Elin Teilus – “Nils Henriks Jojk” (Nils Henrik’s Joik).

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Yeah, time for some more Sámi joik. Elin Teilus is a Sámi singer from Sweden whom I’ve discovered relatively recently, about last month, I guess. She has roots both in Udtja in the Swedish part of Sápmi as well as in Gothenburg. This song is a very traditional joik in that it has no lyrics, and, as its title suggests, it is dedicated to a person, as a lot of joiks are, more exactly to Elin’s relative – Nils Henrik Teilus – about whom she writes a bit in the description of the below video. I’ve already written how I really like it about joik that people can have their own joiks reflect those about/for whom they are, and this one sounds deeply personal as well. 

Marit Susanne Utsi – “Vuolgu Olggos”.

   Hi guys! 🙂 

   For today I have a Sámi song for you. I’ve heard it a couple weeks ago in NRK Sápmi which is the Norwegian Sámi radio station, and I really liked it right away. Sadly, I don’t know anything about the singer, not even where in Sápmii she lives – Norway, Sweden or Finland. – Since I don’t speak Sámi (yet) myself, I also don’t know what the title of this song means exactly, but I was able to find out that olggos means outside, and while I don’t know what vuolgu means specifically, it appears to be a form of the verb vuolgit which means to leave or to depart. 

 

  Marit Susanne Utsi – “Vuolgu Olggos”.

Ellen A. Oskal, Frode Barth, Manu Katché, Palle Mikkelborg & Trygvee Seim – “Sara Helena Bergström Skal”.

   I have mentioned it several times on here how one of the things that I like most about the Sámi joik is how very well it blends with all sorts of contemporary genres, better than any other type of folk music that I’m familiar with. ANd I’ve shared with you guys songs that blend joik together with such genres as electronic music, pop, hip-hop or bluegrass. Today it’s time for a fusion of joik with jazz. 

   This joik tune comes from an album called Árbi, which means heritage in Sámi, the result of a collaboration between Sámi singer Ellen A. Oskal and jazz musician, composer and guitarist Frode Barth, featuring various other jazz musicians. It includes joiks of various people, who I believe must be Ellen A. Oskal’s ancestors or family. Despite I’m not really a fan of jazz, I do like this album. This particular piece, as you can figure out from the title, is the joik of someone called Sara Helena Bergstrøm Oskal, and it also features  French drummer Manu Katché, Danish trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg, and Norwegian saxophone player Trygve Seim. 

Alexander Rybak – “Let the Music Guide You”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Continuing the recent Sámi theme on my blog, I thought I’d share with you one more song which is not Sámi, but inspired by joik and with joik influences, from the Belarussian-born Norwegian singer Alexander Rybak, best known (at least to Europeans) for winning the Eurovision Song Contest in 2009 with his song Fairytale, and for playing the violin. Some of my readers might also remember that he is Sofi’s childhood crush, who, as it happens, was introduced to her by a certain Bibiel, who was totally unaware what sort of results it will have and that the whole household will end up having to listen to his “Oah” on repeat for two weeks, and whom she still listens to a lot and has a strong sentiment for. I definitely don’t like all of his music, but some of his songs are really good, and I have already shared three other songs by him on here, one children’s song sung in Norwegian called Dyrene i Afrika (The ANimals in Africa),  which is so easy that I had managed to translate it even though I wasn’t learning Norwegian then yet, then a cover of a Swedish song by Mats Paulson called Visa vid Vindens ängar (Song at the Wind’s Meadows), and the third one a song in English by another ESC contestant from Romania – Roxen – called Wonderland in which he plays the violin. I think this one is really nice and I like the Sámi influence in it. 

Jarŋŋa – “Äno Jiedna” (Voice of the River).

   Hey people! 🙂 

   As I said yesterday when sharing a song by the Swedish Sámi singer Katarina Rimpi, I was thinking about sharing a song by her band Jarŋŋa at some point, and I figured that since I’ve been sharing quite a lot of Sámi music lately anyway so why not do it right away. Jarŋŋa is the Sámi word for the widest part of a lake, and this band consists of the aforementioned Katarina Rimpi, as well as another singer called Mandy Senger. This is my favourite joik tune by them. 

Katarina Rimpi – “Julevädno” (Lule River”

   Hiya people! 🙂 

   How do you feel about yet another Sámi joik, this time from Sweden? 

   Katarina Rimpi was one of the first Swedish Sámi artists that I’ve discovered when I was first introduced to Sámi music in general, and I’ve really liked her right away. But then at some point I sort of forgot about her music and hadn’t been listening to it for a long time, until I was reminded of it recently and was happy to sort of rediscover it. 

   Katarina Rimpi is from Jokkmokk in Luleå in Sweden, and is a very versatile person, as she is not only a singer and joiker but also a painter and a craftswoman, and has a degree in technical physics. Her music is inspired by Arctic landscapes. She has also founded a band called Jarŋŋa which means the widest part of a lake in Luleå Sami, together with another singer called Mandy Senger. I am also planning on sharing with you one song by Jarŋŋa with Katarina Rimpi as the vocalist. She must clearly have a close affinity with lakes, rivers, and perhaps other bodies of water as well, since this song is about a river (Julevädno is the Sámi name of the Lule river), her band’s name has to do with a lake, and the song I plan on sharing with you from Jarŋŋa’s repertoire is alsoo about a river. Funnily enough, for the longest time I used to think that this is a Christmas song, because it has “jul-“ in it and jul means Christmas in Swedish so my brain jumped to that conclusion without even thinking whether the Sámi word for Christmas is anŧ similar. 😀 

   Below is the translation of this song. 

   The river flows, whispers to me
Julevädno speaks to my heart
Voice of the river leads me
Julevädno touches my soul
The well lies far up west
Pours water into the river day by day
The water of this river is sacred to me
This river valley the place I want to be

Clear water like silver
Rushing with force through all times
The soul of the river whispers to me
Julevädno I love and honour you
Nothing takes the soul of that river
The clear silver water
As long as the water flows
And the rushing sound of streaming water
Can be heard
There will be hope and comfort in our lives

 

Elen Marianne Utsi, Piera Eira & Bernt Mikkel Haglund – “Movttegis Nieiddat”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   I think I have already mentioned how I think that of all the peoples speaking my favourite languages, the Sámi seem to be most fond of mixing folk music (in their case of course joiking in particular) with more modern genres, from electronic, to pop, to hip-hop, all sorts of things really. Perhaps it’s because it seems so obvious that when you sing in Sámi, it’s almost impossible not to include joiking, so naturally it comes out sounding a lot more folky than it would be otherwise. But I also think that joik blends extremely well with modern genres, better than many other kinds of folk music do, so they may just be very aware of it and take full advantage of it. I find blending folk music with modern genres or modern instrumentation very interesting in general, even if I don’t always like the results. I feel like it either comes out very good and tasteful, or the complete opposite and on the kitschy side. With Sámi music, more often than not, it’s the former. 

   So since I’ve been listening to all sorts of music in Sámi lately, I thought I’d share with you one such song which blends together Sámi folk and pop/dance vibes into a quite surprisingly coherent-sounding whole. I don’t really know much about these three musicians behind it other than they’re all from Kautokeino in Finnmark in Norway. I don’t even know what the title of this piece means, other than that I believe nieiddat means daughters but I’m not even entirely sure of that. 

Elin Kåven – “Javkan” (Vanished”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

 

   I’ve been listening a fair bit to Elin Kåven lately, as well as to Elin & The Woods which is a more electronic-sounding band which she has formed together with Robin Lynch, and I thought I’d share something by her withh you. Elin is from Karasjok in Norway, and from what I’ve read she also has her faithful fans in European countries outside of Scandinavia, and she’s  known as The Arctic Fairy among them. She defines her music as arctic folk pop, which is a very fitting description indeed and I really like how she blends joiking and Sámi folk in general with a more pop sound. This song by hers is called Javkan, or Vanished in English, and, surprisingly, I’ve even managed to find an English translation of it, though I have no idea how reliable it actually is, but it’s the only one I’ve found and you can see it here. 

Sofia Jannok – “ViviAnn”.

   Hiya people! 🙂 

   Today I’d like to share with you a Sámi song, from an incredibly talented Swedish Sámi artist which is Sofia Jannok. I think Sofia is also one of the most influential Sámi musicians and one of the better known outside of Sámi land. I first came across her music thanks to Last.fm, which was my main source of music discoveries at the time and which generally introduced Sámi music to me, a bit accidentally, which I already wrote a little about when sharing Ulla Pirttijärvi’s song last month. Sofia seems like a fierce and powerful woman with very concrete views on the world, which don’t overlap with mine nearly at all at least from what I know and have noticed, but I still love her music very much and admire her love for her land. She has a great voice and I love how she blends so many different music styles, and how all these different styles all blend very well with her joiking. Unfortunately, despite I’ve been familiar with ViviAnn for years, I have no idea what it is about. Aside from joiking, it has lyrics in Sámi, but I’ve never seen any translations and have no clue what it could be about or who ViviAnn is. It makes me think of our Zofijka, because Vivi is a Finnish diminutive of Sofia/Sohvi, and I sometimes even call her Vivi, and Ann is obviously a variant of Anna, and Sofi’s middle name is Anna. 

Maxida Märak – “Jåhkåmåhkke”.

   Hiya people! 🙂 

   Yesterday (February 6) was Sámi people’s National Day. I love a lot of Sámi music that I know, but because I don’t know and don’t share as much of it as I do, say,Swedish or Welsh, I like to celebrate this day in some way on my blog and so it’s been a bit of a tradition that I’ve been sharing something Sámi at this time of the year. I heard this song a few months ago in one of the Sámi radio stations, don’t remember whether the Swedish or Norwegian one, and I really liked it. I once shared one song by Maxida Märak before, but that one was quite vastly different as it was in collaboration with Downhill Bluegrass Band, whereas most of her music that she’s known for is actually rap or electronic plus often joiking of course, so I’d say this song is more her usual style though it’s pure joiking with no lyrics. 

   Jåhkåmåhkke is a place in Sápmi, this is its Lule Sámi name as far as I’m aware, it’s also known as Jokkmokk in Swedish and Jokimukka in Finnish. It means river’s curve in Lule Sámi. It’s a very important location for Sámi people, as that’s where an office of the Sámi Parliament is, as well as Sámi Education Centre, and every year, on the first Thursday of February there’s Jokkmokk market, which is one of the most important social events for the Sámi culture. 

Úlla Pirttijärvi – “Gietkka” (Cradle).

Hi hi people! 🙂 

   Even though I generally really like Sámi music very much, there hasn’t been much of it that I’ve shared with you guys on here. Moreover, I think I haven’t ever shared any Sámi music from Finland on here, so it’s time to do it now. Ulla Pirttijärvi was actually the very first Sámi singer that I came across. I had just fallen in love with Finnish language, and wanted to look up some Finnish folk on Last.fm, and Ulla Pirttijärvi’s music was the first thing that Last.fm decided to show me and, while technically it wasn’t exactly what I was looking for, because when I went looking for Finnish folk I was thinking, you know, Finnish-language, “actual” Finnish folk, I loved her music straight away because it was so different from anything I’d ever heard before and really beautiful. I didn’t even know that it wasn’t the “actual” Finnish music. I mean, I could hear that this didn’t quite sound like the Finnish language I was accustomed to hearing so far, , I knew that Finnish doesn’t even really have letters like “g” or “b” which I could hear in her language, but, who knows, maybe they have such distinctive dialects, or something? I didn’t have a clue about such a thing as joiking at the time either. I don’t know when exactly it was that I ended up actually learning about Sámi music and culture and what joiking is and that it’s a separate thing from Finnish, but for sure when it comes to my love for the Sámi language and interest in Sámi music, at least some of the credit for sparking that in me must go to Ulla Pirttijärvi. 

   And this song is one of my favourite songs by her. I must say that I am not sure what its actual title is. Spotify says “Boares Gietkka/Lullaby” other places say just “Gietkka”. What I’m quite sure of is that gietkka likely means cradle. I’ve even found a 

translation 

For this song, although I have absolutely no idea how reliable it is. 

  The cradle had been left in the shed
The old cradle
in the corner of the shed, swaying in the wind
and hummed bedtime songs to it
 
Rocking babies a long time ago
To sleep

 

Cezinando – “Håper Du Har Plass” (Hope You Have Space” & ISÁK “Sávan Dus Lea Sadji”.

Hiya people! 🙂

I’ve been familiar for years with the song I want to share with you today, and I’d known it’s a cover of something, but had no idea of what. You may recognise ISÁK if you’ve been reading my blog from the early days because I shared one song of hers – “Face The Truth” – back then. She’s still one of my favourite Sami pop artists, and Sávan Dus Lea Sadji was one of her earlier songs as far as I can recall.

So recently I was listening to some Norwegian music on Spotify and heard “Håper Du Har Plass” by Cezinando that sounded oddly familiar and for a while I couldn’t quite recall what it reminded me of, but eventually figured it out that it sounds just like the ISÁK song, except it was obviously in Norwegian rather than Sámi, and indeed, that is the song which ISÁK covered. Now I like both versions a lot.

Cezinando is Kristoffer Cezinando Karlsen, he is a rapper, singer and songwriter who’s music has been highly acclaimed in Norway, and he lives in Oslo and is of both Norwegian as well as Portuguese descent.

 

ISÁK is actually a band, but I believe its founder and frontwoman- Ella Marie Hætta Isaksen- also uses it as her own artist name. She won a Norwegian song competition Stjernekamp in 2018, and I believe she is now more recogniseable in the mainstreamy world (or at least the more mainstreamy Norwegian world) due to her collabing with Alan Walker.

I managed to do a translation of the Cezinando version, which I’ll share below. This time, since he’s from Oslo, it’s not nynorsk 😌 ) but some bits were still challenging for me for various reasons. Sometimes I knew what something meant in Norwegian but found it difficult to find the right English words that would work in something as concise as lyrics but also convey the sense as well as I’d like. Some bits I could understand literally but wasn’t sure what exactly they’re supposed to mean or whether they’re idioms or whether I was in fact understanding something wrong, to the point that in a few places it seemed rather nonsensical like that line with the cellar. :O

There’s nothing that interests me anymore

Or feel like a genuine feeling

And it has just started to pour down

So I hope you have space

I hope you have space for me, again

Could be just a matress that can lie in the toilet as far as I am concerned

I hope I get a pass into your palace

I can keep calm and sneak around as if I was walking on glass

I hope there is space somewhere inside the heart that you’ve inherited from your mother and me

I hope you have space, I hope you have space

I come all alone and with no pass

You can tell me when I need to pay attention and put me in my place if you find a window for me

Oh, catch me when I fall or lose myself, and the last flame or spark

I will let you cry yourself out for a life with me on my cost if you find a window for me

I’m coming back home

[…] was home again

I cannot go to her again

It is my fault that it has ended

So she has things that boil down in the cellar that burnt the home [???]

And I have things in the closet and in the folder [?]

I let it ring two times before I hung up so you can call me back up, and I will see your name on the screen – with a picture – of you

I hope you have space, I hope you have space

You can tell me when I need to pay attention and put me in my place if you find a window for me

Oh, catch me when I fall or lose myself and the last flame or spark

I will let you cry yourself out for a life with me on my cost if you find a window for me

I come all alone and with no pass

I have slept out before

Then I was closer to the real me

The one far from the perfect, little defective me

I thought it was Jesus when you woke me up, but I’m easily fooled

The whole life and the whole world has been on me

So I gave up trying to make them understand me

I can make dinner, its the same for me

What about frozen hash?

I hope you have space, I hope you have space

I come all alone and with no pass

You can tell me when I need to pay attention and put me in my place if you find a window for me

Oh, catch me when I fall or lose myself and the last flame or spark

I will let you cry yourself out for a life with me on my cost if you find a window for me

There’s nothing that interests me anymore

Or feel like a genuine feeling

And it has just started to pour down

So I hope you have space

I hope you have space for me

Again, again, again, again

Every time I’ve wanted to come back home to you

I wasn’t expecting to be able to find a translation of ISÁK’s version, but, surprisingly, I did, and as far as I can tell as a practical non-Sámi speaker (yet) it seems fairly decent. You can find it

here.

My nature has changed, crushed

And it feels no more

It is fitting that it has began to rain again now

I hope you have

Hope you have

Space for me

I don’t ask for much

I could even

Go sleep on the floor

Then I wish that I could

Get away from this pain because

Nothing feels okay

I wish you have space somewhere

In your heart that you got from your mother and me

I hope you have space

Space for me

I am all alone now

Nothing matters

I promise to obey and be good

If you would let me in

Oh, save me when I hurry

Or lose myself

When the last lights have died out

You can cry in my arms

Give me the burden

If you would let me in

I return home again now

Most unfair in the world

How they don’t find peace anymore

When they know who is guilty

And then look for ways that

Must kill the sorrow

But my ownership is in their house

Because of that I don’t have strength to quit

Knocking their door

Even though each wound shouts not to tease

I need you

I hope you have

Space for me

I am all alone now

Nothing matters

I promise to obey and be good

If you would let me in

Oh, save me when I hurry

Or lose myself

When the last lights have died out

You can cry in my arms

Give me the burden

If you would let me in

I hope you have

Space for me

I am all alone now

Nothing matters

I promise to obey and be good

If you would let me in

Oh, save me when I hurry

Or lose myself

When the last lights have died out

You can cry in my arms

Give me the burden

If you would let me in

I hope you have

Space for me

I am all alone now

Nothing matters

I promise to obey and be good

If you would let me in

Oh, save me when I hurry

Or lose myself

When the last lights have died out

You can cry in my arms

Give me the burden

If you would let me in

Cezinando:

ISÁK:

Resirkulert – “Áddjá” (Grandfather”.

Hey guys! 🙂

Time for a song in Sami! I guess I didn’t share one on the Sami national day (February 6) so it’s really long overdue, but until now, I didn’t really have any specific ideas what Sami song I could share with you. I’ve known this one for quite some time but came across it recently in my music collection and thought it would be a good fit.

Resirkulert (which translates to Recycled in English) isn’t really a Sami band, in that, as far as I know, they have no other songs recorded in that language and most of the members are not Sami. They seem to be quite popular on the Norwegian music scene, although, while I listen to a lot of Norwegian music I don’t have a very good idea what’s actually popular with Norwegians and what’s not really because I don’t really know the language, only via Swedish, don’t listen to Norwegian radio stations and don’t know many Norwegian people. Still, Resirkulert seems like a fairly well-established band in their home country. They come from the very north of Norway, and only one of their members – the vocalist, Emil Karlsen – actually is Sami. This joik (a piece of traditional Sami music, usually with little to no lyrics, dedicated to, or should we rather say extremely closely associated or expressing the essence of, a person, an animal etc.) is Emil Karlsen’s grandfather’s joik. I find it so interesting that, from what I gather, it’s like Sami people each have their own joik which somehow describes them and who they are and is like an essential part of their identity, it’s so interesting to have a specific tune so strongly incorporated in yourself, that other people can’t sing to you (apparently it’s not the thing to sing it yourself, I guess it would be a bit egotistical). It’s quite abstractive but also very appealing to me, probably partly because of its abstractivity. 😀 What I also like about joiks is that they, despite being such an old singing tradition, can go extremely well with modern instrumentation and generally our contemporary music genres, which you could have already noticed from a few Sami songs I’ve shared before. I mean, obviously there’s loads of neofolk, electrofolk, folk pop and what not from around the world and it often sounds just as good as traditional folk, but something really clicks between joik and contemporary music vibes.

A fun fact I once learned is that Áddjá, while it generally means grandfather, can also relate to any older/elderly adult with whom you have a friendly relationship and who perhaps shares his wisdom with you or something like that. Moreover, Áddjá is apparently also used in the Sami land in reference to a BEAR! So I guess that shows what kind of relationship they have with bears, traditionally. As someone who loved bears as a kid very much, I like the idea.

Katarina Barruk – “Evelina”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I have a song in Sami for you! Sami music is beautiful, and, although Sami languages are all endangered, they are cultivated anyway and music is being created in them as well as other kinds of art.

I’ve come across this particular singer very recently in Sveriges Radio Sápmi, where they played this song of hers. I really liked it immediately so that it’s now one of my Sami favourites. When I then wanted to learn something about Katarina Barruk, I believe it was from the comments under the videos with her songs on Youtube that led me to thinking that she must be Norwegian, because many of them were in Norwegian. However, today I learned that she is an Ume Sami speaker (there isn’t just one Sami language but multiple ones) and Ume Sami is apparently spoken only in Sweden these days, so she must be Swedish. Also, what’s very intriguing that I learned today is that apparently Ume Sami has only about TEN speakers! It’s very sad and depressing, but isn’t that so amazing that they make music even in such rare languages?! I find it really wonderful and exciting.

Mari Boine – “Gula Gula”.

This is a typical, classic example of a Sami joik, and I really like the feel of it! Sadly, again, I was unable to find a reliable translation. One that I found, but somehow don’t think it’s perfecty reliable, would indicate that the song is about the Earth, that it is our mother and that people need to go back to their roots and where they come from, and save the Earth from the pollution. And gula would mean listen.

 

Song of the day (28th September) – Herman Rundberg ft. Mari Boine – “Fillii Fillii”.

Hi guys! 🙂

I’d like to share with you a couple of songs by the sami singer from Norway – Mari Boine. – She is quite known in the folk music world, I’ve even heard about her quite a few times in Polish media, and she is surely the most widely known Sami musician. She not only does yoiks and typical Sami music, but she also blends it with other genres, like jazz, or pop. And this piece is quite an interesting mixture of electro/dance and folk. Sadly, Sami languages, even the most popular North Sami in which I assume Mari sings, is not widely known, hence the lack of an English translation online, and I can’t even tell you what Fillii Fillii is supposed to mean, I have no idea. I hope I will know some day. The song is cool though.

 

Kevin Boine – “Kom Till Finnmark”/”Boađe” (Come To Finnmark).

 

Ok guys so as you know from the previous post which I reblogged from Watching The Swedes today is national day of the Sami people. Not only in Sweden, to be exact, but as it seems also in all the other countries where Sami people are a recognised minority. So, I’d like to celebrate this fact with some music, and I was looking forward to it for quite a while as it hasn’t been much of Sami music on my blog so far, just a couple of songs. On my last blog, the song with which I celebrated the national day of Sami people was Sofia Jannok’s song called “My Land”, and for a moment I intended to share this one here too especially that Sofia iS Swedish, and I know a lot of her music and like it, even if I don’t agree with all of her views wholeheartedly but that’s not what music is all about so I don’t care. But earlier today I decided it’s time to make some new Sami music discoveries, and not only in folk music, joiks and such, but generally, all the music that has been made all over Lapland. ANd I found lots of interesting things, just now in the last couple of hours. So you can definitely say that Sami music is a rare, very locally oriented, niche thing, but you can’t say that there is little of it, there is a whole lot of it. Well certainly not as much as say American music, but there is a lot of it out there. And therefore I decided on something else, not from Sofia Jannok’s repertoire. I was thinking that maybe I should pick something more, hm, folksy, traditional, more joiking even, but after some more thinking I believe that this is the best choice I could make.

Kevin Boine is from the Norwegian part of Lapland and if I understood well what I read, he is from Finnmark himself. It didn’t escape my attention that he shares his surname with another Sami singer – a worldwide famous one who is even somewhat acclaimed here in Poland and has fans here – Mari Boine. Well it turns out that they are relatives just as I thought. Although Mari’s style is quite eclectic, it’s still rather different from Kevin’s, because his music is something between hiphop and dance, it seems to be very popular in Norway now, and he has made a few hits. Most of his music is in Norwegian, but he started off in a Norwegian singing competition with a rap in Sami.

As for this song, it has two versions as you can see, one is in Norwegian and another one is in Sami, and as far as I can tell knowing only very small bits and pieces of Norwegian and even smaller of Sami, they’re translations of each other. I picked this song because I think it’s really suitable in a way. One of the aims why I generally make this whole song of the day thing on my blog is that I want to share music that people might not be aware of even existing, like Sami music for example, I just want to spread the awareness that there is more than just the hits you can hear in every single mainstream radiostation across the world. And so my aim today is the same, to share with people that Sami people also have their own music and that it’s good, to promote it as much as I can in one post and on my blog that isn’t that very famous. 😀 And I feel like this song could be perfectly usable if someone was to make a commercial advertising Finnmark, wanting to promote it for the tourists, hahahaha. That was just my first association, it would do really well in this function! So I think it could be also used to promote the Sami culture a bit in general, on this special day of theirs. And it’s so catchy, a real earworm, or a brainworm as I like to say. I think it’s very likeable. ALso it’s cool that it has two versions, pity though that the Sami version seems to only be available on Spotify. SO here are the two versions of it.

Song of the day – Jon Henrik Fjällgren – “The Rein Herder’s Joik”.

This is such a beautiful joik. If there are some people who don’t know what joik is, it’s such a way of singing, and a type of song, which is traditional for Lappland and Sami culture. I guess that since I first heard Jon Henrik Fjälgren’s joiking he is one of my most favourite Sami singers, be them joiking or not joiking, traditional or not, there aren’t many Sami singers whatsoever, or at least not very many that I know of. I think his joiks are particularly moving. But this one is my absolute favourite by him, I don’t even know why, but it’s just so stunningly beautiful! Isn’t it?!

And as for Fjällgren, his story is also very interesting. He was born i Cali in Colombia, lived in an Indian village for some time, and was moved to an orphanage from there. Later he was adopted by a Sami family from Sweden and lived with them in Mittodalen. He came to prominence when he took part in a Swedish talent competition in 2014. He also took part last year in Melodifestivalen (which is a Swedish contest during which the singer who will represent the country on Eurovision is selected) in 2017, with Aninia, and I will show you the song they sang together in another post. That’s what I know about him from both English

and Swedish

Wikipedia. So here’s the joik. 🙂

IsÁk – “Face The Truth”.

Hi guys. 🙂

Recently, I’ve showed you a lot of Scandinavian – Swedish and Norwegian – music, often some pretty new things. Let’s stay in Scandinavia, but have something slightly more exotic today.

IsÁk is a Sami band – from Norwegian Lapland – and they combine Sami joik – Sami traditional singing technique, joik is also a name of song sung in such a style and generally this genre – with modern, kinda synth sounds. Their lyrics, so far, as they don’t have any full length album as of yet, are in English, Norwegian or Sami. The band has gained quite a lot of attention in the Sami environment and on the modern Sami music scene.

The name of the name of the band, as I assume, comes from the leader and vocalist’s surname, she is ELla Marie Hætta Isaksen.

As far as I know, they only have a few songs released until now, and I must say that I generally quite like them but I find this song the best, I feel like the rest isn’t as good as this one, even this song is for the most part in English. Though as you will be able to hear, there is also a part in Sami, and with joik too. So here it is and I hope you’ll like it too.