Aine Minogue – All About Eve.

Hi guys! ๐Ÿ™‚

Aine Minogue is my most favourite harpist in the whole world and one of my most favourite female singers. She’s so soothing. I’ve already showed you one of her instrumental pieces called “Brigid’s Feast”. If anyone of you like Enya, I’m sure you’ll love Aine, if you don’t know her yet. I can say that her music has pulled me through a lot for many years, it always gives me what I need the most. It soothes me, helps me escape from the reality, or gives me the space to think more on things, elevates my mood or keeps me company when I’m depressed, helps me overcome or let out my feelings, inspires me or helps my mind to clear itself from all thoughts. Her voice is so ethereal and beautiful and so is her accent, and I absolutely love her harp. When I’m in the mood, I can listen to her for hours, and so I do today.

The song I want to show you comes from aine’s newest album called “Eve”. It’s inspired by Eve as an archetype of femininity, or biblical Eve, or whoever/whatever she can be for AIne and for us. The song itself is particularly inspired by the movie “All About Eve”.

As for Aine, she comes from Ireland, from co. Tipperary, but now she lives in New England.

Catrin Finch ft. Seckou Keita – “Clarach”.

Hi guys! ๐Ÿ™‚

Today I have an instrumental for you. Something extremely powerful, brilliant and charismatic.

I love Catrin Finch. It’s pretty easy to guess if you know that Finch is a harpist, because I love harp, any kind of harp, and I love Welsh music, and you can find plenty of Welsh inspirations in her music, because she lives in Wales. Catrin Finch is a really good and widely known harpist, just the fact that the first time I’ve heard about her was in Polish public radio, not in Welsh BBC station or online. And I naturally liked her music immediately. She’s a really good and skilled harpist and arranger. She was taught by very good harpists, like Elinor Bennett (who is actually her mother in law now) and started to learn to play harp at quite an early age, don’t know now when exactly, but as a child. Her mum is German, and her dad is English, but she is a fluent Welsh-speaker. She and her husband own a studio near Cardiff, which is actually an old chapel, and lots of great artists recorded their music there.

The piece I want to show you – “Clarach” – is a collaboration between Finch and Seckou Keita. Seckou Keita is from Senegal and he plays kora (have you ever heard about this instrument? I haven’t) and is also a drummer. Clarach, if you don’t know and are curious, is the name of te river near Aberystwyth in Wales.

Track of the day (1st February) – Aine Minogue – Brigid’s Feast.

So, did I ever mention on here before how crazy I am about harp? Well, Celtic harp mainly, but also harp in general. I think I didn’t do it, so I do now. I really really love harp. Welsh triple harp, Irish Celtic harp, classical harp and even autoharp and other kinds of harps. Well I probably haven’t heard them all, but all of these I’ve heard, I love, or at least like.

So today I come to you with a piece from the repertoire of Aine Minogue – who is an Irish Celtic harpist, currently living in the US. She is also singing frequently on her albums, her music is extremely soothing, dream-like, but her voice is also very soothing and unique so her harp, voice and other instruments make a really great mix. I sometimes just can’t stop listen to her.

this is an instrumental. I chose it firstly because it’s just so beautiful, so much of harp, such beautiful, but simple harmonies, etc. but also because of the fact that it is a perfect track for yesterday. That’s why I am so sorry I didn’t manage to show you it on time.

Yesterday, besides the fact that it was my birthday, ๐Ÿ˜€ it was also the feast day of saint Bridget of Kildare, who is an Irish saint, but centuries ago, Celts honoured one of their goddesses, Brigid, on this day. Actually, some people say that Brigid and saint Bridgt are one and the same person, just that the firstย  evolved in the latter in people’s minds when Catholicism started to dominate Celtic beliefs. Brigid’s feast day was also called Imbolc and marked the beginning of spring.

Brigid was the goddess of the hearth, poetry, healing, childbirth and unity.

OK, so here’s this stunning piece of Aine’s music: