Áine Minogue – “Griogal Cridhe” (Beloved Gregor).

   Hi people! 🙂 

   Today I’d like to share with you a Scottish Gaelic lament, or lullaby, sung by an Irish singer who lives in the US. I think I have shared three songs by Aine Minogue on my blog so far and surely must have mentioned how she was one of my most favourite Celtic folk singers and harpists when I was a teenager. I still like her a lot, and this has always been one of my favourite songs by her. Generally, this song has a very interesting melody in my opinion, and I like most versions of it that I’ve heard. 

   It was written in the 16th century by a woman called Mór Chaimbeull after the death of her husband,  the chief of the Clan Mac Gregor, Griogair Ruadh Mac Griogair, or Gregor the Red Mac Gregor in English who was executed at Taymouth Castle. 

   Here’s the translation of this song: 

   Many a night both wet and dry
Weather of the seven elements
Gregor would find for me a rocky shelter
Which I would take eagerly.
Obhan, Obhan, Obhan iri
Obhan iri O!
Obhan Obhan Obhan iri,
Great is my sorrow, great.
I climbed into the upper chamber
And lay upon the floor
And I would not find my dearest Gregor
At the table in his place.
Great darling of the World’s people
They spilt your blood yesterday
And they put your head on an oaken stake
Near where your body lay.
Though now I have no apples,
And others have them all,
My own apple, fragrant, handsome –
And the back of his head on the ground.
I would be glad to be with dear Gregor
Guarding cattle in the glen
Instead of with the great Baron of Dalach,
White silk around my head.
While the young wives of the town
Serenely sleep tonight
I will be at the edge of your gravestone
Beating my two hands.

Aine Minogue – “The Selkie” & Cecile Corbel – “The Great Selkie”.

Hey people! 🙂

I think I’ve shared that on my blog already that one of my favourite folk creatures are selkies. So today I thought I’d share with you two songs about them, which are practically variations of one song, both vastly differing arrangements. Both Aine Minogue’s and Cecile Corbel’s music has already been featured on my blog. They’re both harpists. Aine was born in country Tipperary in Ireland but currently resides in the Boston area, whereas Cecile is from Brittany.

Usually when I share two versions of the same or almost the same song it’s because I can’t choose between them, but here, I can say with no hesitation that Aine’s version speaks to me much more. Still, I really like Cecile’s version too, and I think it sounds very interesting, and even more so when you compare the two.

Aine Minogue:

Cecile Corbel:

Aine Minogue – All About Eve.

Hi guys! 🙂

Aine Minogue is my most favourite harpist in the whole world and one of my most favourite female singers. She’s so soothing. I’ve already showed you one of her instrumental pieces called “Brigid’s Feast”. If anyone of you like Enya, I’m sure you’ll love Aine, if you don’t know her yet. I can say that her music has pulled me through a lot for many years, it always gives me what I need the most. It soothes me, helps me escape from the reality, or gives me the space to think more on things, elevates my mood or keeps me company when I’m depressed, helps me overcome or let out my feelings, inspires me or helps my mind to clear itself from all thoughts. Her voice is so ethereal and beautiful and so is her accent, and I absolutely love her harp. When I’m in the mood, I can listen to her for hours, and so I do today.

The song I want to show you comes from aine’s newest album called “Eve”. It’s inspired by Eve as an archetype of femininity, or biblical Eve, or whoever/whatever she can be for AIne and for us. The song itself is particularly inspired by the movie “All About Eve”.

As for Aine, she comes from Ireland, from co. Tipperary, but now she lives in New England.

Track of the day (1st February) – Aine Minogue – Brigid’s Feast.

So, did I ever mention on here before how crazy I am about harp? Well, Celtic harp mainly, but also harp in general. I think I didn’t do it, so I do now. I really really love harp. Welsh triple harp, Irish Celtic harp, classical harp and even autoharp and other kinds of harps. Well I probably haven’t heard them all, but all of these I’ve heard, I love, or at least like.

So today I come to you with a piece from the repertoire of Aine Minogue – who is an Irish Celtic harpist, currently living in the US. She is also singing frequently on her albums, her music is extremely soothing, dream-like, but her voice is also very soothing and unique so her harp, voice and other instruments make a really great mix. I sometimes just can’t stop listen to her.

this is an instrumental. I chose it firstly because it’s just so beautiful, so much of harp, such beautiful, but simple harmonies, etc. but also because of the fact that it is a perfect track for yesterday. That’s why I am so sorry I didn’t manage to show you it on time.

Yesterday, besides the fact that it was my birthday, 😀 it was also the feast day of saint Bridget of Kildare, who is an Irish saint, but centuries ago, Celts honoured one of their goddesses, Brigid, on this day. Actually, some people say that Brigid and saint Bridgt are one and the same person, just that the first  evolved in the latter in people’s minds when Catholicism started to dominate Celtic beliefs. Brigid’s feast day was also called Imbolc and marked the beginning of spring.

Brigid was the goddess of the hearth, poetry, healing, childbirth and unity.

OK, so here’s this stunning piece of Aine’s music: