Delyth Evans – “Gymnopedie III”.

Hey people! 🙂

Recently I shared with you one of the Gnossiennes composed by Eric Satie and played on the harp by Floraleda Sacchi, and today I’d like to share another, and I guess more commonly known, composition by Eric Satie – the last of his Gymnopedies. – Gymnopedies are three pieces of music that Satie composed for piano, all very melancholic pieces (the first is meant to be played painfully, the second sadly, and the third – the one we’ll listen to today – gravely) and I’ve heard quite a few different harp performances of them and I really like how they sound played on the harp. The name of these pieces comes from some ancient Greek festivity called gymnopaedia, during which young men were dancing naked/unarmed. I have a little bit of a personal connection with Gymnopedies because when I was in nursery, there was a documentary that was being filmed about our nursery (for the blind) and how we lived in there. Then all of our parents got a copy of this film. I now know that my Mum hated that film, but she watched it a lot anyways especially when I was away at school and then she always ended up crying. Once I grew up a bit I never liked watching it either or people mentioning it, something about it is very depressing to me though I’m pretty sure it’s just in my brain and all sorts of memories coming up rather than the documentary itself being objectively depressing. Anyways, gymnopedies were in the soundtrack of this film. I actually don’t remember now if it was all of the Gymnopedies or just one, and if one then which one, because I haven’t watched that in ages nor has my Mum, but I am sure that there was at least one Gymnopedie. I guess Gymnopedies are a sort of go-to soundtrack for all things that are meant to be tear-jerking because I’ve heard them used a lot in this way. This is actually a bit of a pity, because they’re great pieces of music, and while they’re melancholic, it’s not in a tear-jerking, maudlin way. But despite my Mum hated that film, she really liked this music and wanted to know what it is, and finally when she found out she bought some music album where Gymnopedies were included, I don’t know who played them. And she still really likes them despite they sometimes make her think about the times when I was at school and how it made her sad that I couldn’t be at home with my family. And that’s why, when it comes to me, what I primarily associate Gymnopedies and what they make me think of when I hear them is my Mum, rather than the time when I was in nursery, which I’m so glad about, because otherwise they’d probably be totally spoilt for me, and as it is, I really love them. Especially, like I said, played on harp. This third, grave Gymnopedie in A minor is played by the already well-known harpist on this blog, Delyth Evans (currently Jenkins) from Wales.

Delyth Evans – “Ysbryt Kilvrough” (Spirit of Kilvrough).

Hi people! 🙂

Today I have for you a piece played by the Welsh Celtic harpist Delyth Evans, better known as Delyth Jenkins these days, from her 1991 album “Delta (Cerddoriaeth y Delyn Geltaidd/Music of the Celtic Harp”. I suppose that the Kilvrough in the title refers to Kilvrough Manor, a country house near Swansea. And the spirit should perhaps actually be translated as ghost? I’m not sure, I haven’t heard anything about this place being haunted or the like, but then I know next to nothing about it in general.

Delyth Evans – “Yr Hen Don/Y Corgi Bach” (The Old Wave/The Little Corgi).

Hey people! 🙂

For today, I chose to share with you a set of two (I think traditional) tunes played on the Celtic harp by Delyth Evans, currently known as Delyth Jenkins. I find both of them really nice.

Delyth Jenkins – “Mwynder Maldwyn” (The Gentleness of Montgomeryshire).

Hey people! 🙂

Let’s listen to Delythh Jenkins today! I’ve shared some of her music before, solo, with her daughter Angharad, and a project she was a part of years ago called Aberjaber. Today I’m sharing a piece from one of her solo albums.

The Maldwyn (or Moontgomeryshire) in the title is a historical county in mid-Wales which now is a part of Powys. If you’re familiar with Nansi Richards, either from my blog where I’ve shared some of her music, or from wherever else, her bardic name was Telynores Maldwyn, or the Montgomery Harpist, because that’s where she lived. Delyth Jenkins also originates from there, and, curiously, I’ve read that both Nansi Richards and Delyth Jenkins were born in the same place – Oswestry in England, aka the Welshest town in England.

Mwynder Maldwyn is a sort of saying in Welsh, which could be translated as the gentleness of Maldwyn but I guess mwynder doesn’t really mean literally the same thing as gentleness in English. In any case, it’s used in reference to the natural beauty of the area, as well as the traits of the people.

I’ve never been to Montgomeryshire, nor even to Wales, but if I was to form some sort of an opinion about the place from this tune, it must be really extremely beautiful and I’d love to see it, even though nothing can beat Gwynedd for me. 😀

Delyth Jenkins ft. Angharad Jenkins – “Glyn Tawe”.

Hi people! 🙂

Another piece today featuring Delyth Jenkins, this time with her daughter – Angharad – playing fiddle. They’re also known together as DNA. I really really love this beautiful peace. Its title comes from Glyn Tawe, a hamlet near the river Tawe in Powys in Wales.

Delyth Evans – “A L’Entree De L’Este”.

Hi guys! 🙂

I have another short and sweet harp piece for you today, only this time it’s from Delyth Jenkins (nee Evans) who plays Celtic harp, unlike Llio Rhydderch who plays Welsh triple harp. I’ve already shared with you at least one piece by her from what I remember, in collaboration with her daughter Angharad, they work as a duo called DNA.

Since this piece has a French title, and I don’t know this language beyond some little words and phrases or what I can figure out thanks to other languages that I know, I have no clue what the title means exactly.