All about Emanuel

I used to think this name was strange and a bit too softy for a guy, but things have changed and I really like it these days. I like the Biblical connection and also it has something mysterious to it. The feminine forms Emanuela and Emmanuelle are even more beautiful. Emanuela and Manuela are also used in Poland (though in the case of Emanuela I have no idea if it’s actually used anywhere else other than in religious orders, Manuela is for sure though). Both are very rare and so is Em(m)anuel, though I recently met a Polish mummy online whose son is called Emanuel. I think the downside of this name for me is that it doesn’t really have cool nicknames, especially in Polish, though Russian Emik is quite cute. But I think Emmanuelle has a huge nickname potential and I love it about it.
How do you guys feel about this name, or the whole family of names related to Emmanuel? 🙂

Onomastics Outside the Box

U.S. actor Edward G. Robinson, né Emanuel Goldenberg, 1893–1973

Emanuel is the Romanian, Scandinavian, German, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, and Croatian form of the Hebrew Imanuel (God is with us). In the Book of Isaiah, this is foretold as the name of the Messiah. Somewhat surprisingly, the name didn’t become popular in the Anglophone world till the 16th century (with the spellings Emmanuel and Immanuel). In continental Europe, it’s always been far more popular.

The variation Emánuel is Hungarian; Emanuël is Dutch; Emanúel is Icelandic; and Émanuél is Kashubian. I’ve really grown to love this name, not least because it was the birth name of one of my favourite male actors of the sound era!

Other forms include:

1. Emmanuel is French and English. The variation Emmanúel is Icelandic, and Emmanuël is Dutch.

2. Immanuel is German and English. The variation Immanúel is Icelandic, and Immanuël is Dutch.

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