Question of the day.

What was the first book that made you feel like you really identified with the protagonist?

My answer:

Don’t know if it was the first, but it was definitely the book that made me identify with the protagonist the most of all books, and it’s the Emily of New Moon series. Which I actually wrote about on here before quite often, for example in the context of my name change, as I changed my name to Emilia at least partly because of Emily of New Moon. We aren’t totally alike of course – that would be scary – and also have a lot of differences, but still it’s such an unbelievably relatable character to me – and the whole series really, not just Emily herself – and has been over the years, it’s crazy!

What was such a book for you? Do you still identify equally strongly with the protagonist, or has it changed over the years? 🙂

Question of the day (20th June).

What’s your favourite author?

My answer:

My favourite Polish author is definitely Małgorzata Musierowicz, I’ve written about her loads of times on here, she’s an author of a lovely book series that I just love to pieces. And my favourite foreign author is Lucy Maud Montgomery. But I find “Anne Of Green Gables” slightly overrated. I do like her but she’s written so many other great books that are underappreciated because everyone sees only Anne who’s not as interesting as some other of her heroines like Emily Starr from “Emily Of New Moon” or Valancy Stirling from “The Blue Castle” for example. And I don’t like that people always think that her books are only for children. Well my Zofijka is a child, a tween, and she doesn’t even understand “Anne Of Green Gables”. I think with Montgomery’s books is a bit like with “The Moomins” or “Winnie The Pooh”, everyone associates them with children and reads them in childhood, but it’s only when you grow up that you start really understanding them and seeing them from a different angle.

How about your favourite author? 🙂

Question of the day (17th June).

What’s your favourite book?

My answer:

It’s hard to say because I like a lot of books, but I suppose my all time favourite is “Emily Of New Moon” by Lucy Maud Montgomery, the whole series. I identified myself a lot with Emily when I was a teen and there is still so much in this series that I can relate to and so many quotes I love, and it has helped me to look in a different way at so many things.

Yours? 🙂

Question of the day.

What are you currently reading?

My answer:

Recently apart from reading all the other stuff I like to refresh some Lucy Maud Montgomery’s book from time to time. But now I read them in the original versions. Montgomery’s books have a lot of different translations in Polish, and I’ve read all of those which I was able to get in any accessible format, many for a few times, but now I am reading her books in English. This time I decided for a collection of her short stories called “Along The Shore”, which has two titles in Polish, of which one can be translated as Scent Of The Wind, and the other as Traces In The Sand, so it sounds completely different. I often like to read books in different translations, and then in their original version if I can, and compare different details from each of these versions, sometimes you can notice really interesting or bizarre differences. Like if you’ve ever read “The Blue Castle”, you know that its main character’s name is Valancy. But in some old Polish old translation, I guess 1920’s or something, the translator decided he will rename her and he called her Joanna. I’d read another, much newer translation before where she was just Valancy, it was a very good translation and I loved the name Valancy, so, you know, with my name geekiness it was for me like I was reading about a completely different person, she wasn’t Valancy anymore, he was someone different. And also another character named Barney was renamed to Edward. I can somehow understand renaming Valancy to Joanna – her middle name was Jane, and Jane is Joanna in Polish, while there isn’t any equivalent for Valancy, and I guess people in 1920’s didn’t have that much of an idea about how to read English names – but, OMG, why Edward? 😀 It’s neither similar in sound to Barney, nor in feel, nor fits the character, so I couldn’t figure it out at all, the more that the name Barney doesn’t seem to be that complicated to read. And that translation was f***ed up overall, with large parts of text completely cut out and lots of weird stylistic errors. There is also a popular translation of “Emily Of New Moon”, not that bad, but with some errors as well, and one that particularly made me laugh was how the translator decided to describe one of Emily’s cats – a grey-eyed cat with ebony black eyes. 😀 I guess she had to be very sleepy while writing. 😛 So that’s to give you a little idea what such a translation, or mistranslation might look like at times. 😀

But, coming back to reading books in originals, first and foremost if you really like an author and if only you can read their books as they were originally written, it is in my opinion a much closer contact with what they really wanted to show you in their literature. Even the most accurate translation can’t express it fully since every language is so different and, first and foremost, everyone of us has a different style of writing, and everyone interprets things differently, so if you read something in its original version, you have the possibility of interpreting it more on your own and you don’t have to base on the translator’s interpretation of what the author wanted to say, even if it’s just a pretty universal ad easy to read shortstory. And, obviously, if you read books in their original versions, in languages that aren’t your mother tongues, the benefits for your linguistical development and your brains overall are significant.

And what are you reading? 🙂

Question of the day.

Make up your own question and answer it. You can also answer mine and I will answer yours if I can.

My question:

If you were cast away on a desert island, with only one book, apart from the Bible and Shakespeare, and one record, what would they be?

My answer:

Desert island, that sounds somewhat appealing. 😀 I’d have a hard time deciding, really. As a book… somehow I feel the one I would particularly like to take with me would be “Blue Castle” by Lucy Maud Montgomery. As for the record… hmmmm… mmmmmm……. that’s a dilemma………… well I’m gonna pick “Shepherd Moons” by Enya, I guess.

What would you take with yourself? What would your own question and answer will be? 🙂

My favourite “Pat Of Silver Bush” quotes.

So I thought I’d also share with you some of my favourite quotes from “Pat Of Silver Bush” series, also by Lucy Maud Montgomery. “Pat Of SIlver Bush” tells a story of Pat’s life. She is very deeply attached to her family home called Silver Bush, she just literally lives for it, and as one of her uncles said, Silver Bush was her religion. She loved her family deeply and hated any changes. And hated leaving Silver Bush. Since as you probably know I’ve spent almost my entire childhood at the boarding school and hated, I related to Pat a lot, almost as much as to Emily of New Moon. So here are some quotes.

“Don’t be fretting…about me marrying. Marrying’s a trouble and not marrying’s a trouble and I sticks to the trouble I knows.”

“If you believe in a thing it doesn’t matter whether it exists or not”

“No matter what dreadful things happened at least there were still cats in the world.”

“Oh, oh, it’s not meself that do be knowing what the girls of today are coming to. Trying to make thimselves into min and not succading very well at that.”

And here are some quotes from “Mistress Pat”:

“There might be some hours of loneliness. But there was something wonderful even in loneliness. At least you belonged to yourself when you were lonely.” —

“I don’t seem to be like other girls, Judy. They all want to go to college and have a career. I don’t…I just want to stay at Silver Bush and help you and mother. There’s work for me here, Judy…you know there is. Mother isn’t strong. As for being educated…I shall be well educated…love educates, Judy.”

“I’ve always thought nobody understood me quite as well as I understood myself.”

“I love keeping house…it’s really a lovely phrase isn’t it? Keeping it…holding it fast against the world…against all the forces trying to tear it open.”

“If one could only feel always like this,” Pat had said once to Judy. “All the little worries swallowed up…all the petty spites and fears and disappointments forgotten…just love and peace and beauty.”

“Oh, oh, but what wud there be lift for heaven, girl dear?” asked Judy.”

“These modern novels that leave everything unfinished annoy me…”

“But things are often unfinished in real life,” said Pat…

“All the more reason why they should come right in books,” said Uncle Horace testily. “Real life! We get enough real life living. I like fairy tales. I like a nice snug tidy ending in a book with all the loose ends tucked in.”

“They can laugh when things go wrong. I like that. Anyone can laugh when it’s all smooth sailing.”

“Everybody is a little insane on some points”

My favourite “Jane Of Lantern Hill” quotes.

I was rereading this book a few days ago for like a fourth time in my life I guess, and thought I’d share with you a few of my favourite quotes from this book. For those of you who have never heard of it, it’s written by Lucy Maud Montgomery. It tells the story of a girl called Jane, who lives with her mum and her grandmother in Toronto. She is mainly brought up by her stern and demanding grandma, because her mum, although very loving, caring and just wonderful, is afraid to opose and claims she should be grateful for her mother for things she did for her. Jane thinks her father died, but one year she’s told he’s still alive, and then she gets a letter from him and he invites her for holidays on Prince Edward Isle. And then the most interesting part of this book starts. So here are a few quotes. I usually don’t particularly search for quotes in books and don’t focus on them a lot, but since I’ve been rereading Montgomery’s books many times, I have my favourite quotes or even whole paragraphs in her books.

“It’s the fools that make all the trouble in the world, not the wicked.”

“Can I help you?” said Jane.

Though Jane herself had no inkling of it, those words were the keynote of her character. Any one else would probably have said, “What is the matter?” But Jane always wanted to help: and, though she was too young to realize it, the tragedy of her little existence was that nobody ever wanted her help.”

“Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.” The most terrible and tremendous saying in the world, Jane… because we are all afraid of truth and afraid of freedom… that’s why we murdered Jesus.”

Question of the day.

What is the worst book to movie adaptation you’ve ever seen and which movie was much better than the book?

My answer:

Don’t have much to say here really, at least not about movie to book adaptations. But as for book to movie, I’ll pick “Emily From New Moon”, because the movie is gross. There are some weird sexual scenes or allusions, which you WON’t find in the book at all, and generally, being a huge fan of both “Emily…” and Lucy Maud Montgomery’s other works, I felt like this movie was pretty much ripped of that moving beauty the book has. Just very crappy.

Which book and movie would you pick?