My favourite “Pat Of Silver Bush” quotes.

So I thought I’d also share with you some of my favourite quotes from “Pat Of Silver Bush” series, also by Lucy Maud Montgomery. “Pat Of SIlver Bush” tells a story of Pat’s life. She is very deeply attached to her family home called Silver Bush, she just literally lives for it, and as one of her uncles said, Silver Bush was her religion. She loved her family deeply and hated any changes. And hated leaving Silver Bush. Since as you probably know I’ve spent almost my entire childhood at the boarding school and hated, I related to Pat a lot, almost as much as to Emily of New Moon. So here are some quotes.

“Don’t be fretting…about me marrying. Marrying’s a trouble and not marrying’s a trouble and I sticks to the trouble I knows.”

“If you believe in a thing it doesn’t matter whether it exists or not”

“No matter what dreadful things happened at least there were still cats in the world.”

“Oh, oh, it’s not meself that do be knowing what the girls of today are coming to. Trying to make thimselves into min and not succading very well at that.”

And here are some quotes from “Mistress Pat”:

“There might be some hours of loneliness. But there was something wonderful even in loneliness. At least you belonged to yourself when you were lonely.” —

“I don’t seem to be like other girls, Judy. They all want to go to college and have a career. I don’t…I just want to stay at Silver Bush and help you and mother. There’s work for me here, Judy…you know there is. Mother isn’t strong. As for being educated…I shall be well educated…love educates, Judy.”

“I’ve always thought nobody understood me quite as well as I understood myself.”

“I love keeping house…it’s really a lovely phrase isn’t it? Keeping it…holding it fast against the world…against all the forces trying to tear it open.”

“If one could only feel always like this,” Pat had said once to Judy. “All the little worries swallowed up…all the petty spites and fears and disappointments forgotten…just love and peace and beauty.”

“Oh, oh, but what wud there be lift for heaven, girl dear?” asked Judy.”

“These modern novels that leave everything unfinished annoy me…”

“But things are often unfinished in real life,” said Pat…

“All the more reason why they should come right in books,” said Uncle Horace testily. “Real life! We get enough real life living. I like fairy tales. I like a nice snug tidy ending in a book with all the loose ends tucked in.”

“They can laugh when things go wrong. I like that. Anyone can laugh when it’s all smooth sailing.”

“Everybody is a little insane on some points”

My favourite “Jane Of Lantern Hill” quotes.

I was rereading this book a few days ago for like a fourth time in my life I guess, and thought I’d share with you a few of my favourite quotes from this book. For those of you who have never heard of it, it’s written by Lucy Maud Montgomery. It tells the story of a girl called Jane, who lives with her mum and her grandmother in Toronto. She is mainly brought up by her stern and demanding grandma, because her mum, although very loving, caring and just wonderful, is afraid to opose and claims she should be grateful for her mother for things she did for her. Jane thinks her father died, but one year she’s told he’s still alive, and then she gets a letter from him and he invites her for holidays on Prince Edward Isle. And then the most interesting part of this book starts. So here are a few quotes. I usually don’t particularly search for quotes in books and don’t focus on them a lot, but since I’ve been rereading Montgomery’s books many times, I have my favourite quotes or even whole paragraphs in her books.

“It’s the fools that make all the trouble in the world, not the wicked.”

“Can I help you?” said Jane.

Though Jane herself had no inkling of it, those words were the keynote of her character. Any one else would probably have said, “What is the matter?” But Jane always wanted to help: and, though she was too young to realize it, the tragedy of her little existence was that nobody ever wanted her help.”

“Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.” The most terrible and tremendous saying in the world, Jane… because we are all afraid of truth and afraid of freedom… that’s why we murdered Jesus.”

Question of the day.

What is the worst book to movie adaptation you’ve ever seen and which movie was much better than the book?

My answer:

Don’t have much to say here really, at least not about movie to book adaptations. But as for book to movie, I’ll pick “Emily From New Moon”, because the movie is gross. There are some weird sexual scenes or allusions, which you WON’t find in the book at all, and generally, being a huge fan of both “Emily…” and Lucy Maud Montgomery’s other works, I felt like this movie was pretty much ripped of that moving beauty the book has. Just very crappy.

Which book and movie would you pick?

Question of the day.

Here’s the last question from the series about reading:

Did you like reading as a kid, love it or detest it?

My answer:

as I wrote a few posts ago, I had a period very early on, when I didn’t like reading, but it was very short and passed quickly, and then I started to absolutely love reading. Books were my main source of knowledge about the world, about the people etc. as well as one of my forms of escape from the reality and I’ve always found it very therapeutic. as far as I can remember, words were always very important to me, I could feel them in so many ways, since I guess I have some kind of synesthesia related to words, I’ll probably post about it in future, I liked to play with them in different ways, learn new ones, I just loved the language in general, so reading even increased it. I loved the fact how it extended my vocabulary and still does and I loved it when I noticed it how flexible the language can really be. So I definitely loved and still love reading a lot.

How about you? Did the situation changed since your childhood? 🙂

Question of the day.

Did you learn [to read] through phonics or memorisation?

My answer:

Completely through memorisation. How it started for me was that we were getting a text to read, as easy as possible, but not only with the letters we’ve learnt, and before we even started to analyse it as for which letters ae which and stuff, we had to memorise (at least partly) the text, and then we read it multiple times without even recognising many letters consciously. it was a bit weird, and I think pretty boring, but apparently that had to help us accustom to reading in general. There was such a funny situation when I came home for holidays and had my book with readings with me. And we had some guests – grandparents, some aunts and uncles, mostly family – and my Dad wanted to show off with me and that I am starting to read. So I opened the book on one of the readings that we had to practice, and followed the text, but just was saying what I memorised and remembered. And they all were like WOOOOW! You can read such a complicated thing! In fact, it wasn’t complicated at all, I guess, but just much more than you’d expect from a child in first grade lol. My Dad was astonished too. and I was very proud of myself, because I didn’t really differentiate between memorising and reading yet, I was also sure I am reading, just like them. 😀 The only conscious person in that chaos was my Mum.

You? 🙂

Question of the day.

Was it easy for you to learn to read, or was it difficult?

My answer:

Apparently, when one of the staff at my nursery showed Mum how I’m going to read and write, she felt it’s impossible for me to achieve it. She already knew I have issues with coordination and sensory integration and she thought it would be just impossible for me to manage it. However, that turned out not being true at all. Although my coordination and sensory integration still is poor, and I mean actually very poor, it went relatively easy. At the beginning, I had a period when I didn’t like to read, it was just very exhausting for me and boring and all. But it changed very quickly and suddenly when I started to make some real progress, I started to love reading. And I learnt it very quickly. I remember my class teacher was making some additional readings for me, I know they were about a boy named Jacek and a girl named Fifi (I asked her to write about them for me, I don’t know why I came up with Fifi though). And I remember that one of them was about Jacek breaking his leg and walking with crutches, the scenario was also mine. 😀 I loved these readings so much and they were much better than what we had in our text books. Back then I was able to only read in Braille, I wasnn’t very familiar with technologies in early primary school as I had to teach myself about them, so I didn’t have anything to read at home and that was the only thing I really disliked about being at home, because I quickly realised that life without books is quite boring. So my poor Mum was desperately looking for some libraries or other stuff around our voivodeship (voivodeship is like a Polish province), but it didn’t help that much, so finally she signed me up for the Central Library for the blind and they always sent me just literally packages of books. It was quite an interesting view for our neighbours 😀 (keep in mind that Braille books are always larger than standard ones) and they were wondering why we get such an extensive mail all the time. Sometimes Mum sent me some books to the boarding school, but it didn’t work out practically. I also used to steal some old books from the attic. 😀 Things got more severe when I left the boarding school for two years for the integration school, I couldn’t cope emotionally at the boarding as you probably already know, so we thought maybe integration school will work out for me. At this time I had a legs surgery and I was rather immobile for months afterwards and, besides it being awful overall, it was also just so incredibly boring, so the only constructive thing I actually could do and enjoy was reading. I was literally able to devour anything readable, now I’m much more fastidious. 😀

How about your experiences? 🙂