Delyth & Angharad Jenkins – “Brandy Cove”.

   And the tune I have for you today comes from the Welsh duo Delyth & Angharad Jenkins, also regularly featured on here. Delyth plays the Celtic harp and is Angharad’s mother, she has also released solo albums and in the past used to be part of the Anglo-Welsh group Aberjaber whose music also has appeared on here previously. Angharad plays fiddle and is part of many other musical projects and groups, like Calan or Pendevig. I believe this piece is their original, and it takes its name from a cove on the Gower Peninsula, which is called this way because it is said to have been used a lot by smugglers in the 18th century to unload their illegal alcohol and tobacco. 

Ailie Robertson – “Brandy Wines”.

   Hi people! 🙂 

   For today, I have another piece of Scottish folk music, this time from the harpist Ailie Robertson, a couple of whose songs I’ve shared on here in the past. This one comes from her album called Ailie’s Traditional Spirits where she is accompanied by other Scottish folk musicians. 

Órla Fallon – “Bean Pháidín / Drops of Brandy (Medley) (Páidín’s Wife…).

      Hiya people! 🙂 

   For today, I have a medley of Irish traditional tunes for you, by Órla Fallon, Irish singer and harpist who is well-known in the Celtic music world both for her solo music and being a member of Celtic Woman, and whose music I’ve shared on here many times before. Speaking of Celtic Woman, they have also recorded their version of the first song in this medley, Bean Pháidín, and their version was the first one I heard. As you’ll be able to figure out from the translation of the lyrics, it is a song of a woman who is in love with a guy called Páidín and is very jealous of his wife, wishing that it could have been her – the lyrical subject of the song – who could be his wife. The second piece is a slip jig, apparently of Scottish origin. 

   

It’s a pity that I am not, that I am not
It’s a pity that I am not Páidín’s wife
It’s a pity that I am not, that I am not
And the woman he has is dead
 
 
I would go to Galway, to Galway
I would go to Galway with Páidín
I would go to Galway, to Galway
would return home with him in the boat
 
 
I would go to the Clifden market
And into Bal th in the Bay
I would look in through the windows
Hoping to see Páidín’s wife
 
 

May you break your legs, your legs
May you break your legs, Páidín’s wife
May you break your legs, your legs
May you break your legs and your bones
 
 
I wore out my shoes, my shoes
I wore out my shoes chasing Páidín
I wore out my shoes, my shoes
wore out the soles and the heels