The various forms of Daphne and Laura (and other laurel names)

Which laurel names out of these are your favourite, guys? 🙂
I didn’t even know Daphne had so many forms, other than Daphne and Dafne, which apart from Italy can be also used in Poland, well it’s used extremely rarely but still is and of course it’s used in reference to the nymph as well. I’m not crazy about Daphne, but I like it.
I like Laura too. I used to like it far more in the past but now as it’s so popular here in Poland I am not as fond of it as I used to be, but it’s still a beautiful, slightly mysterious sounding name with cool and smooth charm to it. Though I much prefer it pronounced our way, LAH-oo-rah, rather than like Lora. I think Lauretta and Laurette are lovely. I also like Laurel itself. And Welsh Lowri is cute.
I haven’t heard about Kelila before but it looks very interesting.

Onomastics Outside the Box

Pauline as Daphne Fleeing from Apollo, ca. 1810, Robert Lefèvre

Daphne is a naiad in Greek mythology, a female nymph presiding over bodies of water such as lakes, fountains, springs, and brooks. She’s variously cited as the daughter of river god Peneus (Peneios) and nymph Creusa, or Ladon and Gaia.

Versions of Daphne’s story vary, but they all have the crux of Apollo falling in unrequited love with her after a curse from Eros (Cupid). As Apollo chased her, Daphne begged her father to save her, and she was turned into a laurel tree in the nick of time. Laurels thus became sacred to Apollo.

Daphne is also used in English and Dutch. The variation Daphné is French. Other forms include:

1. Daphnée is French.

2. Dafni is modern Greek.

3. Dafina is Macedonian and Albanian.

4. Dafne is Italian.

5. Daffni is Welsh.

6. Dapine is Georgian.

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Leonine names

I think these are all brilliant names to consider for a baby born in the star sign of Leo. 🙂

Onomastics Outside the Box

Pope Leo XIII (1810–1903), painted by Philip de László (né Fülöp Elek László)

Leo, which means “lion” in Latin, is English, German, Dutch, Scandinavian, Finnish, and Croatian, and currently enjoying great popularity. In 2017, it was #61 in the U.S. (and has been jumping up the charts since 2000), after having been a Top 100 staple from 1880–1937. Its highest rank was #37 in 1903.

It’s #1 in Australia, Canada, and Finland; #7 in England and Wales (and in France as Léo); #11 in Spain, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Sweden, and Catalonia; #19 in Switzerland (and #96 as Léo); #9 in Scotland; #8 in Galicia; #33 in Ireland; #22 in Austria; #58 in Norway; #91 in Belgium; and #71 in Slovenia.

As abovementioned, Léo is French. Another alternate form, Leó, is Icelandic and Hungarian.

French artist Léon Augustin Lhermitte, 1844–1925

Leon, which means “lion” in…

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Names ending in Z

I am generally rather neutral as for the letter Z in names, but I definitely love some names containing it, because it makes them sound crispy and ZZZippy. And lots of these ending in z have a particular, sort of exotic feel to me which is nice. I always loved Spanish Luz, I think it’s really full of ight in how it sounds, I don’t know maybe it’s my synaesthesia or autosuggestion but that’s how it feels to me, and there are lots of masculine names that I liked more or less in this post, but I guess I’d pick Luiz as my most favourite, especially that it is a masculine form of one of my all time favourite Polish feminine names, which is Luiza, since Luiza, apart from being a Portuguese name, is also Polish and Romanian.
Which ones are your favourite? Do you like names ending in Z? 🙂

Onomastics Outside the Box

I love names with the letter Z, whether they begin with a Z, have a Z in place of S (e.g., Izabella, Zofia, Jozef, Izydor), or end in Z. Many names ending in Z are of Spanish, Persian, modern Hebrew, and Arabic origin, but some come from other languages. I’m not including Hebrew names ending in TZ or Polish names ending in SZ, since those are their own letters/sounds.

Unisex:

Shahnaz means “pride of the king” in Persian. This name is also used in Urdu and Arabic. The Turkish, exclusively feminine, form is Şahnaz.

Paz means “gold” in Hebrew. This is an entirely separate name from the Spanish Paz.

Cruz means “cross” in Spanish and Portuguese.

Female:

Aliz is the Hungarian form of Alice. This name can also be rendered as Alíz.

Beatriz is Spanish and Portuguese.

Fairuz, or Fayruz, means “turquoise” in Arabic.

Inez

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The many forms of Philip (and other horsey names)

I love horses! And I love quite a few of these intriguing horsy names.
I’ve always loved Filip – as the Polish form of Phillip – so much so that it was for years on my list of names for a potential baby boy, very high on it to be honest. But, although my love hasn’t lessened, if I had a child nowadays, I am not so sure anymore I’d call him Filip, it’s so crazily popular over here nowadays.
I can see that Phillip in the US feels outdated and “geriatric” indeed, but Polish Filip isn’t like this at all. It’s flourishing, incredibly popular, feels youthful, maybe even childish, very charming and lively, but also gentle. And because I love Filip I like Philip too. And Felipe, and Pilip (Pilip is also an archaic Polish form, quite funny sounding in my opinion).
Piripi is also very funny, when I came across it for the first time a couple years ago, I thought it sounded like piri piri peppers. 😀
And I really like Felipa, and Filipina is cool, as a little girl I had a doll named Filipina, people were always amazed hearing her name haha.
From other names in this post, I particularly love Jorunn, I used it in one of my short stories for a Viking woman, and Rosalind – so cute and vintage.
OK, so that’s enough from me, I really encourage you guys to read this post and I’m curious which names of these are your favourite, let me know or come over to Carrie-Anne and tell her in the comments. 🙂

Onomastics Outside the Box

Philip the Apostle, by Peter Paul Rubens

In spite of being considered somewhat outdated or geriatric these days, I’ve always quite liked the name Philip. It’s a solid classic that could use a comeback. Perhaps my positive opinion was influenced by having two friends named Philip in junior high, both of them great guys.

Philip means “friend/lover of horses,” from Greek philos (lover, friend) and hippos (horse). One of the Twelve Apostles, Philip was originally much more popular among Eastern Christians. In the Middle Ages, it became more common in the West.

Philip sank in popularity in the Anglophone world in the 17th century, thanks to King Felipe II of Spain launching the Armada against England. It became popular again in the 19th century.

Infante Felipe of Spain, Duke of Parma (1720–1765), by Louis-Michel van Loo

The one-L spelling was in the U.S. Top 100 from 1880–1971, and again from 1973–88…

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