sami languages (preferably Luleå Sami but any will do) that would be very helpful.

You? 🙂

Katarina Barruk – “Evelina”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I have a song in Sami for you! Sami music is beautiful, and, although Sami languages are all endangered, they are cultivated anyway and music is being created in them as well as other kinds of art.

I’ve come across this particular singer very recently in Sveriges Radio Sápmi, where they played this song of hers. I really liked it immediately so that it’s now one of my Sami favourites. When I then wanted to learn something about Katarina Barruk, I believe it was from the comments under the videos with her songs on Youtube that led me to thinking that she must be Norwegian, because many of them were in Norwegian. However, today I learned that she is an Ume Sami speaker (there isn’t just one Sami language but multiple ones) and Ume Sami is apparently spoken only in Sweden these days, so she must be Swedish. Also, what’s very intriguing that I learned today is that apparently Ume Sami has only about TEN speakers! It’s very sad and depressing, but isn’t that so amazing that they make music even in such rare languages?! I find it really wonderful and exciting.

Mari Boine – “Gula Gula”.

This is a typical, classic example of a Sami joik, and I really like the feel of it! Sadly, again, I was unable to find a reliable translation. One that I found, but somehow don’t think it’s perfecty reliable, would indicate that the song is about the Earth, that it is our mother and that people need to go back to their roots and where they come from, and save the Earth from the pollution. And gula would mean listen.

 

Song of the day (29th September) – Mari Boine – “Alla Hearrá guhkkin Osllos” (Hey, Mr. Almighty Down There In Oslo).

Here’s another Mari Boine’s song. I originally wanted to share it with you on one of the future Sami National Days (February 6), but I might as well do it now ’cause why not. This is a very interesting song for someone like me who is passionate about endangered languages and rights of the speakers of such languages, media in endangered languages and all that. I have no English translation for you, and I can only clearly understand one word in the Sami lyrics – “giella” which means language. – But, hey, not all is lost! There is a part in Norwegian in the lyrics, and actually, that Norwegian bits and pieces are of very deep historical and personal value for me, because that was the very first thing I was able to understand in Norwegian. I don’t speak Norwegian, mind you, but of course Swedish and Norwegian are close enough to be very much mutually intelligible. I used to be frustrated because I could never understand more than a word, or a small string of words in Norwegian, and that if I was lucky, I didn’t even understand svorsk too well (svenska – Swedish – +norsk – Norwegian – =svorsk). I still often don’t understand Norwegian too well but am often able to at least figure out the context. And that Mari Boine’s song was the first ever spoken – or sung, but I don’t think that matters – word, much more than a word actually, that I understood. Not all of it but I definitely got the gist of it plus some more than a gist, I’m not sure about one line. Bibiel is so smart, yayyy for Bibiel!!! 😀 And thus, Bibiel can tell you what the song is about.

“Hey, Mr. Almighty, down there in Oslo. Do you have time to listen to us? We watch Tv evening after evening, but don’t hear anything in our own language. Hey, MR. Almighty, down there in Oslo. Do you have time to listen to us? We listen to us? We listen to the radio day efter day, but hear hardly a word in our own language. Could you give us a little bit more? Language has such a great power [or your language has such a great power, I’m not sure] (…)”. And then I only understand that they are afraid of something, I am half-guessing that that their language will disappear. If there are some Norwegian peeps out there (or even better Sami!) I’d appreciate any corrections. I’m assuming that the Sami lyrics are mostly the same.

The song was released on Mari Boine’s 1986 album, originally, and, while I don’t know what was the situations with the Sami media back then, and I have no idea if they have their own TV right now, I do know that nowadays, there is a public radiostation called NRK Samiradio in Norway. I’m not well acquainted with it and I don’t know if it is sufficient for the Norwegian Sami community’s needs, but I’d think the situation has improved since the 80’s. There is also SR Sápmi to which I listen a lot, and some Finnish Sami radiostation as well. I also have no idea who the Mr. Almighty exactly is, as I don’t have a broader background context about the song.

Oh, and I forgot to mention one more interesting thing about Mari in my previous Mari Boine post. She is a paternal relative of Kevin Boine, whose song “Komm Till Finnmark” I featured on National Sami Day this year. Apart from the joiking, and even despite Mari’s huge musical versatility, the difference between their styles is vast and almost startling hahaha!

 

Song of the day (28th September) – Herman Rundberg ft. Mari Boine – “Fillii Fillii”.

Hi guys! 🙂

I’d like to share with you a couple of songs by the sami singer from Norway – Mari Boine. – She is quite known in the folk music world, I’ve even heard about her quite a few times in Polish media, and she is surely the most widely known Sami musician. She not only does yoiks and typical Sami music, but she also blends it with other genres, like jazz, or pop. And this piece is quite an interesting mixture of electro/dance and folk. Sadly, Sami languages, even the most popular North Sami in which I assume Mari sings, is not widely known, hence the lack of an English translation online, and I can’t even tell you what Fillii Fillii is supposed to mean, I have no idea. I hope I will know some day. The song is cool though.

 

Kevin Boine – “Kom Till Finnmark”/”Boađe” (Come To Finnmark).

 

Ok guys so as you know from the previous post which I reblogged from Watching The Swedes today is national day of the Sami people. Not only in Sweden, to be exact, but as it seems also in all the other countries where Sami people are a recognised minority. So, I’d like to celebrate this fact with some music, and I was looking forward to it for quite a while as it hasn’t been much of Sami music on my blog so far, just a couple of songs. On my last blog, the song with which I celebrated the national day of Sami people was Sofia Jannok’s song called “My Land”, and for a moment I intended to share this one here too especially that Sofia iS Swedish, and I know a lot of her music and like it, even if I don’t agree with all of her views wholeheartedly but that’s not what music is all about so I don’t care. But earlier today I decided it’s time to make some new Sami music discoveries, and not only in folk music, joiks and such, but generally, all the music that has been made all over Lapland. ANd I found lots of interesting things, just now in the last couple of hours. So you can definitely say that Sami music is a rare, very locally oriented, niche thing, but you can’t say that there is little of it, there is a whole lot of it. Well certainly not as much as say American music, but there is a lot of it out there. And therefore I decided on something else, not from Sofia Jannok’s repertoire. I was thinking that maybe I should pick something more, hm, folksy, traditional, more joiking even, but after some more thinking I believe that this is the best choice I could make.

Kevin Boine is from the Norwegian part of Lapland and if I understood well what I read, he is from Finnmark himself. It didn’t escape my attention that he shares his surname with another Sami singer – a worldwide famous one who is even somewhat acclaimed here in Poland and has fans here – Mari Boine. Well it turns out that they are relatives just as I thought. Although Mari’s style is quite eclectic, it’s still rather different from Kevin’s, because his music is something between hiphop and dance, it seems to be very popular in Norway now, and he has made a few hits. Most of his music is in Norwegian, but he started off in a Norwegian singing competition with a rap in Sami.

As for this song, it has two versions as you can see, one is in Norwegian and another one is in Sami, and as far as I can tell knowing only very small bits and pieces of Norwegian and even smaller of Sami, they’re translations of each other. I picked this song because I think it’s really suitable in a way. One of the aims why I generally make this whole song of the day thing on my blog is that I want to share music that people might not be aware of even existing, like Sami music for example, I just want to spread the awareness that there is more than just the hits you can hear in every single mainstream radiostation across the world. And so my aim today is the same, to share with people that Sami people also have their own music and that it’s good, to promote it as much as I can in one post and on my blog that isn’t that very famous. 😀 And I feel like this song could be perfectly usable if someone was to make a commercial advertising Finnmark, wanting to promote it for the tourists, hahahaha. That was just my first association, it would do really well in this function! So I think it could be also used to promote the Sami culture a bit in general, on this special day of theirs. And it’s so catchy, a real earworm, or a brainworm as I like to say. I think it’s very likeable. ALso it’s cool that it has two versions, pity though that the Sami version seems to only be available on Spotify. SO here are the two versions of it.

National day of the Sami – Sweden’s indigenous people

Happy National Day to you, all the great Sami people in Sweden! Any Sami people out there in the blogosphere? I love all the Sami languages, Sami culture, Sami music, I admire the Sami for being so determined and fighting for their own rights and their language(s) still surviving despite all that they’ve been through. So today I’m celebrating with them, and listening to lots of Sami music. And sharing this post so that you all can learn a little bit more about these people. I’m glad that Sami people also have their special day.

Watching the Swedes

Today is theNational Day of Sweden’s indigenous people – the Sami. So I thought I would share this blog again that I posted last year.

Did you know that Sweden has an indigenous people? I know, isn’t that cool?!

Just like Australia has the Aborigine and China has the Pamiri – Sweden has the Sami. For about 5000 years, the Sami people have lived way up in the arctic north of Sweden in thehomeland they call’Sapmi’. Today Sapmi actually covers not only Sweden, but also Norway, Finland and Russia. Historically, the Sami werereferred to as Lapps, but today this is deemed a derogatory term.

Today,February 6th,is the National Day of the Sami. Today,the Sami flag should be flown and the Sami national anthemis sung in the local Sami language.The first time this day was celebrated was in 1993 in Jokkmokk, Sweden.

The Sami are the only indigenous people in…

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Song of the day (4th January) – Jon Henrik Fjällgren ft. Aninia – “En Värld Full av Strider”/”Eatneme gusnie jeenh dåaroeh” (A World Full Of Battles).

So here’s Jon Henrik Fjällgren’s and Aninia’s song from Melodifestivalen. 🙂 Honestly I think “The Reindeer Herder’s Joik” is much better, and this one seems like made much more for mainstream, which it surely is, but I still like it and it’s cool. While Sami language is on my list of languages to learn and I love it dearly, I have no idea whether indeed “Eatneme gusnie jeenh dåaroeh” means the same as Swedish “En Värld Full Av Strider”, as I can only utter a few words in Sami, but at least I know for sure that “En Värld Full Av Strider” means a world full of battles. So here it is.

Song of the day – Jon Henrik Fjällgren – “The Rein Herder’s Joik”.

This is such a beautiful joik. If there are some people who don’t know what joik is, it’s such a way of singing, and a type of song, which is traditional for Lappland and Sami culture. I guess that since I first heard Jon Henrik Fjälgren’s joiking he is one of my most favourite Sami singers, be them joiking or not joiking, traditional or not, there aren’t many Sami singers whatsoever, or at least not very many that I know of. I think his joiks are particularly moving. But this one is my absolute favourite by him, I don’t even know why, but it’s just so stunningly beautiful! Isn’t it?!

And as for Fjällgren, his story is also very interesting. He was born i Cali in Colombia, lived in an Indian village for some time, and was moved to an orphanage from there. Later he was adopted by a Sami family from Sweden and lived with them in Mittodalen. He came to prominence when he took part in a Swedish talent competition in 2014. He also took part last year in Melodifestivalen (which is a Swedish contest during which the singer who will represent the country on Eurovision is selected) in 2017, with Aninia, and I will show you the song they sang together in another post. That’s what I know about him from both English

and Swedish

Wikipedia. So here’s the joik. 🙂