Floraleda Sacchi – “A Model of the Universe”.

Hey people! 🙂 

 

Today, I’d like to share with you this short piece played by Italian harpist Floraleda Sacchi, written by Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson. He created music for all kinds of media, and this composition is part of the soundtrack to the famous film about Stephen Hawking, The Theory of Everything (which by the way is one of our Sofi’s favourite movies). 

 

Floraleda Sacchi – “Gymnopedie, pt. III”.

Hey people! 🙂 

 

For today, I decided to share with you the third of Erik Satie’s Gymnopedies performed by Italian harpist Floraleda Sacchi. I have shared Gymnopedie I and III played by her before. I have also shared this particular Gymnopedie played by Welsh harpist Delyth Jenkins/Evans, and shared more about my relationship with Gymnopedies in that post. 

 

Floraleda Sacchi – “Divenire” (To Become).

   And for today, I chose a very interesting contemporary classical piece composed by pianist Ludovico Einaudi, originally coming from his album of the same title, and here played on the harp by Floraleda Sacchi, many of whose other interpretations of Einaudi’s compositions I’ve shared on here before. 

Floraleda Sacchi – “Gymnopedie, pt. 2”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   Today, let’s listen to one of Eric Satie’s Gymnopedies – namely the second, sad one. – It’s played on the harp by the Italian harpist Floraleda Sacchi who is already well-known on this mishmash blog for her musical versatility. I have shared the other two Gymnopedies in the past as well, the first one also by Sacchi, and the third by Delyth Evans/Jenkins   on the Celtic harp, so you can have a listen to those as well if you haven’t yet and read more about my feelings around Gymnopedies there. 

Floraleda Sacchi – “Inside the Tree”.

   Hi guys! 🙂 

   For today I’d like to share with you a LOONG, very interesting piece played by Floraleda Sacchi – an Italian harpist whose music I’ve shared quite a few times before on here already. – As is often the case with the music that she performs, this is quite an experimental piece, coming from her 2020 album of the same name. All the tracks on this album, including this one, are her harp arrangements of works of the Slovak composer Peter Machajdik. She’s accompanied by Piero Salvatori on the cello. I really like this piece because of how evocative it is and how it presents really vivid imageries in my mind. I first listened to this piece when I was sick last year, and had a little bit of a fever, which could have likely contributed to my imagination being a little more unhinged than usual, and I think I was actually in some sort of half-sleep while hearing it. As I was listening to this piece, my mind came up with some sort of tree people, who lived inside a huge, old pine tree, like a whole nation of people crammed into the space inside the tree. I could hear the narrative of their story in that weird half-sleep state I was in, as if it was a book or a documentary or something. I don’t remember everything that I imagined then, but I know and remember most vividly that they had conflicts all the time and were fighting each other and had wars and battles nearly all the Time. They didn’t need much to start arguing about something, and the smallest argument could end up violently. And a lot of those tree people died in such battles. Apparently that was their way of reducing the population so that they could have more space inside that tree. 😀 And they had a lot of orphaned children left after each such battle and they were crying for their parents. There were also wounded people lying around. One time finally it looked like they’ve killed each other, and there was just one huge bloody mess in there, but then it turned out that one little peep was still alive, except he lost his limbs in battle. He must have lost consciousness and then woke up all surprised and like: ‘Oh wow, I’m still alive!” And from then on he lived in that tree peacefully as a hermit. Probably because he wouldn’t be able to get out with no limbs. 😀 I really like music which works with my imagination like that and that makes my brain create things, even if they’re weird and, as in this case, don’t make much sense. And I’ve already said many times on here how I love long pieces of harp music, so there’s plenty of reasons for me to like this one, as you see. I’m curious if other people also have any sort of vivid imagery like that when listening to it, and if so, what is it? 

Floraleda Sacchi – “Gymnopedie I”.

   Hey people! 🙂 

   I’ve already written a bit about my relationship with Eric Satie’s Gymnopedies and shared the third one of them played on Celtic harp by Delyth Jenkins in this post, and today I thought I’d share the first Gymnopedie, but this time performed by the Italian harpist Floraleda Sacchi, who is more of a classically trained harpist, though incredibly versatile when it comes to music that she plays, compposes and arranges for harp. 

Floraleda Sacchi – “Skin Against Skin”.

Hey people! 🙂

For today, I thought I’d share with you some original work by this great and versatile Italian harpist. This piece comes from her 2020 album called Chiaroscuro Harp.

https://open.spotify.com/track/6QrxQWXir9vtzcCkrsSn4W?si=1e74c9d764c5415d

Floraleda Sacchi – “Skin Against Skin”.

Floraleda Sacchi – “Outer Space (Gnossienne 1).

Hi guys! 🙂

Today I have another piece played by Floraleda Sacchi for you, but this time not her original work. The gnossiennes are experimental compositions written by the French composer Erik Satie for piano. A lot of music for piano can be played for harp and even more is rearranged by harpists like Floraleda Sacchi. This piece is the Gnossienne no. 1.

Floraleda Sacchi – “We Arrive From Away”.

Hey people! 🙂

For today I want to introduce to you a really atmospheric, evocative and thoroughly luscious piece from Floraleda Sacchi’s last year’s album “Darklight”. I really like it just because it’s so evocative and it’s easy to imagine things when listening to it. It always makes me think of some fairytale-like folk who live in some exotic-ish, beautiful place, have everything they want, and I like to think why they arrive to our normal world and all sorts of things and almost every time I do it I come up with a bit or a lot different ideas. It’s also fairly long and I guess I’ve said that more than enough on here that I particularly love long solo harp pieces and the longer the better.

Floraleda Sacchi – “Jack”.

Hey people! 🙂

What a beautiful title this piece has, doesn’t it? 😀 Obviously the Jackophile in me really likes it. This piece comes from the Italian harpist Floraleda Sacchi’s 2008 album Minimal Harp, and is originally a composition of Michael Nyman, from his 1999 soundtrack album Wonderland, as in the film Wonderland in which it was used. I haven’t watched the film and I don’t know if there is any Jack in it and what the title of this track refers to, but I really like its sound on harp.

Floraleda Sacchi – “Temple of Sound”.

Hiya people! 🙂

Today I’d like to share with you another piece from Floraleda Sacchi, from her 2017 album Dark Light, from which I’ve already shared some tracks before. This album showcases in such a creative way how the harp is not just an instrument for classical or folk music, but electronic music too. This piece has been composed by Italian innovative pianist, merging both classical and electronic music, Roberto Cacciapaglia. I really love this piece and the title feels so adequate to the way it sounds!

Floraleda Sacchi – “Andras”.

Hey people! 🙂

Today I come to you with another piece from the very versatile Italian harpist Floraleda Sacchi. This is her version of Andras, originally composed by the German pianist Max Richter. I like Max Richter’s music as well, and the original version of this piece, but harp always rules for me. It’s not available on YouTube so I’m sharing it from Spotify and people who don’t have Spotify can click the link below to find it on their favourite streaming service, provided it is on there, of course.

Floraleda Sacchi – “Andras”.

Floraleda Sacchi – “Metamorphosis 2”.

Hey people! 🙂

This amazing piece played by the Italian harpist Floraleda Sacchi originally comes from the American avant-garde composer and multi-instrumentalist Philip Glass, from a piano solo album of his. Five of the tracks on this album are called Metamorphosis and they are inspired by the Franz Kafka novella by the same title. Floraleda Sacchi released an album with various works of this composer, including all five Metamorphosis pieces, and here’s the second one of them.

Floraleda Sacchi – “Said And Done”.

Hey people! 🙂

For today, I have another instrumental harp piece for you, but more classical/experimental than Celtic or folksy. Floraleda Sacchi is someone whose music I’ve shared on here before quite a few times, both her own compositions and her interpretations of other people’s music. This one is from the latter category. This delightfully long piece was originally written by German classical and electronic composer and pianist Nils Frahm. The original is also extremely interesting, but because I love harp so much, Floraleda’s version speaks to me even more.