Question of the day.

What are three things that make you happy instantly?

My answer:

I don’t know if these things always make me as much as happy and instantly, but they definitely do make me happier and are very effective at it.

Misha’s presence, listening to good music, and, most recently, playing BitLife. ๐Ÿ˜€

You? ๐Ÿ™‚

Llio Rhydderch – “Alaw I Nansi (Teyrnged Disgybl)” (Tune for Nansi (A Pupil’s Tribute)).

Hey people! ๐Ÿ™‚

Today, I’d like to share with you a tune from another harpist whom I really love, and only learned about last year. She is from Ynys Mon (also known as Anglesey) in Wales, and plays triple harp. I learned about Llio Rhydderch and her music from my most recent faza subject – Gwilym Bowen Rhys – and instantly loved her music. It has such a very special atmosphere to it, it’s hard to describe, but it is there. This is just a lovely upbeat tune, as its title suggests, dedicated to Nansi. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do. ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

Do you think certain things happen for a reason?

My answer:

Absolutely! Maybe not exactly every single thing, and not always for a reason that’s easy to figure out, or even possible to figure out for our small, human brains, but yes, I think a lot of things happen for a reason. Some of these reasons are very obvious, some need a bit more thinking, some need time to be able to see the connection between things, while other reasons are of a less obvious nature and sometimes may seem very random and coincidental at first but in fact they are not. There are a lot of different types of connections between things in the world, between people, so naturally there are often reasons for even the most trivial things. Still, I also believe there are things which do happen randomly and don’t seem to have any reason at all.

What do you think? ๐Ÿ™‚

Kirsten Brรฅten Berg “Heiemo Og Nykkjen” (Heiemo And Nykkjen) & Helene Bรธksle – “Heiemo Og Nykkjen”.

Hey guys! ๐Ÿ™‚

I’ve been planning to share this Norwegian folksong with you for ages, but somehow never did it in the end, so finally that’s what I’m doing today. This is one of the first Norwegian folk songs I’ve ever heard and instantly fell in love with it, the version I heard first was the one by Kirsten Braten Berg, and I just loved the harmonies in it, the way it sounded and just the general feel of it, even though I could understand barely anything out of it and it didn’t make too much sense. Usually if you can speak Swedish, you can understand Norwegian well enough that you can at least figure out the context, but my Swedish was only crawling at the time and even now I can’t really understand much out of it on my own, I guess because the lyrics are quite archaic.

Last year I also heard Helene Boksle’s versioon for the first time, Helene Boksle is a well-known Norwegian singer to me whom I like a whole lot and have shared a

Norwegian hymn

in her interpretation ages ago, so you may or may not recall her.

I really love both versions of this song, so, like I often do, I had a hard time deciding on one, and in the end chose to share both of them with you, as they are quite different from each other. Kirsten Braten Berg’s feels more raw, solely with the accompaniment of Ale Moler, and Helene’s is more rich and contemporary. Both are very expressive in their own, different ways.

The song is about a young girl called Heiemo – I couldn’t find any information on the origin of the name so it’s possible that it’s somehow changed and functions in a different form these days or fell out of use. Nykkjen is a creature in Norwegian, but also generally European folklore, also known as Neck, Nokk and lots of other similar things. It is some sort of a water sprite which “by default” has the form of a water-horse, but is also a shapeshifter, and it likes to lure people to the water with singing and music, quite like sirens, and then kill them. So this Nykkjen creature fell in love with Heiemo upon hearing her singing, and decided to kidnap her and then kill her. But things turned around and Heiemo courageously stabbed Nykkjen to death.

Below is the translation of this song that I found

here,

apparently written by a lady called Sheila Louise Wright.

 

โ€“ wake up you noble youngsters-

The Water spirit heard it, striding on the sea,

โ€“ Because you now have overslept โ€“

Heiemo sang her poem, it was singing in the hillside

The Water spirit heard it, the pagan dog.

The Water spirit spoke to his helmsman:

โ€œYou steer my ship upon christian land!โ€

โ€œI will go upon christian land,

the beautiful maid I will have.โ€

He then enters her house

with high hat and rosy cheek

The Water spirit danced and Heiemo sang her poem

it pleased all folks in the houses

โ€œNow every one has to go to his own home,

Heiemo I bring with me on the ship.โ€

โ€œHeiemo, Heiemo, quiet your wrath,

You should sleep on water spiritโ€™s arm.โ€

She stabbed the water spirit in his chest,

the nail ran into the root of his heart.

โ€œHere you lay water spirit, naked to raven and dog.

Still I have my singing need.โ€

 

 

Question of the day.

Do you believe in karma? Why?

My answer:

No. The simple answer is because I am Christian, and karma is a strictly hinduist/buddhist concept so it just doesn’t go hand in hand with my beliefs. I don’t believe in reincarnation, and those two thiings are strongly connected, so I can’t believe in karma either. I believe in that good may attract good, and evil may attract evil, but I don’t see it as some sort of a cosmic law which occurs in every single situation, I don’t think it’s something that happens automatically as a rule. Here on Earth, I think this happens mostly due to the fact that our actions usually trigger reactions of others, so if we do something good to them, they may feel inclined to express their gratitude and do something good to us, and if we do a lot of good to a lot of people, naturally we may be experiencing a lot of good in our lives, same goes for evil. But it’s not some process that’s always bound to occur and that always whenever you do something good or bad, it’ll come back to you. People do get away with evil actions and have successful lives, or good people have miserable lives, at times. As for the afterlife, I believe it’s God who judges us after our death, our good deeds and our sins, our choices in life, so what our afterlife ends up being like is the result and consequence of our choices here in this life. God can also reward us during our lives on Earth, if we do a lot of good in our lives, or He can allow difficult things to happen to us which may end up making us better people than we were before. But again, that’s not a rule in this world and there are plenty of very good-natured people, even saints throughout history who had done a whole lot of good deeds yet have suffered incredibly their entire lives.

What about you? ๐Ÿ™‚

Gwenan Gibbard – “Yr Hafren/Heulwen Haf” (The Severn/Summer Sunshine).

Hey people! ๐Ÿ™‚

A very nature-themed piece I’d like to share with you today, and a bit summery, contrasting with the fact that it’s snowing lightly over here right now. ๐Ÿ™‚ I shared a beautiful two-piece set by Gwenan Gibbard, and here’s another one. It feels very idyllic to me. The first piece in here is called “Yr Hafren”, Hafren being the original Welsh name for the river Severn. And the othet, summery piece is called “Heulwen Haf” which means Summer Sunrise. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do. ๐Ÿ™‚

Question of the day.

What small change could the world make to become a better place tomorrow?

My answer:

People could make sure to get some proper, good quality, long sleep tonight. A lot of people don’t get much sleep around the start of the new year, so if they finally did catch up on their lost sleep tonight, tomorrow we’d have less car accidents, and many other types of accidents, more happier people, smarter people, and people’s immune system would work better.

Your turn. ๐Ÿ™‚

Declan Galbraith – “You And Me”.

Hey guys! ๐Ÿ™‚

Hope you’re having a great start of the new year. For the start of the new year at My Inner Mishmash, I chose a song from one of my major fazas – Declan Galbraith aka Child Of Mind. – Because I realised that while I shared music from his debut album while he was 10, and his most recent music now that he is an adult and writing his own lyrics under the name of Child Of Mind, I haven’t shared anything from any of his teenage albums. So today I chose to share the title song from his 2007 album You And Me. If I’m counting right, he was 14 at the time. As you may know if you’ve read my previous posts where I wrote about him, he is British of Irish and Scottish heritage, but this particular album, as well as the one released the year before, was recorded in Germany and brought him particular fame there. Maybe not like sky-high fame but if people were likely to know his music anywhere, it was most likely in Germany.

He was undergoing voice change at the time, so I believe there’s a bit of autotune in there even though normally he has quite remarkable vocal control, and he sounds quite characteristic on this particular album. Also his music was quite different at the time than what he’s been creating most recently as Child Of Mind, and he mostly covered other people’s songs, or at least if he did write some of them they were not as ambitious as they are now, which is totally understandable given his age, but it’s just kind of striking when you have a closer look at his music as a whole picture.

At the time of my having a dominant faza on him, which was about 2013 (I guess) this was his newest album to date and I liked it the most, mostly because it was the most versatile musically and a bit more light rock-y than pop-y which I liked. But now that I know his later music, I do like it a lot more than You And Me and I must say that if I didn’t know him now, at this point in my life, and my first encounter with his music would be with this 2007 album, I’d probably not end up having a faza on him. Which would be sad, and I’d miss out on so much! ๐Ÿ˜€ So I’m glad it went differently and I came across his music much earlier, being a teen myself. So here is You And Me. ๐Ÿ™‚