Names for the Joyful Mysteries

I have reblogged posts from many baby naming blogs for you guys as I’m crazy about names, but it has just dawned on me that I’ve never shared any posts from my most favourite baby naming blogger – Kate of Sancta Nomina – with you. It is my most favourite baby naming blog because it is all about Catholic names, and I am Catholic myself.
Kate re-shared this post yesterday, as it was the feast of Announciation, that she wrote a couple years ago so I thought I’d share it with you, my readers, as well, particularly that it is a difficult time for many of us so we need some more joy. Because, whether you are Catholic or not, there are lots of brilliant and joyful names here.
My favourite mysteries of the Rosary are definitely the Sorrowful ones, but I think I like the Joyful names most.
Which ones of these names are your favourites? Can you think of any more? If you’re not Catholic or maybe not a Christian in general, which names do you associate with joy or something joyful, or which names make you think of/feel joy?
I really like angelic names on this list, including Gabrielle and Gabriel. I think Evangeline/Evangelina would fit here too, because, while it is not strictly angelic, it does share one of its roots with Angelina and the like, and as a whole means “bearer of good news”. I am also a big fan of Elizabeth and many of its variant forms from all around the world. Emmanuelle is so sweet and I love it, but I also like the masculine form. I also love Felicity and Felix so very much. I think Felicia could also make a great fit for this list! I’ve never heard of Fiat used as a name before but I love the sound of this word and the Marian connection so I’m all for it. Well… maybe not here, but in English it would work brilliantly as a middle name. I think Grace/Gracia/Graciela could make this list as well, as a reference to the mystery of Announciation. Also one of other possible options that I thought of is Lucy, or its variant forms like Lucia, Luz, Lucinda, Luce, Lux, or the male variants Lucius or Lucian or even Lucas or Luke… I know that it would fit better for the Light mysteries, but I also think that it could be a nice tie to the mystery of Presentation and Jesus who is “the Light to enlighten pagan nations”, so it would make a gorgeous fit for a baby born on Candlemas since Lucy & co mean light. Oh and this makes me think of Candelaria! I adore Noelle so very much, and I like Noel as well.
I really like Christopher and its meaning. I also like John and especially the possibility to nickname it to Jack, YAY! 😀 Jesus sounds awkward as a normal human name outside of the Spanish-speaking world to me personally as a Pole, but I guess Joshua could be a cool alternative for English-speaking parents.
So, what would you add? What names fill you with joy?

Sancta Nomina

Yesterday was one of my very favorite feast days and the first of the Joyful Mysteries, which makes today the perfect Tuesday to post names associated with them! And also, Dwija’s little Helenwas discharged from the NICU yesterday and is home with her family, happy and thriving. Joy all around!!

Today’s post is a continuation of my Mysteries of the Rosary series, having already done names for the Sorrowful and Glorious Mysteries, and your comments have been invaluable — keep them coming!

These are the Joyful Mysteries (read more here) (and here’s how to pray the Rosary):

The Annunciation by Gabriel to Mary (yesterday’s feast!)
The Visitation of Mary to Her Cousin Elizabeth
The Nativity of Jesus
The Presentation of the Baby Jesus in the Temple
The Finding of the Child Jesus in the Temple

Names associated with the Joyful Mysteries might include:

Girls

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Question of the day.

Hey people! 🙂

Which of your former classmates had the most interesting or unusual names?

My answer:

I hadn’t had very many with unusual names really. Zofijka is being much more lucky with that hahaha. One that comes to mind is a girl called Luiza, which name has always been somewhere among my most favourites for girls. It’s certainly not unheard of, but not very popular at all. Also, one of my groupmates – not classmates – at the boarding school had a very unusual name, and I’ve never encountered or even heard of anyone with the same name neither before I’d met her, not afterwards, her name was Arnika, as in arnica – the plant. – In my college/high school there was a woman called Adela, which is a classic and vintage name that I love, that has probably never been highly popular as far as I know, although is now enjoying some more attention from parents and was a little below the top 100 last year, but still would rather be associated with an elderly lady by most people. Meanwhile my classmate certainly wasn’t older than in her mid 30’s or something (it was a weekend school for adults in case you didn’t know or remember). Also, through my education, I’d had plenty of classmates with so called “seasonal”, or in any case quite modern names, that is ones that were popular only about the time when they/we were born, were hardly used before, or not for a long time, and felt unusual for some, or fresher than more classic names, and people might have not been as used to them as they are now, but that now feel very much associated with the generation. For example names like Klaudia (I had quite a bunch of classmates with this name throughout my schooling at different stages and in different schools), Angelika (I went to college with two, one spelt with a g and another with a dż), Krystian, Olaf, Oliwia, Nikola (it’s a girl’s name in Poland, unlike in many other Slavic countries), Or some had names that maybe weren’t super popular back when they were born, so might have felt a little more unexpected, but are very high for babies right now, like Kornelia, Marcelina, Nadia and Oliwier. So overall very normal. It’s possible that I don’t remember someone right now, because one year while going to school I had individual education, and was only going to school twice a week, and while in college, there was a lot of rotation, people were dropping out, new people were coming, many were absent for weeks and later on I started to do most of the material remotely and saw my classmates less.

So, how about you? 🙂

Question of the day.

If you had to name your child after a city, what would you name them? Boy AND girl.

My answer:

Well. I guess that depends… because in Poland we don’t really have the tradition of using geographic names as human first names, and for a long time, when we had official naming rules, it was actually not allowed, or at least somehow not correct from the linguistic point of view. We do have some names that are well-known as names and at the same time happen to be names of cities, but it’s not a thing really to name babies after places, even now when we no longer have that rule. I can’t really think of many Polish given names that would coincide with city names except for some very old Slavic names (like there’s a Polish town or city, I’m not sure what it qualifies as, anyway it’s called Wrocław, and there used to be an old Slavic name Wrocław as well) but those don’t really appeal to me. There also are names of foreign cities like Wiktoria, Adelajda, Konstancja and Florencja (though I’ve never seen Florencja in actual use, it’s rather Flora or Florentyna), or even Emilia as there’s Reggio Emilia in Italy, and I do like them though I’m not sure I like Konstancja and Adelajda enough to use them, and I think Wiktoria is too popular for me, and I wouldn’t call my child Emilia, first because it is my name and second because it’s popular for babies right now. So, if we are talking about Polish, I’m a bit clueless. Oh, I could use Filadelfia for a girl and call her Fila, but that would be really extravagant! 😀 Other than that I really can’t think of many city and people names in Polish.

I have more ideas if we’re talking about English names, assuming I lived in the English-speaking world or wanted to give my child a foreign name for some reason. For a boy, I think I’d go with Milan, just because I like this name and quite a lot. I also like Hamilton because I have nice associations with it, though the name itself is not very much my style and if I had any more children I’d probably have a hard time finding names that would fit with Hamilton and that I would like. But oh… wait, I’ve just got an idea! Isn’t there a city somewhere in the US that’s called Jackson? So yeah, I could happily go with that! I could have either two sons Hamilton and Jackson because I happen to like them both even though they aren’t exactly the kind of names I normally tend to like, or I could have one boy called Milan Jackson, but going by Jack, yay! I just feel like Milan Jackson goes better than Jackson Milan, what do you think? For girls, I could make whole city combos! I could happily use Sofia, Florence, Adelaide (which I like more than Adelajda), Victoria, Chelsea (though I’d rather use Chelsea as a middle), Laris(s)a. So, those are my ideas.

How about you? 🙂 It doesn’t have to be a lot of ideas, of course, can be just for one girl and one boy.

All about Emanuel

I used to think this name was strange and a bit too softy for a guy, but things have changed and I really like it these days. I like the Biblical connection and also it has something mysterious to it. The feminine forms Emanuela and Emmanuelle are even more beautiful. Emanuela and Manuela are also used in Poland (though in the case of Emanuela I have no idea if it’s actually used anywhere else other than in religious orders, Manuela is for sure though). Both are very rare and so is Em(m)anuel, though I recently met a Polish mummy online whose son is called Emanuel. I think the downside of this name for me is that it doesn’t really have cool nicknames, especially in Polish, though Russian Emik is quite cute. But I think Emmanuelle has a huge nickname potential and I love it about it.
How do you guys feel about this name, or the whole family of names related to Emmanuel? 🙂

Onomastics Outside the Box

U.S. actor Edward G. Robinson, né Emanuel Goldenberg, 1893–1973

Emanuel is the Romanian, Scandinavian, German, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, and Croatian form of the Hebrew Imanuel (God is with us). In the Book of Isaiah, this is foretold as the name of the Messiah. Somewhat surprisingly, the name didn’t become popular in the Anglophone world till the 16th century (with the spellings Emmanuel and Immanuel). In continental Europe, it’s always been far more popular.

The variation Emánuel is Hungarian; Emanuël is Dutch; Emanúel is Icelandic; and Émanuél is Kashubian. I’ve really grown to love this name, not least because it was the birth name of one of my favourite male actors of the sound era!

Other forms include:

1. Emmanuel is French and English. The variation Emmanúel is Icelandic, and Emmanuël is Dutch.

2. Immanuel is German and English. The variation Immanúel is Icelandic, and Immanuël is Dutch.

3…

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Quintuple syllables

Mmmm! 😋 So many delicious names, don’t you think, guys? 🙂 So, which ones on this list do you like? 🙂
I love many of these, and like most of them actually especially the feminine ones, I find most of the masculine slightly clunky.
I love -bella names super girly and cute, so I find Adorabella adorable.
I prefer just Aurelia to Aureliana but Aureliana is cool too.
Candelaria is sweet and I love the Catholicky feel of it.
Eleonora is by far my most favourite variant of Eleanor, and Emanuela is gorgeous.
I am Emilia Anna and sometimes I sign myself Emilianna for fun, although in Polish phonetics that’s four syllables. I much prefer it with two n’s.
I have soft spot for Evangeline and Evangelina too, it’s even more frilly! 😀
Not crazy for Leokadia but I like that it becomes to feel vintage here while loses the dated & geriatric feel so should be fresh and ready for a comeback in a while in my view, just as all the Pelagias, Apolonias and other such. That could be an interesting change. I have two Leokadias in my family tree that I’m aware of. However in Polish phonetics that would actually be 4 syllables, not 5, as we pronounce it le-aw-KAH-dyah, the i is just kinda softening and doesn’t make its own syllable.
Michelangela and Michelangelo are so lovely, Michelangelo always makes me think of my Mum, and sometimes I call Misha Michelarcangelo because Russian blue cats come from Arkhangelsk and are sometimes called Archangelic.
Oliviana could be a nice twist on the overused Olivia.
Vitaliana and Viridiana both sound so fresh and make me think of spring.
Which ones do you like?

Onomastics Outside the Box

From the short and sweet to the long and flowery, here are some names with five syllables. Unsurprisingly, a great many of them are Italian.

Female:

Adorabella
Alexandria, Alexandrina
Anastasia, Anastasiya, Anastazia
Annunziata, Annunciata
Artemisia
Aureliana

Bartolomea
Bonaventura (means “good fortune” in Italian)
Candelaria
Capitolina, Kapitolina
Cassiopeia
Desideria
Diamantina
Dionisia

Eleftheria
Eleonora
Elisabeta, Elisabetta, Elizabeta
Emanuela
Emerentia
Emiliana
Evangelina

Giuliana
Immaculada
Innocentia, Innokentiya
Iphigenia, Efigenia
Ghisolabella
Leokadia, Leocadia (one of my fave Polish names)
Marionetta
Michelangela

Octaviana, Oktaviana
Oliviana
Olympiada, Olimpiada
Paraskovia, Paraskoviya
Rosamaria
Sebastiana
Solomonida
Theodosia

Valeriana
Vespasiana
Victoriana
Vitaliana
Viridiana
Yekaterina, Ekaterina
Yelikonida, Elikonida
Yelizaveta

Male:

Annunziato
Aureliano
Bartolomeo
Bonifacio
Desiderio
Emiliano
Giuliano
Martiniano
Maximilian
Michelangelo

Niktopolion (rare Russian form of Latin Nicopolitanus [citizen of Nicopolis]; born by poet Niktopolion Svyatskiy, 1854–1917)
Pantaleone (means “all lion” in Greek)
Sebastiano
Teodosio
Valeriano
Vespasiano
Vitaliano

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One-syllable names

Even though I am closer to be the kind of person who is more likely to gravitate towards Anastasias, Fiammettas, Leonardos, Zachariahs and the like, I think some of the one-syllable names are really endearing, and, after all, my most favourite male name ever – Jack – belongs to this category, hence I thought I’d share this post of Carrie-Anne’s with you guys.
Which one-syllable names are your favourite?
My most favourite of this list – except for Jac(k) that I’ve mentioned – are: Rhys (I prefer this spelling over Reese for both genders) Anne, Belle, Luz, Lyn(n(e)), Nell, Peace, Cliff, Finn, Flynn, John, Luke and Myles.

Onomastics Outside the Box

While some people gravitate towards long, flowery, ornate, multisyllabic names like Anastasia, Fiammetta, Leonardo, and Zachariah, others have a naming style which favours short, simple, and to the point. Towards that end, here are some names which fit the bill.

For the sake of relative brevity, I won’t be including Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese names. One-syllable names are the overwhelming rule in those languages, whereas they’re fairly less common in Indo–European languages.

Unisex:

Bay
Blake (I know this is traditionally male, but I was introduced to it through a female character on Guiding Light)
Dale
Drew
Lee
Quinn
Rain
Reese
Shai, Shay (means “gift” in Hebrew and completely separate from the male Irish name Shea/Shay)

Female:

Anne
Belle
Blaire
Blanche
Blythe
Bree, Brie
Brooke
Bryn, Brynn
Claire
Dawn
Dove
Eve

Faith
Fawn
Fern
Fleur
Gayle, Gail
Grace
Hope
Iynx (INKS), an obscure Greek love goddess. The English forms are…

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All about Lydia

Here’s another great post from Onomastics Outside the Box. 🙂
I honestly didn’t realise this name existed in so many languages! I like Lydia, perhaps not love but it is definitely a pretty name, with Biblical roots and feminine sounding, so there’s no reason for me not to like it. It has some elegance and sophistication to it. I also like our Polish Lidia, I guess I like the sound of it more, but the nickname Lidka which most Lidias go by ruins it completely to me and makes it sound shallow and kind of auntie-like, if you get what I mean.
Do you have a favourite form? I find the sami Livli very interesting.

Onomastics Outside the Box

Dissident Russian writer Lidiya Korneyevna Chukovskaya, 1907–1996

The English, German, and Greek name Lydia means, simply, “from Lydia” in Greek. Lydia was a region on Asia Minor’s west coast, reputedly named after legendary King Lydos (of unknown etymology). Today, Lydia is in western Turkey.

The name briefly appears in the Bible, on a woman whom St. Paul converts to Christianity. It didn’t become common in the Anglophone world till the Protestant Reformation.

Lydia was #77 when the U.S. began keeping name records in 1880, and stayed in the lower Top 100 till 1899. Over the ensuing decades, it gradually dipped in popularity, but never sank lower than #329 in 1973. From lows came highs, and in 1979 it rose to #296 from #324. In each succeeding year, Lydia was steadily more popular, till it re-entered the Top 100 in 2011. In 2018, it was #89.

Other forms of Lydia include:

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