Holly and ivy names

I like Holly, and Ivy’s cool too, though I like it a bit less, but some of the names here are really great alternatives. My most favourite of these is Celyn – it’s also used for girls sometimes in Wales as far as I know – and Celynwen is lovely although I hadn’t heard it before, it has such a lilting sound to it. Also Zelenika is adorable, and I like the nickname Zelenka for it, although I guess Zelenka is also a Czech name in its own right.
On a side note, I really like the Polish word for ivy for some reason – which is bluszcz, I definitely wouldn’t advice anyone call their child Bluszcz as it would sound very odd, but the word itself is so, so lovely.
Which ones do you like? 🙂

Onomastics Outside the Box

In the spirit of the holiday season, here are some names meaning “holly” and “ivy.” The English names Holly and Ivy are obviously by far the best-known, but sometimes one wants a less-common variation. For those wondering, holly and hollyhock aren’t one and the same, though there are many names whose meanings relate to hollyhock.

This list also includes other languages’ words for “holly” and “ivy” (provided they sounded enough like realistic names), in which case I grouped them according to which sex I felt they’d best work with. As always, some of these names may be better-suited to pets or fictional characters than real-life children!

Unisex:

Leslie, or Lesley, comes from a Scottish surname derived from a place name whose ultimate origin was probably the Gaelic phrase leas celyn, “garden of holly.”

Female:

Celynwen means “white/blessed/fair holly” in Welsh. This is a rare name.

Hali is…

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Names ending in Z

I am generally rather neutral as for the letter Z in names, but I definitely love some names containing it, because it makes them sound crispy and ZZZippy. And lots of these ending in z have a particular, sort of exotic feel to me which is nice. I always loved Spanish Luz, I think it’s really full of ight in how it sounds, I don’t know maybe it’s my synaesthesia or autosuggestion but that’s how it feels to me, and there are lots of masculine names that I liked more or less in this post, but I guess I’d pick Luiz as my most favourite, especially that it is a masculine form of one of my all time favourite Polish feminine names, which is Luiza, since Luiza, apart from being a Portuguese name, is also Polish and Romanian.
Which ones are your favourite? Do you like names ending in Z? 🙂

Onomastics Outside the Box

I love names with the letter Z, whether they begin with a Z, have a Z in place of S (e.g., Izabella, Zofia, Jozef, Izydor), or end in Z. Many names ending in Z are of Spanish, Persian, modern Hebrew, and Arabic origin, but some come from other languages. I’m not including Hebrew names ending in TZ or Polish names ending in SZ, since those are their own letters/sounds.

Unisex:

Shahnaz means “pride of the king” in Persian. This name is also used in Urdu and Arabic. The Turkish, exclusively feminine, form is Şahnaz.

Paz means “gold” in Hebrew. This is an entirely separate name from the Spanish Paz.

Cruz means “cross” in Spanish and Portuguese.

Female:

Aliz is the Hungarian form of Alice. This name can also be rendered as Alíz.

Beatriz is Spanish and Portuguese.

Fairuz, or Fayruz, means “turquoise” in Arabic.

Inez

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