Myrkur – “Två Konungabarn” (Two Children of the Kings).

Hey people! 🙂

For today, I decided to share with you a beautiful Swedish folk song, performed by a Danish artist. Myrkur means darkness in Icelandic and is a project of Amalie Bruun, who is into everything from black metal to folk, often with very strong pagan connections, which is why I don’t really listen to her particularly much but I appreciate her and her music for how invested she is into it. She can play several traditional instruments like nyckelharpa or lyre. And this is my favourite song of hers. The translation of the lyrics is below, I’ve taken it from

here,

although I’m not perfectly sure that everything in it is correct and some bits seem a bit weird compared with the original, but perhaps it wasn’t meant to be a literal translation so I didn’t change anything.

 

There were two noble children of the kings

Who exchanged their vows

And the one who will break it

Will live in great unrest

There was an old witch

Who overheard them talking

“I want to destroy their love

If I may live that day”

And the duke got ready and sailed

And the billow hit him in his chest

But when he was sinking

The light in the lantern ceased burning

The young maiden asked her father

“Near the little green river

Am I allowed to go for a walk

Near the little green river?”

“It’s enough I give a permission to go for a walk

Near the little green river

Wake up your younger brother

He can well go with you”

“What will my brother do there?

He doesn’t understand much

He shoots all little birds

That go along his way”

And the young maiden went for a walk

Near the little green river

And there she saw a fisherman

Who was fishing on his boat.

“Good day, good day to you fisherman

Good day to your boat

Have you seen a nobleman

Floating on the blue waves?”

“His socks were made of silk,

His shoes were with golden buckles

And I would never thought

That I’ll see a corpse smiling”

And the young maiden took the rings off her hand

And golden chain off her neck

And gave them to the little fisherman

Who lead the boats forward

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